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Australian plants on my vacation


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#1 sciabokho

 
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Posted 20 December 2011 - 11:19 AM

I 'm traveling trough Australia at the moment. Have seen a lot so far. Here a link to my blog for the pics. Maybe you can use google translate if you want to read the dutch text.

http://sciabokho.wor...ustralie/#entry

#2 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 20 December 2011 - 11:53 AM

Very nice finds! Glad to see that you found Cephalotus on your own. BTW the Utricularia you described as dichotoma (if I got it right) is U. paulineae. Congrats!

Regards

Martin

#3 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 20 December 2011 - 12:23 PM

Most impressive for me are the populations of U. paulineae and D. hamiltonii, you don't see images of those often enough- particularly in such profusion.

#4 sciabokho

 
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Posted 21 December 2011 - 06:45 AM

Hello Martin,

Yes I did(with some help). I wanted to tell you in person, but I forgot.

For the Utricularia. Didn't know, but how do I reconize? I read about the flowerstalks. I got pictures with just one flower, two an three. Maybe I saw both?

#5 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 22 December 2011 - 20:57 PM

Hello Felix,

here what Lowrie says in his species description about separating paulineae from dichotoma:

Posted Image

In easy words I would describe the flower (better: the lower lip) in top view as about 2/3 of a circle.
The lower lip in U. dichotoma is more like a 1/3 circle (giving it its typical apron style look).

Not totally precise, but good for a first differentiation.

Regards

Martin

#6 Daniel O.

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 00:29 AM

Really nice fieldtrip pictures.
Thanks for sharing.

Best regards,

Dani

#7 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 06:09 AM

The lower lip in U. dichotoma is more like a 1/3 circle (giving it its typical apron style look).


I don't think that this should ever be used as an overall defining characteristic of U. dichotoma as many forms product much wider lower corollas than this. Many of what we could call "typical forms" generally have corollas that are roughly 1/3 of a circle in size, but there are plenty of populations where this is the exception rather than the rule (eg- the Jamieson and Gembrook forms here in Victoria).

If only the WA forms are considered then this rule probably applies much more appropriately as from what I have seen, the WA forms generally have narrower corollas than some of the eastern state forms.

#8 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 07:58 AM

If only the WA forms are considered then this rule probably applies much more appropriately as from what I have seen, the WA forms generally have narrower corollas than some of the eastern state forms.


Good addition Sean. And as paulineae is restricted to the SW, I think for an easy first look, the corolla form (in top view!) is a good way to separate both in the field.
Something that I have observed in all my dichotoma and paulineae forms I grew, is the fact that the edges of the lower corolla in dichotoma is pointed downwards, whereas in paulineae always even to slightly upwards. That strenghtens the visual effect of a smaller circle segment in dichotoma, and a very big circle element in paulineae (3/4 would perhaps match better than 2/3).

When you flatten the corolla of dichotoma, I remember they are often surprisingly wider than what they first look like in top view. Maybe that is true especially for the Eastern forms - I cannot remember exactly. Can you confirm this and the downward bending for the Eastern forms?

But anyway - not satisfying for a taxonomically correct differentiation. Just for those lazy people who do not always carry their Taylor and the Lowrie papers with them :wink:

#9 Martin Hingst

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 08:31 AM

Hmm, I am an awful drawer - but even then perhaps better than too many words ...

Lower lip in caricature: (dichotoma on the left, paulineae on the right)

Posted Image

Not for the botanists, but maybe helpful for non-Utricularia-nerds :wink:

Edited by Martin Hingst, 23 December 2011 - 08:34 AM.


#10 Sockhom

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 11:22 AM

Not for the botanists, but maybe helpful for non-Utricularia-nerds :wink:


It's very clear, Martin. Thank you!

François.
(Got to say those Utrics aren't that boring after all ;-))

#11 Christian

 
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Posted 24 December 2011 - 15:47 PM

Hello,

thanks for the pictures! Congrats for finding Drosera hamiltonii and Utricularia paulinaea (both of which i would have loved to find myself ;) ).

Christian

#12 Carlos Rohrbacher

 
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Posted 26 December 2011 - 02:19 AM

Drosera hamiltonii, Cephalotus follicularis and nice utricularia ...
... I loved! :sun_bespectacled: