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Water and light question


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#1 Oleksii

 
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Posted 05 November 2011 - 23:23 PM

Hi to all!

First question is about light. I read a lot of good about using CFL for plants and what do you think - system of 24+40W CFLs will be enough for Heliamphora minor and epiphytic Utricularias ( predicted distance between end of lamp and pot surface is near 10 cm)?

And second - I use distilled water for my plants, but it's pH sometimes is not low. Have I change it by adding acids(for example acetic or succinic)? And if yes, will all CP like this water?

Thank you for answers!

Oleksii.

Edited by Oleksii, 05 November 2011 - 23:56 PM.


#2 tulio.

 
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Posted 06 November 2011 - 06:32 AM

1- yes,they 'll be good but you now cfl become very hot when they work,so you have to play attention to the temperature ( the hely are highland )

1- for analyzing water you have to see the conductyvity ( not ph ). what ph do you have ?

ps here there're some cfl http://www.greentown...dex&cPath=2_115

#3 Oleksii

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 08:23 AM

Thanks for answer.

About water - it conductivity usually is between 0,02-0,08 µS/cm (mostly 0,02-0,04), but pH is near 6 now.

What about lighting - in near future I'll change 40W lamp on a bit higher W lamp.

Oleksii



#4 johns

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 10:25 AM

The tap water here has high pH (7.5-7.8) but fairly low TDS (50-60ppm if I recall correctly). My butterworts, sundews and pitcher plants don't seem to mind. As long as the conductivity/TDS is low I wouldn't worry about it.

#5 Zlatokrt

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 10:51 AM

pH of a Distilled water should not be low - it should be more or less neutral (pH 7 should have absolutelly pure H2O). It will become acid or alkaline in contact with some source of H+ or OH- ions. The most important is, that its conductivity is low - it indicates, that it contains only a little salts and other things.

Edited by Zlatokrt, 07 November 2011 - 12:45 PM.


#6 mobile

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 12:42 PM

Only recently produced deionised (demineratised) water will be pH 7. After a short while it should be slightly acidic at ~pH 5.8, due to dissolved carbon dioxide CO2 from the air.



#7 Zlatokrt

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 12:46 PM

Ah... you are right. I forget this.

#8 Oleksii

 
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Posted 07 November 2011 - 13:30 PM

The tap water here has high pH (7.5-7.8) but fairly low TDS (50-60ppm if I recall correctly). My butterworts, sundews and pitcher plants don't seem to mind. As long as the conductivity/TDS is low I wouldn't worry about it.


You are lucky man :). Our tap water is really hard...




So, general conclusion is not to add any acids? :)



#9 Oleksii

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:45 AM

Hi again!

One more stupid question :)

What sand size is most universal to use for different CP?




Oleksii



Edited by Oleksii, 21 November 2011 - 09:45 AM.


#10 mobile

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:50 AM

I think it's probably sharp sand. Though, many don't use sand and use perlite instead. A word of caution about sand - I have been having a few issues with plants in peat:sand mix recently and performed a little test on the 'lime-free' horticultural grade sand I have been using. I poured some diluted lactic acid on it and it fizzed like crazy, for a long time, with large pieces or grit fizzing to the surface. This must mean that the sand I have contains alkaline materials!

#11 Oleksii

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 11:07 AM

Thank you for answer!


This question arised because I want (and have) to buy big amount of sand.

Sharp - it means that grains is few mm in diameter? I sometimes used perlite, and it had quite big grains. Maybe, fraction 1,4-2mm will be good...

What about chemicals - they promised SiO² 99,571 %, but I also will use HCl treatment and washing by distilled water before using.

Edited by Oleksii, 21 November 2011 - 12:10 PM.