Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Darlingtonia in full sun, 2011 update


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 petmantis

 
petmantis
  • Full Members
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:QC, Canada
 

Posted 22 June 2011 - 23:26 PM

I improved the "setup" that I used last year, seen here.

My plants are now growing in a large square net pot, that fits perfectly into one of the sides of the thermos cooler/water reservoir.

Posted Image

Picked up the net-pot for $3.99 ;)
Posted Image

Some of this year's pitchers...
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

And finally, a flower! Pointing towards the sun.
Posted Image

The cooler + aquarium pump seems to work well - the temperature of the media is at least around 18*C, but after a fresh change of the ice-packs it goes down to 14*C. So far, so good. . .
Now to see how they survive in midsummer heat waves of Montreal . . . Probably will have to bring them inside a couple weeks.

#2 dchasselblad74

 
dchasselblad74
  • Full Members
  • 1,300 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, IL USA
  • Interests:Guitars, Photography, Mountain Biking, Kendo, Rifle Shooting, Maori Bone Carving, Biology, Ecology, Aquariums, Orchids, Sarracenias, Nepenthes, Heliamphoras, Albany Pitchers, Sundews, Pings, Utrics.....
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 00:02 AM

That's Pretty Cool!!! Get it.....Pretty Cool :biggrin: But really, that is pretty clever...Even the sphagnum is very happy. Last year I tried growing my Darlingtonia in a pot submerged in my bog and I would place huge chunks of frozen RO water in those big Mcds cups on top of the roots and it seemed to work until it got so hot outside during summer and my plant just died. This year I have them outside in a deep tray of water, but when it goes more than 85 F I'm taking it inside....

#3 petmantis

 
petmantis
  • Full Members
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:QC, Canada
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 00:05 AM

Haha, thanks. :) You might want to be careful with immersing them in deep trays of water... Make sure to change it or topwater regularly, as they don't seem to appreciate stagnant water too much...

#4 TheInactiveMoth

 
TheInactiveMoth
  • Full Members
  • 930 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham, England
  • Interests:Arsenal & Notts County FC
    Ninjutsu
    Growing carnivorous plants
    Keeping tropical fish
    Playing guitar and piano
    Playing video games!
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 06:48 AM

I love the way the short pitchers sorta emerge from the moss!

#5 -Xeno-

 
-Xeno-
  • Full Members
  • 157 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Interests:CP's, Aquarium's, Invertebrates, Reptiles and Frogs Photography, Gaming.
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 07:27 AM

Great looking plant and set-up, it looks like it's thriving.

#6 Alexis

 
Alexis
  • Global Moderator
  • 3,274 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester / Whalley
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 08:40 AM

I'd really want to see a control where the plants are left sitting in water.

My darlingtonia sit in full sun, just sitting in water which becomes warm. I've even repotted on a hot day and seen the moss steam because it's so hot.

Which makes me very very sceptical for the need for cold roots, let alone apparatus.

On the other hand, I've heard there are distinct highland and lowland populations. I'd like to see a range of experiments with different clones.

#7 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 13:07 PM

A well-established plant can take 90 F+ temps, even in full sunlight. I don't do a thing special.

Posted Image

Edited by jimscott, 24 June 2011 - 14:04 PM.


#8 dchasselblad74

 
dchasselblad74
  • Full Members
  • 1,300 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, IL USA
  • Interests:Guitars, Photography, Mountain Biking, Kendo, Rifle Shooting, Maori Bone Carving, Biology, Ecology, Aquariums, Orchids, Sarracenias, Nepenthes, Heliamphoras, Albany Pitchers, Sundews, Pings, Utrics.....
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 14:19 PM

On the other hand, I've heard there are distinct highland and lowland populations. I'd like to see a range of experiments with different clones.



This is true....The "Highland" which is the Mountain Variety is actually the ones that can tolerate fluctuations of extreme heat and cold and also humidity and ph of the soil, while the "Lowland" which is the Coastal Variety is the ones that grow in a more constant temp, ph of soil, humidity...There is a you tube footage about these two varieties by Sarracenia Northwest titled "Serpents of Siskiyous" or something in that phrase which is a very interesting 9-10 minute documentary that kind of dispell some common misconceptions about the Cobra Plant.

#9 petmantis

 
petmantis
  • Full Members
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:QC, Canada
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 17:55 PM

I love the way the short pitchers sorta emerge from the moss!


Thanks! That's exactly what I was going for with the first setup (in the link to the old OCPS forum). Only the bulbous heads of the pitchers were visible through the moss, but a few weeks later when new pitchers developed, they were thin and etiolated... So unfortunately, the health of the plant was sacrificed for seemingly good looks.

Great looking plant and set-up, it looks like it's thriving.


Thanks! :)

I'd really want to see a control where the plants are left sitting in water.

My darlingtonia sit in full sun, just sitting in water which becomes warm. I've even repotted on a hot day and seen the moss steam because it's so hot.

Which makes me very very sceptical for the need for cold roots, let alone apparatus.

On the other hand, I've heard there are distinct highland and lowland populations. I'd like to see a range of experiments with different clones.


Given that I've only grown this species "successfully" for the past year, this is my second year with them actually being alive, I can't say that this is the optimal way of growing them. All the Montreal CP growers I know (including me) have their Darlingtonia from the Montreal Botanical Garden clone, which - when sold - look quite unhealthy. All of the plants are repotted from the thick, compacted moss they come in, into fresh and more airy mixtures - this probably leaves them to sulk for their first year growing in new homes.

With this in mind, none of the plants are even close to established their first year, and most growers keep them indoors under lights for a more controlled environment. A friend of mine grew his in a large planter with other Sarracenia very successfully for his first year, in partial sun, outside during heatwaves too - which was all great at the time, but come the following year the plant simply died.

Another case: my plants, their first year (last year): I think I managed to get one pitcher to grow from both plants. The single growth points they came with rotted away - but the plants didn't die. All the new, green pitchers from this year are from secondary growth points that emerged from around the old ones. They're a bit like very short stolons, that are gaining in size quickly from the mother plants...

All this leads me to think that it must be the clone's fault; as far as I know the Garden has been selling this one clone for years, and it may have weakened. I've visited the private production greenhouses to see the garden's collection of other CPs (mostly Neps and Pinguicula), and noticed large Darlingtonia all growing in a climate-controlled greenhouse, not in full sun and certainly not in low humidity.

Of course, I'd rather have my plants grow outdoors in full sun where they can attain at least some color, and if that means growing them in the water-recirculation setup, so be it...

A well-established plant can take 90 F+ temps, even in full sunlight. I don't do a thing special.


How does one get a well-established plant? How many years have you been growing that Cobra in the planter, with Sarrs? Looks very healthy indeed...

#10 TMCM

 
TMCM
  • Full Members
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portugal
 

Posted 23 June 2011 - 23:51 PM

Fantastic your system...
Congratulations!