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Construction of a half-barrel bog garden.


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#41 WhenIWake

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 14:27 PM

Need to get the barrel ordered and start mine!

#42 Deadly Weapon

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 23:06 PM

That Utri seems U. bisquamata for me. I have one blooming at the moment.

#43 TheInactiveMoth

 
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Posted 21 June 2012 - 06:31 AM

Yup, U. bisquamata...
...nice setup by the way! :tu:

#44 Marlon

 
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Posted 21 June 2012 - 09:16 AM

Looks like a bisquamata to me but i'm not an expert either

#45 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 21 June 2012 - 21:32 PM

Thanks all - I have a few questions:

1. Do I need to do anything with the Utric? Can I just leave it where it is to get on with it?

2. Can I use the moss that's growing in the old CP mix? It looks good but would like to be sure that it won't overrun the CPs.

3. I've noticed over the last few days that the drosera I've planted out have almost no "dew". Is that something I should be concerned about? It has rained, but even after a dry couple of days there was almost none.

Cheers all,
MBE

#46 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 24 June 2012 - 16:56 PM

Did a bit more planting today as nothing bad has happened to those already out:

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#47 mantrid

 
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Posted 24 June 2012 - 17:13 PM

Nice job.
Some sphagnum moss and petrified wood would give it a more natural look and hide that ugly perlite.

#48 linuxman

 
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Posted 24 June 2012 - 17:25 PM

Thanks all - I have a few questions:

1. Do I need to do anything with the Utric? Can I just leave it where it is to get on with it?

2. Can I use the moss that's growing in the old CP mix? It looks good but would like to be sure that it won't overrun the CPs.

3. I've noticed over the last few days that the drosera I've planted out have almost no "dew". Is that something I should be concerned about? It has rained, but even after a dry couple of days there was almost none.

Cheers all,
MBE

I'll try a few answers -
1. I would think so. Sometimes utrics can become weeds in collections.

2. That moss is not sphagnum. Personally I wouldn't use it. When I find it in my pots I pull it out, but I don't know if it's actually harmful.

3. You can always get the dew back on a sundew by increasing the humidity for a while. A plastic bag or half a plastic bottle over a pot can be quite effective. I have D. rotundifolia outside and they're not very dewy either :roll:

#49 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 24 June 2012 - 17:47 PM

Nice job.
Some sphagnum moss and petrified wood would give it a more natural look and hide that ugly perlite.


Cheers. I don't think there'll be space for wood, as I have more plants to go in yet. I'm hoping the moss will spread from the little clumps that are round some of the plants, as the only other stuff I have is dead, I think.

#50 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 24 June 2012 - 17:50 PM

I'll try a few answers -
1. I would think so. Sometimes utrics can become weeds in collections.

2. That moss is not sphagnum. Personally I wouldn't use it. When I find it in my pots I pull it out, but I don't know if it's actually harmful.

3. You can always get the dew back on a sundew by increasing the humidity for a while. A plastic bag or half a plastic bottle over a pot can be quite effective. I have D. rotundifolia outside and they're not very dewy either :roll:


Thank you. I think I'll just have to get used to the fact that outside sundews won't have as much dew. Especially if it keeps on raining like it has. :(

If it's not a problem for the plant, it's not a problem for me. :thumbsup:

Edited by mrbadexample, 24 June 2012 - 17:50 PM.


#51 Mujician

 
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Posted 06 July 2012 - 06:27 AM

Can I ask where you got the barrel from for just 16 quid?!

#52 ada

 
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Posted 06 July 2012 - 06:35 AM

Garden centers around us sell them regularly.
ada

#53 Mujician

 
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Posted 06 July 2012 - 10:42 AM

Yeah, my local GC has them too, but they are 30 quid! I know where I can get one from with some discount too but it will still be more than 16 quid!!

#54 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 06 July 2012 - 11:05 AM

Can I ask where you got the barrel from for just 16 quid?!


Yes you may.

Here.

Seems a bit far from Ilkeston, but if there was something else you're after it might be worth a trip. They have a mighty fine selection of stuff.

Edit: Looks like you could have it delivered for £23.93 all in.

Edited by mrbadexample, 06 July 2012 - 11:09 AM.


#55 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 22 August 2012 - 18:27 PM

A few recent photos:

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I also made a cage for it because I want to keep bees out as much as possible. I like bees - I have a couple of bee hotels and need them to pollinate my veg. So it's a bit of a conflict of interest if the plants keep eating them. It also keeps birds and next-door-neighbour's-children's-footballs off.

Posted Image

I've got a bit of damage from wind, slugs and snails, but mostly it's faring pretty well I think. :dance3:

#56 Random

 
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Posted 16 September 2012 - 16:04 PM

Lovely setup! It will look even better when the varius mosses occupy the surface.
By the way, that moss you first showed us is carpet moss and is not usable for bog gardens, since it grows very fast and forms clumped, thick bases beneath the surface that can suffocate other plants. I see it a lot in the mountains around here. It grows along with Sphagnum and sometimes forms carpets, and in a matter of months the sphagnum is gone and only this moss is left - it's very invasive.
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#57 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 18 October 2012 - 20:51 PM

Winter approaches.

So, what do I do now? How cold does it need to get before I think about putting it to bed for the winter? My first thoughts were to pile a foot or so of straw on the top of it, and then leave it be until about March.

The sarracenia are looking a bit sorry for themselves - they've been blown all over the shop by the strong winds. I believe I need to cut these down to about an inch above the substrate level? :moderator: Does the same go for the purpurea in the middle, or is that best left? How about the other plants?

What sort of water level am I looking to maintain over winter?

Some help with what to do next would be much appreciated. I'll grab a current photo tomorrow if I get chance (i.e. remember). :whistle3:

Cheers all.
MBE :biggrin:

#58 billynomates666

 
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Posted 19 October 2012 - 12:38 PM

Hi MBE

I seldom cut the pitchers off but I do tidy, i.e. cut off any brown material back to healthy green.leaves, preferring not to cut off any green material that can photosynthasise and help the plant. the purp should be OK as the pitchers last a couple of years, again just cut off any brown and dead material. Drosera and VFTs similar treatment. Thats just the way I do it, I know others cut them right back and have equal success.

Water level, the wisdom is to keep them just moist (almost impossible outside I know) I syphon off excess water if I think about it, but in reality seldom do and it doesnt seem to hurt them.

Now the vexed question of protection, I personnaly steer clear of straw and the like as if it is outside and gets wet, it compacts, remains soggy and provides a great breediong ground for disease, fungus and goodness knows what. I loosely cover with two or three layers of fern crosiers around the rhizomes so the rhizomes can breathe and whats left of the leaves photosynthasise, The VFTs get fully covered but dont suffer and are generally (unless badly frozen over winter) green when uncovered. You could insulate teh barell if you wanted to, to help in the deep freeze periods.

Watch out for the desiccating winds, it tends to be that that does the damage, the wind removes the moisture from the leaves, which if the ground is frozen, the roots cant replace and it effectively freeze dries the plant.

Cheers
steve

Edit
Just remembered you have the super dooper drain valve dont you, in which case I would be tempted to leave it open all winter and just water if the substrate starts to dry out.

Edited by billynomates666, 19 October 2012 - 12:54 PM.


#59 mrbadexample

 
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Posted 22 October 2012 - 15:24 PM

Thanks as always Steve.

This is what it looks like at the moment:

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I agree with your thoughts about straw - it will almost certainly end up a soggy mass on top of everything. I can get hold of some ferns without much trouble so I'll try that. Does it matter if they're green or brown?

I'm sure I can find something to insulate the actual barrel. Some bubble wrap or something.

#60 billynomates666

 
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Posted 23 October 2012 - 08:04 AM

Hi MBE

Green or brown is no problem, if green, they brown up over autumn and winter and the pinna (leafy fingers) are just starting to fall off in March when you remove them, so they work quite well.

Cheers
Steve
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