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Cephalotus variety


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#1 RL7836

 
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Posted 27 February 2012 - 16:44 PM

For a number of years I've only grown HG Cephs. However, in the past two years (or so), I decided to add some genetic diversity and acquired several other plants. Since most of these plants are in the same conditions (under lights in back basement room - temps currently in low 50's*F and are flowering size (or close)) - I thought it might be interesting to try to compare a few of them.

First up is the "German Giant" - not flowering size and also not in the back basement room. It's still in the basement - just not in the colder back room. So far, an unremarkable clone ... (imo)(Hopefully this will change in time ...)
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Next up is one of my favorites - I received it labeled as "Squat". It has proven to be a very vigorous grower with some interesting coloration (that I'm not really able to capture in a camera). The 1st pic shows the clump of pitchers with the top two having nectar covering their peristomes** & the second shows the general shape of a pitcher:
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This next pic is the primary reason for my post. When I wander into that cramped nasty little room every week to water these guys, I thought I noticed a significant difference in the size & shape of the teeth of the peristome (there's also multiple other differences - like under-lid design, mid-rib width, colors, etc - but the differences in the teeth grabbed me). The pitchers are a bit different in size but not by a lot. I'll be interested to see if these differences remain ... ("Squat" on left & 'Hummer's Giant' on right):
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Here's a comparison of a "Czech Giant" (left) and a full grown seedling from a selfed HG Ceph. These plants were potted into the same size pot with the same media mix over a year ago and have remained side-by-side since (outside for summer & winter under lights). In addition to the obvious color differences, the Czech plant has kept all it's pitchers while the seedgrown plant has done the 'winter thing' and mostly moved to non-carnivorous leaves. The SG plant has also retained the robust peristome teeth and wide mid-rib from it's parents (while the Czech plant has neither).
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For anyone who is doubting the viability of the Ceph seeds in the ICPS seedbank this fall - pic from yesterday (as mentioned in another thread, this pot will likely find it's way into the NASC auction):
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** I'm assuming that I can call the pitcher-rim area on a Ceph - the peristome - like a Nep. If not, you still get the idea ... :sun_bespectacled:

#2 Marcus B

 
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Posted 27 February 2012 - 22:19 PM

Things like colouration and the markings under the lid can vary greatly within plants of the same clone grown next to each other. That said, tendency towards certain colouration and pattern seems to be passed on. After all, that is why we would all like to have an EB, or descendent of EB, in our collection. Morphology does tend to change, but again it appears that the tendency to show certain morphology distinguishes clones.

I have a range of plants from different sources and varying clones and some plants exhibit pitcher shapes that are different to the plants that they grow along side of, and even differ from plants in the same communal pot. I have noticed that some plants tend to produce fairly normal looking pitchers after having been seen to be different. However, the distinguishing shape re-occurs in other pitchers produced under the same conditions, so there is definately something to this.

If it was not for this variation in varieties we would not bother having any more than one type of Ceph in our collections.

#3 carni grower

 
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Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:15 AM

Stunning cephalotus.

#4 mikaazzon

 
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Posted 11 March 2012 - 14:46 PM

really beautiful cephalotus :heart:

#5 meizwang

 
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Posted 19 March 2012 - 23:32 PM

excellent post!

#6 luc06

 
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Posted 14 June 2012 - 19:03 PM

Cephalotus is really beautiful

#7 Blocky71

 
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Posted 14 June 2012 - 20:54 PM

Great thread, i'm a big ceph fan although i only have 2 typical plants at the mo.
I was reading recently how some owners were dissapointed with their clone varieties as they wern't showing any real characteristics.
The conclusions were that the plants characteristics were hugely reliant on the conditions/climate they were grown in, I.E you could have two identical clones that were grown in different areas that would look very different.
I guess this would mean that a typical kept in prime conditions/climate would produce superior looking pitchers to say a Hummer that wasn't.
To my inexperienced eye i would have said my ceph's could have passed for Eden blacks at the end of last summer as the pitchers had gone so dark, i've also seen varieties being listed as big boy and hummer on ebay that to be honest looked no different to typicals?.
Ooooh i feel a nice grid style photo showing the different clones and their distinguishing features is needed....
Now who here is a whizz with their photoshop?

#8 Blocky71

 
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Posted 14 June 2012 - 20:55 PM

Oh and forgot to say, lovely plants......

#9 Marcus B

 
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Posted 14 June 2012 - 22:53 PM

Ooooh i feel a nice grid style photo showing the different clones and their distinguishing features is needed....
Now who here is a whizz with their photoshop?


I took photos of my different plants on the weekend. I am planning to put together a series of photos comparing what I have. I have one of my typical plants that is giving my Giants big competition for pitcher size after I set it up to grow vertically. I will post the photos when I can.

#10 Blocky71

 
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Posted 15 June 2012 - 17:13 PM

Looking forward to your pics Marcus

#11 Jozef Havrilcak

 
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Posted 22 June 2012 - 18:28 PM

uff your "Squat" :lookeye: great i want this clone :Laie_71mini: !!!

#12 Veek

 
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Posted 22 June 2012 - 21:13 PM

He lives in the USA WeXi that's gonna be a little bit difficult. :thumright:
I am still looking forward to Marcus his pictures to ....

Edited by Veek, 22 June 2012 - 21:14 PM.


#13 Jozef Havrilcak

 
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Posted 27 June 2012 - 15:17 PM

I know Veek but maybe someone who finds them grown in the EU and the United Kingdom.

But only maeby :sarcastic_blum:

#14 Marcus B

 
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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:46 AM

He lives in the USA WeXi that's gonna be a little bit difficult. :thumright:
I am still looking forward to Marcus his pictures to ....


There are 40 photos loaded into a Galley called "Ceph variety". I will link them to this thread at a later date.

Some of the Allen Lowrie plants will be the same as I received cuttings from 10 clones, but ended up with 14 plants. I am not sure which ones are the same, especially as two are still only putting out small pitchers, most of which are juvenile in form.

The Phil Mann plants are all different to each other.

The Walpole plants, from Primal Plants, are from two different plants from the Walpole region. One colours up more readily than the other.

It will be interesting to see what my seedlings grow to look like as I tried to cross a few clones.

Enjoy!

#15 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 05:56 AM

These pictures are just of the variation with in my collection, which is mostly due to sourcing plants from a range of growers. Only the "Giant" could be called a cultivar, as it is reportedly the same plant as "Hummer Giant" but from material distrubuted before the cultivar was named. Therefore, strictly speaking the rest are all typicals, but as such show variation in how well they colour up, shape of the pitcher lid, curviture of the lid (doming) and shape of the pitcher both in regards to side view and front view, with some seeming to only produce squat pitchers and others narrow pitchers.

The plants are all growing together, but not all in identical media. One of my plants, labelled as typical (from my orginal plant) is growing on treefern (see vertical growing thread) and is producing pitchers that are larger than typical sizes quoted, thus showing how conditions can influence size.

Typical - A very hardy clone from Triffid Park
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Same clone on treefern
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Squat "Giant" pitcher. Pitchers on this clone are wide, but vary from squat to just larger with normal proportions.
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So called "Red form", which is really nothing different to the typical. It is my understanding that it originates from the same stock as my main clone.
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 06:06 AM.


#16 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:18 AM

Both of my Walpole plants have very domed lids that appear to be typical of plants from this region.
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Peter Edward's clone - A plant that used always pip my "Giant" for first prize in shows. It is normally very colourful and has improved in it redness since these photos were taken. Peter no longer grows it, but it has been distrubuted to ensure it is not lost.
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 06:20 AM.


#17 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:36 AM

I have read references to clone "Phil Mann", including from people who are particularly after that clone. However, Phil sells a lot of plants from various material, as he is permitted to collect leaves from wild plants. When buying plants from him I was not sure if they would all be the same clone, or different. However, time has shown the three I bought to hold particular differences from one another.

Narrow pitchered clone
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Yellow-orange leaf clone - As the leaf starts to die it changes to a yellowish colour first instead of going darker or just fading. I thought that it was due to some lack of nutrients but, though fed the same as other plants and potted up in the same mix, the trait persists.
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Squatish clone
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 06:39 AM.


#18 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:52 AM

I bought 10 clones from Allen Lowrie, who grows 100 different clones. He sent me cuttings of the most variable plants in his main collection. None of them are named so I have simply numbered them to keep track of individual plants. When unpacking them I found 14 plants but I failed to note which where duplicates, so some of these are repeats of the same clone, but I do not know which they are. Hopefully time will tell.

Some have dippled non-carnivourous leaves others smooth surfaced leaves, while the pitchers look much the same. Others have endented lids or colour up more readily than the rest.

AL 1 The fastest growing clone. Most likely as it was the biggest piece and put in the biggest pot. It gets a lot of red spots. Most likely due to sun on the water droplets on the leaves.
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AL 2
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AL 3
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 07:33 AM.


#19 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 07:03 AM

More Allen Lowrie plants.
AL4
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AL 5
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AL 6
Still waiting for this one to throw a decent sized pitcher. It suffered a fungal attack when I first potted it up and has only branched and produced immature pitcher since.
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AL 7
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 07:21 AM.


#20 Marcus B

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 07:09 AM

Still more Allen Lowrie plants.
AL8
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AL9
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AL10
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Edited by Marcus B, 02 July 2012 - 07:22 AM.