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peat free mix?


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#1 will9

 
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Posted 17 September 2011 - 10:35 AM

Hi all, i have experiment a bit whit a base sand mix,i have used 60% breakers sand,30% perlith and 10 % spagnumpeat.
I start a few months ago whit grow D ascendens,D capensis,D binata,D alicea ,D venusta and a few Drosera i not know,and some VFT cultivars.
All this plants looks better then in my usual mix after 2 or 3 months ,she have a better color ,are bigger and droseras have allways more drops,she looks match more healty ,but this can meaby only for the first months ,have some one try this allready ?
I have seen on pine needles and seasand but not find anything abouth a mix like this.

I use this mix allready for my pinguicula for a year now and this looks match better like before,plants looks match more healty.
It s meaby a way for use match lesser peat like Stephen Morley ,but here in Belgium we have not that kind of ground like you in UK,or peat from a water clean installation ,i think every one can got sand ,perlite and peat.
I like to hear some experiences from other growers please
Cheers Will

#2 danthecpman

 
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Posted 20 September 2011 - 07:54 AM

Hi Will,

I am currently using 50% silver sand to 50% perlite for all of my drosera filiformis and most of my drosera linearis. I have found that the filiformis grow alot faster in this mix, i am still experimenting with sarras and darlingtonia so will see what happens over winter.

Regards
Dan

#3 will9

 
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Posted 20 September 2011 - 17:35 PM

Hi Will,

I am currently using 50% silver sand to 50% perlite for all of my drosera filiformis and most of my drosera linearis. I have found that the filiformis grow alot faster in this mix, i am still experimenting with sarras and darlingtonia so will see what happens over winter.

Regards
Dan


Thanks Dan,it s experiences like that that i want to know,i let know next year how my plants grow in it ,so far very good.
It s better when plants can grow on a peat free or match lesser peat mix, when i see pics from localitys i see many times plants are growing on allmost pure sand,so why not try,
Cheers Will

#4 Davion

 
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Posted 22 September 2011 - 05:05 AM

http://a1.sphotos.ak...8_7413901_n.jpg

"I"ve-Been Experimenting-With NEWSPAPER-Cellulose Cat-Litter For-R Few-Months Now

http://a6.sphotos.ak...1_2336379_n.jpg

But-Am Having Terrible-Trouble Trying-to Kick-It INTO-Shape so-to-Speak!!! >(*~*)<

http://a2.sphotos.ak...3_5027541_n.jpg

'Apparently' There's Something, as-Yet UNDEFINED, IN-Peat That's Also IN-Coir That's 'More'-IN-Peat &-Less IN-Coir That's Negliable or 'N[email=""]ot'-@-All[/email] IN NEWSPAPER-Cellulose THART The-Plants Appear-to Require so-to-Speak!!!??? >(*~*)<

http://a7.sphotos.ak...6_3146612_n.jpg

The-Plants Arn't-'Showing' The Usual-Signs of Extensive Nitrogen-DRAWDOWN That-"I"m 'Use'-to From Pinus-radiata SAWDUST Experimentation from 15-Years R-Go ... though "I"-Have Noticed THART Cyanophyta (Cyanobacteria) don't-Seem-to Want to-Grow-IN The Medium Like-They Do IN-Peat &-Coir so-to-Speak.

http://a1.sphotos.ak...9_4577366_n.jpg

Anyway ... "I"ll 'Try'-to-Keep-Going with The-Research as-Long-as "I"-Can so-to-Speak ... But-'Unless' "I"-Can Discover The-'Missing'-Factor The-Experimentation Will IN-Itself become Self-Limiting so-to-Speak!!!??? >(*~*)<

#5 5hort5

 
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Posted 29 March 2012 - 22:37 PM

The old what to use instead of peat problem. What I would like to try, but I don't have enough plants to try nor the money to buy a plant to try with but, I'd like to try a mix of on tree, or recently fallen pine needles and sand. Reading a few sources they seem to have a low ph, for example here http://wood.uwex.edu...-needles-cause/ I think they'd need changing every couple of years but the drainage should be pretty good, maybe too good. Has anyone tried this or is it a daft idea?

#6 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 29 March 2012 - 22:46 PM

look here;

http://www.cpukforum...=1

#7 5hort5

 
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Posted 29 March 2012 - 23:22 PM

V good thread that one, thanks for the link

#8 mantrid

 
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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:03 AM

The old what to use instead of peat problem. What I would like to try, but I don't have enough plants to try nor the money to buy a plant to try with but, I'd like to try a mix of on tree, or recently fallen pine needles and sand. Reading a few sources they seem to have a low ph, for example here http://wood.uwex.edu...-needles-cause/ I think they'd need changing every couple of years but the drainage should be pretty good, maybe too good. Has anyone tried this or is it a daft idea?


It is worth a try. I have an experiment with 100% pine needles going at the moment and after a year the pine needles at the bottom of the pot that were sat in the water have decomposed and turned to mush. This might be having a negative effect on the growth of the plant (release of nutrients, reduced aeration around he root tips). Sand at least in the bottom few cms may help stop the needles compacting and rotting so fast.