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A.konjak


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#1 Dicon

 
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Posted 20 October 2011 - 20:39 PM

Hi All,
I was given a large Amorphophallus konjak earlier this year, it has sat (potted) happily in a shady spot through the summer, but now the frosts are arriving, what should I do now for the best?
Should I protect it from frost
I know it dies back to a tuber, but is it frost that knocks it back or what?

Any help appreciated

Matt

#2 maxxima

 
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Posted 21 October 2011 - 10:10 AM

You can dig them out like tulips and store ziplocked in a dark/cool area or leave them in the pot throughout winter (dry) depending on your temperatures...My climate is close to mediterrenean climate so I tend to leave them in the large pot outside. It's easier and they always come back when the summer heat hits.
I dig a few of them up to monitor things. If you do that, make sure iyou do after the stem has died down on the surface and wait a bit for the roots to transfer back to the corm. When you take the corm, it shouldn't have a network of roots, it should be mostly by itself.

By the way, do watch out for fungus gnat larvae, they really love the corms...I always do a DDVP wash before digging them out and when I first plant them in spring. If you dig them out, make sure they are clean of larvae or they will eat the corm to oblivion in the bag.

#3 maxxima

 
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Posted 21 October 2011 - 12:49 PM

By the way, this is part of the care sheet that was sent to me by the original owner:

In the fall with the risk of frost (eg if you are growing in zone 5) the pots are knocked over so they will not get any rain and the pot will dry. Alternatively, it could be placed in a greenhouse or a patio and allowed to dry. The leaf will die back. Do not cut it off until it completely yellows and collapses as it may be translocating sugars into the corm until it is withered. Once it is dry, it can be stored in the dry growing medium until spring and then dug up so that small corms can be seperated from the mother corm. Winter storage can also be in dry peat or in the open air. Storage temperatures should be somewhere between 42 and 50f. If stored too warm, the corm may grow at a time when you are not prepared to grow it. Corms can be started in pots indoors in cold climates and then transferred outside when night temperatures do not drop below 55f. Remember, the warmer the temperature the faster the growth and the longer the season for the leaf. This species is cold hardy and can survive in ground as far north as Raleigh, North Carolina if soil is well drained.
Propagation is generally by offset. When the corm is dug unpotted in its dormant state, you may find small corms attached by stolon-like structures to the main corm. These can be seperated and potted individually.


#4 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 21 October 2011 - 18:25 PM

mine died back a few weeks ago. I keep them in the pot, bone dry, frost free (5C) and divide in spring. I feel they have less chance of rotting if you do not disturb them over winter, if you unpot you risk fungus getting to the corm, they are protected by a layer of compost if you leave them be. I would not let the frost get the foliage if you can help it, that might prevent natural translocation of nutrients....

#5 Dicon

 
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Posted 21 October 2011 - 19:22 PM

Thanks for replies, all the info I needed!
I'll keep it frost free and dry it out to wilt it.
I'll need to divide it before spring as there are a few plants in the pot, but will wait until next year before disturbing things.

Cheers

Matt

#6 manders

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 09:04 AM

I heard of one person growing them in the garden in lanacashire but not tried it myself yet, last year mine were left exposed to -10C uncovered in the greenhouse, most went mushy but one or two few survived and grew ok this year, so they are surprisngly tough for a sub-tropical.