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P. spec. Minas des Asbestos


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#1 dvg

 
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Posted 31 January 2012 - 00:16 AM

This rare and small Mexican Pinguicula species is starting to color up well under the lights.

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A few springtail/bloodworm feedings have helped it to put on some size in the last couple of months.

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Looking forward to seeing how this one matures. :sun_bespectacled:

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#2 Miloslav Macháček

 
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Posted 31 January 2012 - 00:58 AM

Thats a one nice little ping! First time hearing about this spec. :smile:

#3 Tuuagso

 
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Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:48 AM

Amazing!!
I hope mine gets like this, beautiful!

#4 Zagato

 
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Posted 31 January 2012 - 09:48 AM

Nice color!
Never see it before!

#5 Fernando Rivadavia

 
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Posted 07 February 2012 - 05:34 AM

Looks like something from the ehlersiae-esseriana-jamauvensis complex. Please post flower pics if you have any.

Fernando

#6 Markus

 
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Posted 14 February 2012 - 08:47 AM

Looks like something from the ehlersiae-esseriana-jamauvensis complex. Please post flower pics if you have any.

Fernando

P. from Minas des Asbestos is very similar to P. esseriana. The flower is pale violet to white with some violet stripes on the backside of the petals.
There is another related species P. sp. El Mirador that is quite similar and they only differ from the amount of the stripes on the backside of the petals.
I have to surch at home if I ever take a photo of these two plants.

Cheers,
Markus

#7 jimscott

 
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Posted 14 February 2012 - 14:43 PM

Gneiss colour!

#8 mobile

 
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Posted 14 February 2012 - 20:10 PM

Nice Pinguicula, though I wouldn't want to spend long in the location 'Minas des Asbestos'

#9 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 15 February 2012 - 20:11 PM

Very nice plant - and nicely taken pictures!

Luckily it doesn't need asbestos in its soil ;-)

#10 Markus

 
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Posted 01 April 2012 - 19:53 PM

Here are some flower photos to show the differences between P. M.d. Asbe and P. spec. El Mirador.
P. spec. El Mirador looks more like a P. esseriana and P. spec. M.d. Asbe looks like a P. jaumavensis.

P. M.d. Asbe
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P. spec. El Mirador
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Cheers,
Markus

#11 jeff 1

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 13:53 PM

Bonjour

these 2 : P. M.d. Asbe and P. spec. El Mirador. when we see your picture are very close , may be some stripe more red on the spur but it is not a discriminant caracters, the sunlight sometimes increase the colour caracters.


have you make on these 2 species some perenity and reproductibility test ?

it is a species from esseriana-ehlersiae-jaumavensis complex .

for me the jaumavensis and esseriana difference

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at left esseriana at right jaumavensis


see others form from this complex here link

thanks Fernando :likeff_man:

Edited by jeff 1, 02 April 2012 - 14:30 PM.


#12 Markus

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 19:58 PM

for me the jaumavensis and esseriana difference

Jeff, it's a bit too easy to declare the differences between P. esseriana and P. jaumavensis on the basis of two single clones....

I have several P. jaumavensis/esseriana/ehlersiae clones in culture to have more comparison.

The two plants shown in my photos not only differ in colour but also in shape and other habitual characters, e.g. the flower stalk of P. El Mirador is extremely long.

Cheers,
Markus

#13 jeff 1

 
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Posted 04 April 2012 - 13:40 PM

error

Edited by jeff 1, 04 April 2012 - 14:08 PM.


#14 jeff 1

 
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Posted 04 April 2012 - 13:58 PM

Jeff, it's a bit too easy to declare the differences between P. esseriana and P. jaumavensis on the basis of two single clones....

I have several P. jaumavensis/esseriana/ehlersiae clones in culture to have more comparison.

The two plants shown in my photos not only differ in colour but also in shape and other habitual characters, e.g. the flower stalk of P. El Mirador is extremely long.

Cheers,
Markus


Bonjour

for quite some years this is their morphological difference

see also here
link
and here
link

or the AIPC special issue 3 on the mexican pinguicula and others web site ( yours also).

if you have several clone in cultivate , .may be you show these one to compare with the type.

for me these 2 are different to esseriana or jaumavensis I am OK.

"in shape and other habitual characters" can you tell us more .

for the scape( pedoncule, pedicel) some time it is not a discriminant ,many parameters can intervene on their length, can be seen very well ' in situ' .

jeff

Edited by jeff 1, 04 April 2012 - 14:09 PM.


#15 dvg

 
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Posted 20 August 2012 - 17:13 PM

An update on this plant,

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growing in a 4" pot.

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#16 Zlatokrt

 
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Posted 20 August 2012 - 18:03 PM

Wow, thats a nice colour!

#17 dvg

 
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Posted 10 January 2013 - 19:21 PM

Another update on this mexi-ping.

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dvg

#18 mobile

 
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Posted 10 January 2013 - 19:27 PM

Very nice looking plant... I really should grow more Mexican pings :yes:

#19 Rodrigo

 
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Posted 10 January 2013 - 20:13 PM

Beautiful Pinguicula :woot: , the shape of the rosette and its vivid coloring and something very unique in this species of carnivorous plant :good2: .

Best Regards,

Rodrigo

#20 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 11 January 2013 - 00:06 AM

Does this plant form trailing stems in lower light? I used to have this plant called "acension" which looks like P. esseriana, but the rosettes crawl around during winter months. Now I have got something call 1717 (I think) that does the same thing. It is achieving the "crawling" motion by etiolating the stem. The esseriana just sit there as winter rosettes with succulent leaves while these other plants etiolate like crazy and actually crawl toward the lights. In one season, they look the same in the next they look completely different.