Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Extra light needed?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Madball

 
Madball
  • Full Members
  • 41 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Netherlands
 

Posted 11 March 2012 - 22:50 PM

Hi people,

I want some oppinions on extra lighting first i try to sketch the situation. In my room there is a big window 3x2metres at the south/east side and that's the only place where i can really have my plants and I'm growing some Pinguicula,Drosera, A heliamphora, A ceph and some utricularia. Now im wondering if i should add some extra lighting? Because iknow a south window is perfect but it's impossible here.

And if so yes what would you recommend me to get as lighting? I've heard some people use a 840 + a 865 fluorescent tube and that will do the trick or you got some other ideas for me? I wanna prevent that my plants arent getting enough light. Well at the moment I'm not afraid because spring is coming and days are getting longer by the day but I just wanna be prepared for winter! :sun_bespectacled:

Thanks alot in forward!

#2 sabulba

 
sabulba
  • Members
  • 30 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:jaipur
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 04:59 AM

hi..
this is good idea in order to make your plant healthy in different weather conditions, and i hope this will work.

#3 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 07:43 AM

I had a similar situation when I first started to grow CPs and I solved it with using a 70W metal halide flood light. While it's not a very high wattage, it was enough to supplement the light already available from the window. My plants used to grow really well, with some of my Utricularia flowered year round and my Heliamphora had great nectar spoons.

#4 Madball

 
Madball
  • Full Members
  • 41 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Netherlands
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 19:53 PM

I had a similar situation when I first started to grow CPs and I solved it with using a 70W metal halide flood light. While it's not a very high wattage, it was enough to supplement the light already available from the window. My plants used to grow really well, with some of my Utricularia flowered year round and my Heliamphora had great nectar spoons.


Thanks for the awnser! Yeah they do it pretty ok, But its not superb! I still live at my parents but got a pretty big room with the best window for Cp's in the house so happy with that. Doesnt a Metal Halide lamp get very hot? or am I confused with another kind of lamp?

If you have links with a webshop post it please =) Can't really find the good things on the internet because I don't have enough knowledge yet.

Greetings

Edited by Madball, 20 March 2012 - 19:57 PM.


#5 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 20:48 PM

I'm not sure if they make the one I have anymore, as I've had it for a few years. It looks similar to this one though: http://bit.ly/GEeknx

Yes, they get hot, so need to keep them a distance away from the plants. Mine was approximately 1.2m above the bench.

#6 manders

 
manders
  • Full Members
  • 2,890 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cheshire
  • Interests:Neps
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 21:57 PM

Havent tried one yet but have been looking at LED floodlights, they seem to be more efficient than metal halides and should therefore run cooler, IP65 rated as well so also good for greenhouses/terrariums possibly. Anyone tried them? Just ordered a 10w one to try it out.

#7 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 22:03 PM

The good thing about metal halides is the spectral distribution. Both fluorescent lamps and white LEDs use phosphors which produce peaks at very specific wavelengths and not necessarily those ideal for plants.

#8 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 22:03 PM

The good thing about metal halides is the spectral distribution. Both fluorescent lamps and white LEDs use phosphors which produce peaks at very specific wavelengths and not necessarily those ideal for plants.

#9 manders

 
manders
  • Full Members
  • 2,890 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cheshire
  • Interests:Neps
 

Posted 20 March 2012 - 22:46 PM

The warm white leds are very different to the cool whites also, warm whites seem better from the colour spectrum. Dont metal halides peak out at exactly the wrong wavelengths?

#10 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 21 March 2012 - 08:03 AM

Dont metal halides peak out at exactly the wrong wavelengths?

As with flourescents and LED, I think this depends on the type. If you take a look at the photometrics for THIS metal halide, you'll see that it has a relatively even spectral distribution and includes the chlorophyll absorption bands. Colour temperature plays a role and I always use 942 (4200 K) ceramic metal halide lamps.

#11 Madball

 
Madball
  • Full Members
  • 41 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Netherlands
 

Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:24 AM

But no one knows a webshop with a good basic starter lamp? Other kinds are ok too! =)

#12 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,417 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 21 March 2012 - 12:04 PM

But no one knows a webshop with a good basic starter lamp? Other kinds are ok too! =)

You need to decide on what type of light you want to use. Both fluorescent fittings and metal halides are readily available and LED lighting is becoming increasingly available, as they are popular with aquarists and, as manders siad, they are now being used for flood lights. Often 'specialist' lighting can be available from more common sources, for less money.

#13 Madball

 
Madball
  • Full Members
  • 41 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Netherlands
 

Posted 21 March 2012 - 15:12 PM

You need to decide on what type of light you want to use. Both fluorescent fittings and metal halides are readily available and LED lighting is becoming increasingly available, as they are popular with aquarists and, as manders siad, they are now being used for flood lights. Often 'specialist' lighting can be available from more common sources, for less money.


Ok I'll check around a bit, Thanks for your help Mobile and the others ofcourse also.