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D. spiralis x tomentosa var. tomentosa


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#1 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 07:20 AM

Hi all,

and here is the next one. :P
Last year i menaged to cross D. spiralis ´Diamantina, Minas Gerais´ with D. tomentosa var. tomentosa ´Morro do Jambeiro, Minas Gerais´. The germination rate was relatively high but the seedlings grew really slowly and they have been very weak so i lost all of them except this single plant which is now nearly adult.
The plant is about 4cm in diameter and it has erect leafes, i would have expected it a little bit bigger after D. spiralis was the motherplant.
The lower side of the leafes is hairy and the flower stalk is very similar to the scapes of D. tomentosa var. tomentosa.

Here are the parents:
D. spiralis

and D. tomentosa var. tomentosa ´Morro do Jambeiro, Minas Gerais, Brazil´ (an older picture)
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And now the hybrid:

D. spiralis x D. tomentosa var. tomentosa
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I hope you like them.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O., 15 April 2012 - 00:12 AM.

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#2 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 08:52 AM

Now that's a special one. Pity the mortality rate of the seedlings was so high.

#3 jimscott

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 14:34 PM

Nice looking plants!

#4 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 15:18 PM

very attractive hybrid!

#5 Zlatokrt

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 15:58 PM

Wow! This one is very interesting. Congrats Daniel :tu:
Adam

#6 dudo klasovity

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 20:37 PM

Congrats, Daniel! You are very successful with these sundew crosses. This particular hybrid is one of the most interesting so far! Love its elegant appearance! Thanx

#7 Deadly Weapon

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 20:51 PM

Spectacular hybrid again. Do you have any other interesting hybrids planned or growing?

#8 kisscool_38

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 21:26 PM

That's a really nice hybrid. It looks like a little to Drosera alba. Congrats Daniel!

Regards

Aymeric

#9 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 03 January 2012 - 23:18 PM

Many thanks to all of you.

Aymeric, indeed it´s similar to D. alba, only a little too greenish.

Dusan, in my eyes of course all of them are beauties :smile: but you are right, perhaps it looks more interesting than others.

Sean, yes, it´s really a pity that only one plant survived. But these days i repeated the crossing between these two location forms, so hopefully i will have some more plants in the near future.

Deadly weapon, oh yes, in the moment i do have a few more hybrids i have not shown till now but most of them are still to small. In the past i have crossed some others like for example the very nice D. schwackei x tomentosa var. tomentosa, here is the link if don´t have seen this one: http://www.cpukforum...ei&fromsearch=1
I have not really planned these crossings, if i have the possibility to cross two species because they flower at the same time i cross them. The last few days i tried to cross a few more species and forms.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O., 04 January 2012 - 23:19 PM.


#10 Khelljuhg

 
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Posted 05 January 2012 - 19:20 PM

This one is so interesting. Do you think it will work with either variety of D. filiformis as well (because it looks like a relative of these linear-leaved species)?

Edited by Khelljuhg, 06 January 2012 - 07:25 AM.


#11 Fernando Rivadavia

 
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Posted 05 January 2012 - 19:56 PM

OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Speechless!

#12 Tonk

 
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Posted 05 January 2012 - 21:15 PM

Very interesting hybrid ! The results looks good, and very different than others South-American Drosera !
Congratulations, you are a very good bee (or other inesct pollinator, as you want :D)

Edited by Tonk, 05 January 2012 - 21:16 PM.


#13 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 06 January 2012 - 19:36 PM

Thanks again for your kind words, i´m really happy you like this crossing.

Khelljuhg, it could also work with D. filiformis but i think the other parent should be more closely related.
Till now i did not managed to cross plants from different continents, partially they produced seed which also looked well but it did not germinated at all.

When the first flowers will have opened i will show some pictures of them, hopefully they will be nearly as big as these of D. spiralis.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O., 06 January 2012 - 20:49 PM.


#14 Guest_Andreas Eils_*

 
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Posted 07 January 2012 - 02:20 AM

Dani,

I must say, THAT is your best "crime" so far! :wink: And it has also a nicely hairy flower scape. Brilliant! It´s indeed such a pity you haven´t received more plants than only this one! *sigh* I hope this specimen will last a long time for you (and for us to worship)! :tu:


Andreas

#15 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 09 January 2012 - 18:59 PM

Many thanks Andreas. :thank_you2:
Indeed the flower stalk is very similar to the flower stalks of D. tomentosa var. tomentosa but it´s no wonder after D. spiralis does also have hairy scapes. Next year it will be interesting to see if it will also have folked flower stalks like D. spiralis often has.

Best regards,

Dani

#16 Samoied

 
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Posted 09 January 2012 - 21:13 PM

Wow, that's something quite unexpected!

The plant is beautiful, looks to me like a giant D. schwackeii !

Interesting you note that the seedlings are weak growers despite having a high germination ratio, because in Grão mogol you can see a lot of tomentosa and spiralis growing together and no sign of something like your hybrid.

Thanks and congrats for your efforts in creating these little jewels :)


Adilson

#17 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 22:11 PM

Thanks Adilson.

Perhaps such crossings are too weak to survive in nature.


Instead of D. spiralis from Diamantina i made also the crossing with the form from Itacambira, in this case also good looking seed was produced but there was no germination at all.
Interestingly the reciprocal crossings in both cases have not worked as well nethertheless i was able to collect good looking seed but nothing germinated.
So it could be that perhaps some location forms are capable of hybridisation and others perhaps not and that in a few cases fertile seed is produced while in other cases it´s sterile.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O., 10 January 2012 - 22:13 PM.


#18 Carlos Rohrbacher

 
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Posted 31 January 2012 - 23:11 PM

Great Daniel. I loved! :sun_bespectacled:

#19 Miloslav Macháček

 
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Posted 01 February 2012 - 20:00 PM

Everytime I see photos of Your dews Daniel, I feel...pure envy :biggrin:

#20 Sockhom

 
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Posted 01 February 2012 - 21:00 PM

A stunning plant.
Congratulations Daniel for your work!

François.