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Help with Tuberous Sundews


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#1 nadja77

 
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Posted 18 February 2012 - 14:55 PM

I have a small collection of tuberous drosera consisting of D. auriculata, various forms of D. menziesii and D. peltata. Being primarily a Nepenthes grower, I have not been too methodical in looking after them, and as it seems the plants are all growing in the wrong season. We are heading for winter, and some of the plants are beginning to flower. I know that they should have spent the summer dormant, and would begin their growing season just about now. How do I get the plants to change their cycle without causing them to take too much strain? I would like to start growing more tuberous sundews, and want to have all plants 'in sync' for the next growing season.

Thanks!
Nadja

#2 Zlatokrt

 
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Posted 18 February 2012 - 16:03 PM

Similar problem is, when someone from northern hemisphere buys tubers from Australia. I have done such two or three times so far and all of them rearranged their life cycles according our conditions within two or three years. You just have to keep them growing when they grow (i keep my plants in the cellar to prevent too high temps).
E.g.: i buy a tuber, it starts to grow in march and grows till july or august. Then it is dormant, but not the whole 6 months, it starts to grow again in december or january. Again, it goes dormant in june and the dormancy ends with the rest of the "normal" tubers and grows together with them during winter.

#3 nadja77

 
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Posted 19 February 2012 - 06:44 AM

Similar problem is, when someone from northern hemisphere buys tubers from Australia. I have done such two or three times so far and all of them rearranged their life cycles according our conditions within two or three years. You just have to keep them growing when they grow (i keep my plants in the cellar to prevent too high temps).
E.g.: i buy a tuber, it starts to grow in march and grows till july or august. Then it is dormant, but not the whole 6 months, it starts to grow again in december or january. Again, it goes dormant in june and the dormancy ends with the rest of the "normal" tubers and grows together with them during winter.


Thanks for the reply! I am not sure how long the plants take to complete the transition into dormancy. So if I let them go dormant now, when they have finished flowering, and try to bring them out of dormancy in about June that would give them roughly a 3-4 months rest period? We still get hot days now, but it is definitely getting colder, how important is temperature to trigger dormancy? Is it enough to just let the pots gradually dry out? Lots of questions... :)

#4 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 19 February 2012 - 07:51 AM

you can't force dormancy, let the plants grow as they want to and they will eventually align themselves with your seasons. D.auriculata and peltata do not need to dry out completely, which makes them easier than most, and they do not seem exclusively winter growers...they grow and flower well into mid summer for me

#5 nadja77

 
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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:30 AM

you can't force dormancy, let the plants grow as they want to and they will eventually align themselves with your seasons. D.auriculata and peltata do not need to dry out completely, which makes them easier than most, and they do not seem exclusively winter growers...they grow and flower well into mid summer for me


Thanks Stephen. I'll just let them do their thing then. What happens with the bulbs once the plant has completed the transition? Is it best to dig them up and store away, or just leave them in the pot until the next growing season?

#6 Dieter

 
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Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:18 AM

Hi Nadja,

I usually keep the tubers potted but others prefer to store them in ziplock bags. You probably need to find out what works best for you.

Best regards
Dieter

#7 nadja77

 
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Posted 20 February 2012 - 16:51 PM

Hi Dieter,

I think it would be better for the tubers to stay in the soil until I get the hang of things. I'll dig up a few D. peltata tubers just to try, and leave the others in their pots. I am still fairly new to growing these drosera and will probably end up killing a few before I get it right but I've got to start somewhere. :happy:
Thanks for your reply!

Edited by nadja77, 20 February 2012 - 16:58 PM.