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Colouration of ceph"


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#1 awp

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 18:47 PM

Since I got this ceph, I have never seen it produces any non carnivorous leaf.
Would like to ask is there a correlation between the production of non carnivorous leaf and colouration of the plant?

For me it seems like the more colouration the plant has, the less likely it is to produce non carnivorous leaf??

Pic from Sep 2011
Under white light:
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#2 awp

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 18:51 PM

And Today:
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#3 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 19:07 PM

it depends on the clone, some produce loads (e.g. Hummer's Giant'), some hardly ever (e.g. Julie Jones large clone), also some years are better than others...2011 was very good!


great colour btw



#4 awp

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 19:19 PM

it depends on the clone, some produce loads (e.g. Hummer's Giant'), some hardly ever (e.g. Julie Jones large clone), also some years are better than others...2011 was very good!


great colour btw


Thx for the reply!

It was named dark-red when I brought it.
but no clone name was given
Have to wait to find out.....

#5 ada

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 19:23 PM

Its a nice idea,no or few non carnivorous leaves gives you a really coloured plant.
I have one seedling that survived the cold of the last two winters out in the greenhouse,it has only produce 1 non carnivorous leaf so far and is really green.

ada

#6 Cephman

 
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Posted 09 December 2011 - 22:28 PM

My take on the subject of dark color pitchers is one of high light intensity.
The more light, the darker the plant pitcher and the less need for the plant to produce regular leaves to absorb sunlight.

#7 Marcus B

 
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Posted 10 December 2011 - 04:10 AM

From my experience it seems to vary with the lighting, the temperature, the clone and the pot size. At this stage I am assuming that the pot size has an effect on how cold the roots get, as basket pots appear to result in darker plants, even if the pots are larger.

Plants produce more non-carnivorous leaves if in low light than bright light. I have kept plants in the shade for this reason, while the same clone in the light produced very few NCL that are hard to get to for use as leaf cuttings.

Of my plants in good light, almost all my small pots have dark coloured plants in them, while the large pots have lighter (red and green rather than purple) coloured plants, except the baskets, which have dark plants.

#8 mobile

 
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Posted 10 December 2011 - 12:42 PM

While there are probably other factors, my Cephalotus produce more leaves in winter, which correlates to lower light levels and duration. I can get them to produce leaves in summer too, by removing them from natural light and putting them under low light level fluorescent tubes. As Stephen said, this summer was very good for leaves and my large Cephalotus produced far more leaves than pitchers.

#9 numpty

 
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Posted 11 December 2011 - 10:49 AM

I've noticed that my Ceph only turns red in winter, whereas it's completely green the rest of the year. Non-carnivorous leaves have appeared when I've had it in low-light conditions in both winter and summer, so there isn't a straightforward correlation between red colouration and non-carnivorous leaf production in my growing conditions.

Beautiful plant, by the way!