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overwintering tiny sundew seedlings


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#1 alanbower

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 19:11 PM

I have a selection of sundew seedlings (Capensis, rotundiflora, and a few others that I cant remember) they are exceedingly small.....also some Leucophylla seedlings.
Should I leave them outdoors as they have been all summer or bring them in?
If left outside, should I protect them or let nature take it's course!?

Edited by alanbower, 22 October 2011 - 19:12 PM.


#2 jimscott

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 21:54 PM

I would bring them and keep the sarracenia & rotundifolia in the coolest temp room you have. D. capensis isn't a temperate plant like the other two.

#3 alanbower

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 22:26 PM

I would bring them and keep the sarracenia & rotundifolia in the coolest temp room you have. D. capensis isn't a temperate plant like the other two.

apparently they are all UK hardy though...bring them in this winter and acclimatise next year??

#4 jimscott

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 00:04 AM

That's what I would do.

#5 Petiolarissean

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 04:42 AM

You can also just bring in the plants.Keep them warm and they will continue to grow.Plants that require dormancy dont need dormancy until they reach adulthood.Once adult if their forced,They will rot.

#6 Megs

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 08:19 AM

Leave rotundifolia seedlings outside. I do this in Denmark with down to - 23C.

Martin

#7 VFTLance <3

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 16:19 PM

i have what i think to be some incredibly tiny D.Aliciae seedlings which i just noticed today, theyre currently in my conservatory with all my other plants such as the parent plant and others, should i bring them into the house during winter as it gets quite cold in there or will they be ok?

Sarah

#8 jimscott

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 20:15 PM

i have what i think to be some incredibly tiny D.Aliciae seedlings which i just noticed today, theyre currently in my conservatory with all my other plants such as the parent plant and others, should i bring them into the house during winter as it gets quite cold in there or will they be ok?

Sarah



They should be brought in. D. aliciae is not a temperate plant. I would also, if possible, bring them in when outside and inside temps are as close to one another as possible, to minimize shock.

#9 VFTLance <3

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 20:17 PM

ah oki thanks, should i bring the parent plant in too then?

#10 jimscott

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 20:21 PM

Leave rotundifolia seedlings outside. I do this in Denmark with down to - 23C.

Martin


To the author of this topic: The advice appears contradictory. D. rotundifolia & Sarracenias are temperate plants and in nature, nobody is bringing them inside. In nature, some won't survive the winter, but most will.... and there's tons of survivors, relative to the few that won't. With our hobbied plants, there is less room for failure. Hence the consevrative, seemingly coddling approach. Basically, it's a small gamble and Megs is a very experienced hobbiest, with sound advice. So it's your choice.

#11 Megs

 
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Posted 24 October 2011 - 14:21 PM

My bet is that bringing in a species like rotundifolia at this time of the year could be more lethal than not.
I wouldnt leave south african species outside. (with a few exceptions)

Martin

#12 Petiolarissean

 
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Posted 27 October 2011 - 09:35 AM

Most if not all south african drosera do well in very cold temps.

#13 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 16 November 2011 - 17:38 PM

But not freezing. Some think these plants are not temperate because they aren't hardy. All South African Drosera are temperate, but are not hardy i.e. they should not be subjected to freezing temperatures.

Most are highlanders and they don't like it all that warm either.