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Hardy terrestrial utricularia?


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#1 bogman

 
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Posted 30 July 2011 - 13:21 PM

Anybody knows of such a plant? I have heard that subulata, cornuta, and even dichotoma can stay outside, and to grow well with a little help during winter... (good amount of mulch). Any experiences? Some seller told me that u. subulata is almost like weed in his collections, and that it sprouts all around via seed, stays in an unheated greenhouse during winter with temperate droseras and pings, and regrows every year without any problems... It would be great if it is true, because I prefer temperate plants, and dont have any terrestrial utrics yet...

#2 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 30 July 2011 - 13:59 PM

Utricularia monanthos and some of the higher altitude forms of U. dichotoma will cope with temps below 0 deg C.

#3 jimscott

 
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Posted 30 July 2011 - 22:24 PM

U. livida, bisquamata, sandersonii....

#4 manders

 
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Posted 30 July 2011 - 23:00 PM

U. livida, bisquamata, sandersonii....


None of these survived a uk winter, inside my greenhouse.

#5 Ian Salter

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 02:19 AM

Oddly just had a conversation about how I've had U. Dichotoma outside throughout winter sopping wet in a dinky pot that had done better than its greenhouse siblings.
Relatively hardy one might assume.

#6 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 05:00 AM

Oddly just had a conversation about how I've had U. Dichotoma outside throughout winter sopping wet in a dinky pot that had done better than its greenhouse siblings.
Relatively hardy one might assume.


It is probably dependant upon which form it is too. The Tasmanian and alpine forms are likely to be much hardier than those from much further north in Australia.

#7 Tim Caldwell

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 06:04 AM

It is probably dependant upon which form it is too. The Tasmanian and alpine forms are likely to be much hardier than those from much further north in Australia.


Victorian forms of U. dichotoma have to be able to handle the occasional frost, but they wouldn't like European winter temps. I think Bogman was right that the most northerly species from America like U. cornuta would be worth a try, and other than that it's alpine forms/species like U. monanthos.

Edited by Tim Caldwell, 31 July 2011 - 06:06 AM.


#8 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 07:40 AM

Some seller told me that u. subulata is almost like weed in his collections,


it is a weed, best to avoid if you can or it will contaminate everything...

#9 bogman

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 07:40 AM

And what about subulata? Is it really annual??? :( I am gonna try with subulata, if I dont find cornuta first, but I guess cornuta is the best choice...

#10 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 08:23 AM

Keep away from subulata, or you will never have a pure pot of utrics due to the contaminative nature of it. I've been able to keep it out of my collection so far...

#11 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 31 July 2011 - 11:44 AM

Victorian forms of U. dichotoma have to be able to handle the occasional frost, but they wouldn't like European winter temps.


This may be true for the more common coastal and lower altitude forms.

There is at least one Victorian form of U. dichotoma that grows at Falls Creek at higher elevations than U. monanthos. This form would easily withstand a UK winter. I can think of another that withstands constant frosts and occasional snow throughout winter which I'm sure would do well in Europe.

#12 bogman

 
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Posted 01 August 2011 - 08:08 AM

Keep away from subulata, or you will never have a pure pot of utrics due to the contaminative nature of it. I've been able to keep it out of my collection so far...


I don't mind if it spreads all around... I want to grow them in bog garden, not in pots! :)

#13 mattynatureboy44

 
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Posted 01 August 2011 - 17:42 PM

it is a weed, best to avoid if you can or it will contaminate everything...


Is it really worth avoiding completely and not having in your collection, I only just got a few more Utrics this being one of them, is it better to get rid of itn completely or can it be grown out the way without it contaminating other pots.

#14 Tim Caldwell

 
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Posted 02 August 2011 - 08:41 AM

Is it really worth avoiding completely and not having in your collection, I only just got a few more Utrics this being one of them, is it better to get rid of itn completely or can it be grown out the way without it contaminating other pots.


I have to second (or 'tenth') what everyone else has said: if you have U. subulata in your collection it will spread. Someone who's primarily a Sarracenia enthusiast won't be bothered by it too much, but having this terrible weed amongst your other beloved Utrics will be a huge problem that you will never be able to fix, and every Utric species that you have will end up trying to compete with the U. subulata that's taking over its pot.

Can you have a pot of U. subulata and just avoid contaminating your other pots? Well, you can try. But it constantly produces prodigious amounts of tiny seeds that can easily get stuck to your finger or a watering can. It eventually finds its way into almost every collection and I think it's just best to try to put that day off as long as possible.

It's not a very spectacular species at the best of times, and the most common forms don't even produce proper flowers. So you won't miss its absence, but if you keep it you'll probably regret the decision. Maybe some forms are less virulent than others, but as horrible as it is to say this about a new plant you've just bought, I would play it safe and get rid of it.

#15 bogman

 
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Posted 02 August 2011 - 21:28 PM

hmmm this really sounds strange! xD Carnivorous plant that is a weed and that everybody are avoiding in their collections! :D I dont know, but I think I will give it a try outside, because I guess it would be a perfect candidate for outside bog garden... Maybe I am wrong, I dont know... I dont see any other option... I cant find cornuta anywhere to buy, so this was my second option... I will think about it a bit further...

#16 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 02 August 2011 - 21:34 PM

Post in sales and want for cornuta. I'm sure many have it. Mine is too small atm to split. Why not try dichotoma as well? To be honest, both of those are much nicer than subulata.

But you probably won't even get proper flowers from U. subulata.

#17 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 02 August 2011 - 22:14 PM

The form of U. dichotoma from Falls Creek, Vic is also in collections in Europe. Try a Sales & Wants post for that.

#18 bogman

 
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Posted 03 August 2011 - 13:05 PM

What do you mean, I wont get proper flowers? I dont understand that... Do you mean it will not flower or what? Is dichotoma reliable to be outside all year? I ca only order from one seller from Hungary, because his shipments always arrive... I had problems ordering with our customs, but this seems to work so far! This seller has a few utrics in sale so I will post a link, so you can see what he offers and what would be the best choice...

here is the link;

http://www.carnivoro...ed23702068bbb38

Ok, I will try with dichotoma... I just hope it will survive the winter...

#19 Sean Spence

 
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Posted 03 August 2011 - 13:31 PM

No, not all forms of U. dichotoma will be hardy outside all year. If you don't know which form you are buying, don't buy.

U. monanthos is listed on the site you linked to. U. monanthos will be hardy outside all year.

#20 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 03 August 2011 - 13:37 PM

Subulata often produces cleistogamous flowers; they do not open but self pollinate and set seed without ever showing any sort of petal. If it were a pretty weed I think it would be a little more appreciated (but not much).