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Can anyone help ID this plant with feather like flowers?


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#1 mobile

 
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Posted 07 August 2011 - 20:23 PM

My kids have a Jasmine plant in their playroom and a new shoot has appeared. At first I thought it was just a new Jasmine shoot but it has radically different flowers. Can anyone ID this?

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#2 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 07 August 2011 - 20:27 PM

Carl; this is a weed - Epilobium sp.. The feather like flowers are actually seedpods that have split and the feathers help seeds blow away in the wind. The flowers are the little pink boyos.
The Elephant hawk-moth (Deilephila elpenor) feeds on these.

#3 mobile

 
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Posted 07 August 2011 - 20:43 PM

Cheers James. Now my wife has read that it's a weed I'm sure that it'll be gone in the morning :lol:

#4 mantrid

 
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Posted 07 August 2011 - 21:57 PM

Cheers James. Now my wife has read that it's a weed I'm sure that it'll be gone in the morning :lol:


Im suprised you havent experienced this stuff before. I have a garden full of it and am sick of pulling it up every year. At least it comes up easily unlike dandilion and dock.

#5 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:02 AM

most likely Epilobium montanum, prob the most common Epilobium in gardens