Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

When should I see new growth in Drosera?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Carnivine

 
Carnivine
  • Full Members
  • 297 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham
  • Interests:Land Rover, Range Rover & carnivorous plants.
 

Posted 16 April 2012 - 16:50 PM

I am now seeing a good amount of new growth on my Sarracenia, Dionaea and Pinguicula. However, only a very few of my Drosera are sprouting new growth. Is this normal or have I kept them too wet over winter and they have simply rotted away? For example, D Slackii is just a mound of brown dead looking foliage, no new growth at all.

#2 Ordovic

 
Ordovic
  • Full Members
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cambridgeshire, UK
  • Interests:This, that and the other.
 

Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:12 AM

Hi,
What other's are you growing and where?
Don't have much experience with D. slackii myself, but I can tell you that in my experience (in an unheated greenhouse) rotundifolia & anglica wake up before Sarracenia, D. filiformis at about the same time and I'm just starting to see the first signs of life from binata (sprouting from the roots I believe, having been killed off by winter chill).

#3 Carnivine

 
Carnivine
  • Full Members
  • 297 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham
  • Interests:Land Rover, Range Rover & carnivorous plants.
 

Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:47 AM

I am growing D Capensis, Aliciae, Filiformis, Binata, all in an unheated greenhouse.

#4 Stu

 
Stu
  • Full Members
  • 117 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ramsgate, Kent, UK
 

Posted 17 April 2012 - 20:28 PM

In my unheated greenhouse, here is my experience with those varieties...

D. slackii is only just starting to put on new growth - they didn't die back but stopped growing and rested over winter with some browning leaves.

D. binata is starting to take off, growing back from the healthy thick roots after the cold winter killed back the leaves.

D. capensis is in full growth now after dying back a bit to a resting crown.

D. aliciae is similar to slackii - resting over winter and now putting on new growth. Some flower stalks just starting to emerge on these too.

Hope that helps. Remember that slackii, capensis & aliciae come from south Africa and are not as adapted to cold winters as filiformis and some varieties of binata are.

Edited by Stu, 17 April 2012 - 20:30 PM.


#5 Carnivine

 
Carnivine
  • Full Members
  • 297 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham
  • Interests:Land Rover, Range Rover & carnivorous plants.
 

Posted 18 April 2012 - 18:01 PM

In my unheated greenhouse, here is my experience with those varieties...

D. slackii is only just starting to put on new growth - they didn't die back but stopped growing and rested over winter with some browning leaves.

D. binata is starting to take off, growing back from the healthy thick roots after the cold winter killed back the leaves.

D. capensis is in full growth now after dying back a bit to a resting crown.

D. aliciae is similar to slackii - resting over winter and now putting on new growth. Some flower stalks just starting to emerge on these too.

Hope that helps. Remember that slackii, capensis & aliciae come from south Africa and are not as adapted to cold winters as filiformis and some varieties of binata are.



#6 Carnivine

 
Carnivine
  • Full Members
  • 297 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham
  • Interests:Land Rover, Range Rover & carnivorous plants.
 

Posted 18 April 2012 - 18:03 PM

Many thanks - i will not throw them out just yet then.

#7 ada

 
ada
  • Full Members
  • 1,521 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:sheffield
  • Interests:"green sarracenia"
 

Posted 18 April 2012 - 18:10 PM

I used to grow d.filiformis up here (sheffield)but got fed up of it rotting off nearly every winter,or coming out of hibernation early and going mouldy so gave up with it.
ada

#8 gardenofeden

 
gardenofeden
  • Full Members
  • 4,558 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:York, England
 

Posted 18 April 2012 - 18:36 PM

I agree Ada, they nearly always rot off in late winter up here...