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Direct sun for greenhouse grown Heliamphora?


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#1 Sockhom

 
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Posted 02 May 2012 - 00:08 AM

Hi,

I'm growing all my Heliamphora in my conservatory now ; they have previously been in terraria. I placed them in a bright area of the conservatory but there are only a couple of hours of direct light at dawn and I am wondering if the plants will get enough light to grow properly and be fully colored. Should plants from this genus receive several hours of direct sun a day?
Thank you for your advices.

All the best,

François.

#2 will9

 
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Posted 02 May 2012 - 08:11 AM

Hi,

I'm growing all my Heliamphora in my conservatory now ; they have previously been in terraria. I placed them in a bright area of the conservatory but there are only a couple of hours of direct light at dawn and I am wondering if the plants will get enough light to grow properly and be fully colored. Should plants from this genus receive several hours of direct sun a day?
Thank you for your advices.

All the best,

François.


Hi Francois,not need full sun ,this are highland plants like you know,give more sun means give more heat in summer ,this can be dangerous for your plants,all highland plants can be very sensitive to too match heat in a greenhousse,for me it s allways a problem in summer.Plants need only light to color up ,not sun,watch them if she came out from a terrarium,
Cheers Will

#3 Sockhom

 
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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:16 AM

Hi Will9,

Thank you for your input. I do realize the risk of overheating. But I was also wondering if a few hours of direct light per day would not be mandatory to get a good coloration(orange, red) .
I saw many several etiolated greenhouse grown Helimpahora in the past.

All the best,

François.

#4 chimanta

 
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Posted 03 May 2012 - 15:04 PM

Hello Francois

I grow some Helis in my greenhouse and some down in the basement for several years. To be honest, the ones down in the basement look much better. On the Tepuis some species receive a lot of sun like the Ptari or Murosipan species for example (low vegetation not much shade). But they are several hours per day "covered" by clouds.

On most of the opther Tepuis they where covered with shade also by plants, besides the clouds. For example: on the slopes of Illu where ionasii grows, the largest plants are growing in the shade of other plants same goes for exapendiculata and almost all the other species I know. If you have the right equipment out in the greenhouse, like a strong humidifier and you "fog" your greenhouse well for a good time of the day then it may work well for you.

However at least two other friends of mine made the same experiences as I did (basement with artificial light works better for Helis).

Best regards and good success!

Urs

#5 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 03 May 2012 - 19:53 PM

Hello François,

the two problems of overheating and a too short phase of acclimatisation to stronger light have been mentioned already - this seem the most problematic points for me as well.

Then there is a great difference in species - Urs mentioned some already. E.g. H. pulchella, minor, purpurascens, sarracenioides and others grow in direct sunlight, and even if there are some hours of clouds a day - the intension in the highland sun is high, and the plants are adapted to (or even need) the strong sunlight. And in the dry season, there may be days without clouds, and the plants have to stand this.

Other species as e.g. exappendiculata or huberi grow in shaded conditions in habitat - and for sure would be burnt in the strong sunlight.

An easy rule is - is the plant green and glabrous, then shaded conditions would be best.
For intensely -esp. red!- coloured and hairy species (or forms) there can never be enough sun (if you get control of the heat).

Under cultivation conditions, I agree with Urs that a shaded basement may be a more general and safe way - but not the more rewarding in my eyes. I would always favor a compact grown, deeply coloured and densely haired plant with a short flower stalk over a big, funnel shaped and green one with an etiolated stalk and a flower under the ceiling ;-). The bigger would not be the healthier for me then. But again - only for the suitable species and only when temperature stays low. What is not that easy to achieve...

Regards

Martin

#6 will9

 
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Posted 04 May 2012 - 09:51 AM

In my greenhousse whitout sun at all ,only filtred light,it s colorfull good enoufg for me,

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Cheers Will

#7 Sockhom

 
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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:21 AM

Hello Urs, Martin and Will9,

Thank you for your comments and advices.
Indeed Martin, all the Heliamphora species have not the same lights requirements and I have set my plants following what I know of their habitat. However, I'd like to know if the very coloured species like H. purpurescens actually needed a few to many hours of full sun to achieve their full coloration or if a very bright spot would be enough for this.

Will9, it looks like your plants manage to get nice colours despite being in a quite shady environment: well done.

Urs, I know that many growers consider that terrarium grown Heliamphora are usually better good-looking than greenhouse grown ones but I know of some growers that achieved a spectacular coloration in their greenhouse. Look at Cédric's plants for instance:
http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=45837

Here is the conservatory spot where I am currently growing my Heliamphora:
http://carnivorousoc...hytes-wall.html
The wall is east to north east exposed. The roof is made of polycarbonate. The Heliamphora have been there for about 1 month and a half now and the plants are already producing new pitchers. I don't know how they will look like (color speaking) though. The dull weeks we had here in northen Europe certainly didn't help ;-)
The problem is that my setup is new and I don't really know how things will evolve. I guess I will have to wait a full season -a sunny summer and a chilly winter- then I'll see if the plants will be as colorful as I want tem to be.
Eventually, I will able to change their place in the conservatory.

Again, thank you very much for your help.

All the best,

François.

#8 Sockhom

 
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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:21 AM

Hello Urs, Martin and Will9,

Thank you for your comments and advices.
Indeed Martin, all the Heliamphora species have not the same lights requirements and I have set my plants following what I know of their habitat. However, I'd like to know if the very coloured species like H. purpurescens actually needed a few to many hours of full sun to achieve their full coloration or if a very bright spot would be enough for this.

Will9, it looks like your plants manage to get nice colours despite being in a quite shady environment: well done.

Urs, I know that many growers consider that terrarium grown Heliamphora are usually better good-looking than greenhouse grown ones but I know of some growers that achieved a spectacular coloration in their greenhouse. Look at Cédric's plants for instance:
http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=45837

Here is the conservatory spot where I am currently growing my Heliamphora:
http://carnivorousoc...hytes-wall.html
The wall is east to north east exposed. The roof is made of polycarbonate. The Heliamphora have been there for about 1 month and a half now and the plants are already producing new pitchers. I don't know how they will look like (color speaking) though. The dull weeks we had here in northen Europe certainly didn't help ;-)
The problem is that my setup is new and I don't really know how things will evolve. I guess I will have to wait a full season -a sunny summer and a chilly winter- then I'll see if the plants will be as colorful as I want tem to be.
Eventually, I will able to change their place in the conservatory.

Again, thank you very much for your help.

All the best,

François.

#9 chimanta

 
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Posted 09 May 2012 - 13:57 PM

Hello Francois

Nice colours on Cedrics plants indeed!

But a question and you might now the anser: he has builded his greenhouse lately, so does that mean the helis where before inside his house under artificial light or in a greenhouse before already where they got the nice colours?

Are you misting your plants automatically in the new compartement? Since I would be a bit afraid, that humidity in your Wintergarden could be a bit low elsehow?

Best regards and good growing!

Urs

Edited by chimanta, 09 May 2012 - 14:02 PM.