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Darlingtonia flowers aborting


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#1 Richard Bunn

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 14:29 PM

Hi everyone.

Can y'all take a look at the post in the Darlingtonia section regarding flower buds aborting. Someone posted it last year and I experienced it (and this season too).

Unfortunately it didn't get a reply. This glitch in growing it is really starting to tick me off.

Thanks

Richard

#2 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 14:48 PM

I've heard it said that flower buds abort over winter if plants are kept too warm.

#3 Richard Bunn

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 20:02 PM

I've heard it said that flower buds abort over winter if plants are kept too warm.


Hmm I could give a yes and a no answer to mine. I grow it outdoors in Ireland. But the past couple of weeks have been really warm and sunny and I hadn't thought to daily flush the pot with cool water. Could that be it?

#4 meizwang

 
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Posted 03 April 2012 - 01:30 AM

Tough to say what's going on without a picture. Sometimes, plants abort their flowers because they:
1) were stressed in the previous season's growth
2) Have an influx of nutrients in the medium
3) are under suboptimal conditions (ie. poor light)
4) Extreme Temperature fluctuations
5) Exposure to ethylene gas (the gas that's given off by ripening fruit and/or decomposing matter)
6) Have limited resources stored in the plant and decide to put the nutrients in the growth point instead of the flower for survival purposes.
7) have poor genetics (F-2 sarracenias give me this problem sometimes)
8) Went into transplant shock, but by the time it recovered, it was too late and the plant decided to lose the flower.

The list probably goes on and on-if you can describe the growing conditions in the previous year and current year, perhaps we can get a better clue as to what's going on.

Edited by meizwang, 03 April 2012 - 01:31 AM.