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#1 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 06:50 AM

Dear Forum,

How do I reach the web master or author of "A World of Pinguicula" website? It could use an update or two...

Does P. moranensis form a winter resting bud like P. laueana or P. gypsicola? The texts I read say they do. My plants say they don't. Same for P. rectifolia; which I'm thinking is simply a subspecies of P. moranensis...

Does the species P. stolonifera actually exist? It just looks like another P. moranensis to me... What actually makes it different from P. m.? Besides for the unconvincing "stolons"...

#2 Marcus Vieweg

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 08:08 AM

Hi Dave,

Does P. moranensis form a winter resting bud like P. laueana or P. gypsicola? The texts I read say they do. My plants say they don't. Same for P. rectifolia; which I'm thinking is simply a subspecies of P. moranensis...


Indeed P. moranensis forms a winter resting bud. But it is depending on the plant (ssp., form, or location a plant comes from) you cultivate. Some forms are getting almost onion like, others are only get smaller, thick leaves. P. rectifolia does that too. Maybe I'm able to take some pictures to show you in the afternoon.

I don't know why your plants don't form winter rosettes. Maybe you keep them to wet end to warm? How long is the period of light they get a day?

Does the species P. stolonifera actually exist? It just looks like another P. moranensis to me... What actually makes it different from P. m.? Besides for the unconvincing "stolons"...


P. stolonifera is a synonym for P. orchiodioides used in former times cause there were some mistakes in identification. This plant looks totally different to P. moranensis. It forms onion like winter buds and has real stolons like P. vallisnerifolia and P. chuquisacensis
Don't get mixed up with P. moranensis f. orchidioides which is indeed only a special form of the moranensis-Komplex.

Hope this helps!

Regards

Marcus

Edited by Marcus Vieweg, 29 November 2011 - 08:09 AM.


#3 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 16:44 PM

Dear Markus,

I've been growing these butterworts for years. I have all my plants growing together in a single tray.

The agnata(s), gypsicola, esseriana, colimensis and laueana don't seem to have any trouble with forming resting buds... Do you feel moranensis is more sensitive to moisture conditions?

The four different clones I have never show signs of forming a resting bud. They just make fewer, smaller leaves that are still carnivorous. Although, thinking back I can't recall whether sp. "Pachuca" did so when I still had the plant... I don't think so...

#4 Marcel van den Broek

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 17:13 PM

Dear Forum,

How do I reach the web master or author of "A World of Pinguicula" website? It could use an update or two...


have you tried PM? Eric is epbb on this forum.

#5 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 19:00 PM

have you tried PM? Eric is epbb on this forum.

Thanks Marcel, but I'm a little confused. That tag, "epbb" points to Markus... So did Markus take over for Eric?

#6 Ruben Resendiz

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 19:06 PM

Sorry if I write wrong, but in the wild I see so much variation of P.moranensis var. neovolcanica, in shape, in form, flower diferent in color and shape, I see so muchs ping in Hidaldo, Estado de Mexico, Queretaro, Morelos, San Luis Potosi, so yes I see forms of P.moranensis in resting bud, but also I cultivate so long time ago, forms of P.moranensis that grow all year if I put plants in water an humid conditions.

Thanks

#7 Marcel van den Broek

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 20:09 PM

Thanks Marcel, but I'm a little confused. That tag, "epbb" points to Markus... So did Markus take over for Eric?

Hi Dave, As far as I know and can see it's still Eric. Markus is only listed as a friend of Eric in his profile :smile:

#8 Marcus Vieweg

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 20:41 PM

Hi Dave,

as I said here's a little photo of today:

Posted Image

In my cool and dry condition all forms of P. moranensis I grow form a winter rosette more or less like this one of P. moranensis f. orchidioides.

As Ruben said P. moranensis is very variable and there might be clones that don't need to go "dormant", but I never cultivated one that didn't go dormant at all.

Kind Regards

Marcus

Edited by Marcus Vieweg, 29 November 2011 - 20:42 PM.


#9 31drew31

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 21:07 PM

My P. moranensis 'alba' has switched leaves and has been making succulent leaves for the past 5 weeks or so. I have 3 or 4 other types or moranensis which have continued carnivorous growth under identical conditions.

#10 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 30 November 2011 - 06:12 AM

Hi Dave, As far as I know and can see it's still Eric. Markus is only listed as a friend of Eric in his profile :smile:

Duh! I'm still not used to the newer layout of this website... What, it is like two years old already, right? LOL

I've send Eric a message... Thanks.

#11 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 30 November 2011 - 06:17 AM

In my cool and dry condition all forms of P. moranensis I grow form a winter rosette more or less like this one of P. moranensis f. orchidioides.

As Ruben said P. moranensis is very variable and there might be clones that don't need to go "dormant", but I never cultivated one that didn't go dormant at all.

Thanks Markus,

I think it might be related to the soil moist levels... Could you explain the different between form moranensis and form orchidioides?

#12 Marcus Vieweg

 
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Posted 30 November 2011 - 08:12 AM

Hi Dave,

don't get me wrong. P. moranensis f. orchidioides is no cultivar and not officialy described as a form. The name is used by growers to show that it is the plant which was sold as P. orchidioides in former times. That was totally wrong! So in fact it is a form of P. moranensis like others too!

Because of it's interesting flower form it's quite easy to determinate. For example the corolla lobes are elongate, look here:

Posted Image

Regards Marcus

#13 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 30 November 2011 - 18:12 PM

Hi Dave, don't get me wrong. P. moranensis f. orchidioides is no cultivar and not officialy described as a form. The name is used by growers to show that it is the plant which was sold as P. orchidioides in former times. That was totally wrong! So in fact it is a form of P. moranensis like others too!

Because of it's interesting flower form it's quite easy to determinate. For example the corolla lobes are elongate, look here:

Hello Markus,

I have that plant! and its currently in flower right now for the first time in a while. It is labeled, "P. not oblongiloba from Harold Weiner"... I was thinking, I'm not sure what oblongiloba is, but this sure looks like a moranensis.