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algae on top of your Cephalotus soil *edit* with new pictures


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#1 Swerfer

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 11:34 AM

Hi

I was wondering if there are ways to prevent or get rid of algae, on Cephalotus substrate. The algae probably do not harm the plants in any way, but it takes away the flair of Cephalotus. At least, that is my opinion. I don’t have algae on all my Cephalotus soil, but some do. What I can’t seem to understand is why some soils turns green and others stay the way they are long after you repot.
For example, I did some divisions a few weeks ago. Therefore I use transparent plastic bags around the plants, for high humidity, for it to root properly. It takes a few months before they are acclimatized. I use a very aerated soil with peat and perlite. This time I did not mix sand in my substrate, because they also say that sand makes soil alkali and thus makes algae grow more/better. But on top of these plant divisions all perlite grains are turning green from algae. Does high humidity affect this?
Are there ways to prevent this or make it go away, without harming your Cephalotus?
Should your soil mix be sterilized before use, for example steam sterilization or by putting it in the oven for a few hours? What is your experience?

Regards,

Youri

As I mentioned before, the algae probably does not harm the plant, but it takes away the flair of Cephalotus this size. Maybe this is just a pre-stadium of moss

Pictures show, Ceph division in three week old soil, note the algae

http://www.flytrapca...le.php?id=13769
http://www.flytrapca...le.php?id=13770

Edited by Swerfer, 24 March 2012 - 07:00 AM.


#2 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 12:14 PM

Could you post some pictures? Because what you describe just doesn't sound like Algae.

#3 mobile

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 12:19 PM

In my experience, the green stuff is moss, not algae. It is naturally dormant in the peat, and also carries in the air. It likes to grow in wet humid conditions. I have tried sterilising growing media in the microwave, which is very effective at sterilisation, to such an extent that the media becomes a perfect host for such undesirables as fungus. In nearly every case, when using sterilised media in wet conditions, I have had fungal growth in it.

#4 Gekon

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 13:49 PM

Mobile- What do you mean by sterilising in microwave? How long and at what power do you do that?

#5 mobile

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 13:54 PM

Mobile- What do you mean by sterilising in microwave? How long and at what power do you do that?

As I stated, I would not advise sterilising soil, as it will make it a breeding ground for undesirables.

#6 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 21:49 PM

As Karl has said the green stuff is simply moss,if it ever gets dense you can simply remove it with your fingers.Your plant looks perfectly healthy.

#7 mantrid

 
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Posted 23 March 2012 - 22:42 PM

CPs live in damp conditions, algae and moss will naturally occur when you recreate these conditions. Theres little you can do except maybe start growith cacti

#8 meizwang

 
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Posted 28 March 2012 - 18:21 PM

Hi

I was wondering if there are ways to prevent or get rid of algae, on Cephalotus substrate.


It's tough to prevent algae/moss from growing on the substrate without chemical sprays. As for moss, you probably can't prevent it, but to prevent the green-slime algae, when you transplant, carefully wash the whole plant very thoroughly so no medium is left. Provided you didn't damage the roots and the plant is already acclimated to outdoor conditions and the temperatures are not too hot outside, you can keep the freshly potted plant outdoors in full sun-green slime won't grow under these conditions (under mediterranean climates), even if it's present in the soil.

Edited by meizwang, 28 March 2012 - 18:24 PM.