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Tillandsia in Florida


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#1 Sockhom

 
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Posted 09 July 2011 - 03:36 AM

Three different species in Myakka forest, west Florida:
http://carnivorousoc...akka-state.html

François.

#2 jimscott

 
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Posted 09 July 2011 - 13:16 PM

I love the expression on your face!

#3 rsivertsen

 
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Posted 09 July 2011 - 15:06 PM

Nice to see that you've found a Tillansia site. There are more species further south near Naples, mostly in Cypress groves, but that's quite a drive away from CP territory. You might even find the Florida cycad Zamia floridensis if you're lucky. You will see some non-native plants like the Polypodium aurea, or one of the Japanese climbing ferns (Lygodum japanicum mostly, but there are 2 or 3 species) which are some of the many non-native "escapees" that have become naturalized. There are loads of water hyacinth, water lettuce, Salvinia, and Azola, all of them exotics that have made their homes in Fla. There is also some mistletoe around, hard to find, most of them I have seen are in Mississippi and Alabama near the Gulf areas. Nice that you have found the native ribbon ferns there. I hope you get to see some of the native Pinguicula sites! They can be hard to find at first, many grow under dense grasses. I hope either Brian Barnes or Randy Zerr help you out with your search. - Rich

Edited by rsivertsen, 09 July 2011 - 15:38 PM.


#4 Sockhom

 
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Posted 11 July 2011 - 09:10 AM

Nice to see that you've found a Tillansia site. There are more species further south near Naples, mostly in Cypress groves, but that's quite a drive away from CP territory. You might even find the Florida cycad Zamia floridensis if you're lucky. You will see some non-native plants like the Polypodium aurea, or one of the Japanese climbing ferns (Lygodum japanicum mostly, but there are 2 or 3 species) which are some of the many non-native "escapees" that have become naturalized. There are loads of water hyacinth, water lettuce, Salvinia, and Azola, all of them exotics that have made their homes in Fla. There is also some mistletoe around, hard to find, most of them I have seen are in Mississippi and Alabama near the Gulf areas. Nice that you have found the native ribbon ferns there. I hope you get to see some of the native Pinguicula sites! They can be hard to find at first, many grow under dense grasses. I hope either Brian Barnes or Randy Zerr help you out with your search. - Rich


Dear Rich,

So far, i have observed four Tillandsia species. Too bad, I can't id them right now but, hopefully, I will sort this out. Thank you very much for the tips! I am enjoying very much Florida's flora and fauna and I hope I will stumble onto some of the botanicals gems you mentionned. I will spend a day looking for CP later in the week. Kids are eager to meet their first tattoos (armadillos) and snakes (although I do know how dangerous some of them can be in Florida)
Do you know where I can easily see some tattos?

All the best,

François

#5 rsivertsen

 
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Posted 11 July 2011 - 13:40 PM

Armadillos are very shy creatures, not easy to spot them; you might have more luck finding lots of anoles (several species too, at least one species originally from Cuba), and other reptiles, (there are some iguanas that have been released into the wild, and further south, the burmese python has become a nuisance exotic invader) even 'gators, maybe some amphibians, (there are some interesting frogs to be found in some places, tree frogs too) and certainly LOADS of insects! :P

Edited by rsivertsen, 11 July 2011 - 13:43 PM.


#6 Sockhom

 
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Posted 12 July 2011 - 15:37 PM

Dear Rich,

Thanks for all your tips. I appreciate. Well we have seen some gators and fantastic birds and lizards as well. I do hope we are luck enough to see armadillos and other mammals.
Some more Tillandsia stuff can be found here:
http://carnivorousoc...ia-kingdom.html

Rich, do you know a Tillandsia expert who might help to identify (or to confirm the identity) those species from Florida?

Cheers,

François.

#7 Gringo

 
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Posted 12 July 2011 - 18:45 PM

There are many Tillandsias in the Florida keys - I've foud some sites on Key Largo. I also saw lots of Tillandsias on my way from Miami to Cape Canaveral - those plants seem to be pretty common in Florida ;)

#8 rsivertsen

 
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Posted 13 July 2011 - 14:24 PM

Marie Selby Botanic Garden in Sarasota Fla., had a couple Tillandsia experts, but that is quite a drive for you from the panhandle. Maybe Brian Barnes or Randy Zerr might chime in on this. - Rich

#9 Sockhom

 
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Posted 14 July 2011 - 12:34 PM

Too bad, we've passed two times near Mary Selby BG these last days. I might have the time to pay them a visit before I leave, though.
How is the BG Rich? Is it a really nice one? Any chance for me to sight any hummingbirds?

Cheers,

François.

#10 rsivertsen

 
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Posted 14 July 2011 - 20:27 PM

I was there over 20 years ago, but it was a fantastic place even then! They may still have some Nepenthes, and Platyceriums. You should definately be able to observe some hummingbirds during this trip! They are all over my house right now! Anyone who has feeders set out for them will have them.. Enjoy! - Rich

#11 Sockhom

 
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Posted 27 July 2011 - 20:40 PM

This is "airplants"!
http://carnivorousoc...neoides-on.html


François.