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Utricularia paulineae


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#1 MFS

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 03:52 AM

Happy New Year everyone!

My Utricularia paulineae (thanks Sean!) decided to give me an awesome New Year's present and threw up a couple of flowers and a few developing new ones. So here it is to brighten your New Year's Eve.

Posted Image

Enjoy!!!
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#2 MFS

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 04:00 AM

In case anyone is interested:

Pentax K-5 camera.
Pentax DFA 100mm f/2.8 Macro WR lens.
Aperture f/11, shutter speed 1/20th, ISO 80. Shot in natural sunlight (through thin high cloud) coming through a window.

#3 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 04:03 AM

Nice. Mine hasn't flowered in about 7 years.

#4 fischermans

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 07:48 AM

Hello
Nice picture and plant but sorry for me it looks much more like U.uniflora than like U.paulineae.
Regards Alexander

#5 mobile

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 10:08 AM

Wish I could get mine to flower. All it does is makes leaves - slowly.

#6 TheInactiveMoth

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 10:34 AM

How tall are the flower stalks? I still don't actually know... :sarcastic_hand:

#7 jimscott

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 14:46 PM

Pretty flower!

#8 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 15:36 PM

Hello
Nice picture and plant but sorry for me it looks much more like U.uniflora than like U.paulineae.
Regards Alexander


The plant pictured in definitely U. paulineae and originates from Walpole.

#9 fischermans

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 16:05 PM

The plant pictured in definitely U. paulineae and originates from Walpole.

Hello Sean
Why can you be so sure?
This one from Walpole on the picture from Christian Dietz looks quite different and for me more like a real U.paulineae.
1Posted Image
But when you are sure it´s ok for me.Thank you for replying.
Sorry and regards Alexander
PS: Cristian sorry for hitchhicking your picture. :flag_of_truce:

Edited by fischermans, 31 December 2011 - 16:09 PM.


#10 MFS

 
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Posted 31 December 2011 - 22:43 PM

Easy: There is a central yellow palate ridge, which extends slightly beyond the limit of the surrounding ones. Utricularia uniflora, in contrast, has two parallel yellow ridges, terminating at the same level as the surrounding white or purple ones. In addition, the upper corolla lip in U. uniflora is usually emarginate, rather than broadly ovate, and about half the width:length of U. paulineae. I also noticed the floral bracts are narrowly lanceolate to linear in U. uniflora, and widely lanceolate to narrowly ovate in this one (but you can't see this in the photo).

Here is U. uniflora for comparison:

Posted Image

Hello Sean
Why can you be so sure?
This one from Walpole on the picture from Christian Dietz looks quite different and for me more like a real U.paulineae.



#11 fischermans

 
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Posted 01 January 2012 - 00:01 AM

Easy: There is a central yellow palate ridge, which extends slightly beyond the limit of the surrounding ones. Utricularia uniflora, in contrast, has two parallel yellow ridges, terminating at the same level as the surrounding white or purple ones. In addition, the upper corolla lip in U. uniflora is usually emarginate, rather than broadly ovate, and about half the width:length of U. paulineae. I also noticed the floral bracts are narrowly lanceolate to linear in U. uniflora, and widely lanceolate to narrowly ovate in this one (but you can't see this in the photo).

Here is U. uniflora for comparison:

Posted Image

Hello
Thank you for the explanation.
Regards Alexander
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#12 Miloslav Macháček

 
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Posted 01 January 2012 - 01:35 AM

Hi, Miguel - really great photo! This is very nice species - congratulations on flowers!

P.S.: And aah yes - it's fine to see another pentax-guy around :sun_bespectacled:

Edited by Miloslav Macháček, 01 January 2012 - 01:41 AM.


#13 MFS

 
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Posted 01 January 2012 - 21:43 PM

How tall are the flower stalks? I still don't actually know... :sarcastic_hand:


Mine are about 10 cm.