Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Effective removal of slug eggs


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 hmbluck

 
hmbluck
  • Full Members
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cambridgeshire
  • Interests:BOTANY: mainly North American carnivorous plants.
    COLLECTING: high-end hi-fi; pottery and porcelain; fine pens; haute horologie; fossils; thematic philately.
    TRAVEL: Europe and USA.
    MISC.: rare whiskies; high-performance cars; resistance training.
 

Posted 24 November 2011 - 14:26 PM

Hi All,

As winter approaches my thoughts have turned to preparing my plants for their hibernation period. Cutting away dead/dying growth and checking the soils for pests, I have noticed a larger than usual quantity of slug eggs; particularly in the more open growing medium I use for the Darlingtonia. Does anybody know of a good way of preventing future occurrances? (During the winter period a number of plants will need to be divided and repotted so can remove the eggs by hand; but ideally I don't want to disturb the plants every winter unless absolutely necessary). I've read that copper strips can deter slugs; various insecticides and, of course; beer traps... which (if any) works the best or are there other methods that either kills the adult slugs or prevents their eggs from hatching?

Best regards,

Howard

#2 Little-Bacchus

 
Little-Bacchus
  • Full Members
  • 94 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Botany, Art, Music, Science, Entomology
 

Posted 26 November 2011 - 15:23 PM

If you want to go down the eco friendly root then your best bet is to encourage over wintering birds to eat the eggs by trimming back and letting them get to the eggs. Slugs will also eat other slug egg so if you have been heavy handed in killling them of it could be why there are many more eggs this year.

Copper works very well with min impact on anything else I would avoid chemical control as poor slugs being at the bottom of the feed pile they food for so many good animals in a garden. As it is a bog garden you could do well by trying to get some toads in.

A safe way to give slugs a good kicking is to use nematodes control this will keep the number way down and if backed up with copper strip you should be almost slug free in a year.

#3 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,268 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 26 November 2011 - 17:38 PM

I agree that nematodes might be worth a go in the spring, when the soil temperature is 5ÂșC or above. Nemaslug is one brand

#4 hmbluck

 
hmbluck
  • Full Members
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cambridgeshire
  • Interests:BOTANY: mainly North American carnivorous plants.
    COLLECTING: high-end hi-fi; pottery and porcelain; fine pens; haute horologie; fossils; thematic philately.
    TRAVEL: Europe and USA.
    MISC.: rare whiskies; high-performance cars; resistance training.
 

Posted 28 November 2011 - 17:39 PM

Thanks for the nematode advice... I'll definitely look into this further. In the meantime I'll add a strip of copper around the bog's perimeter.

Best regards,

Howard