Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Cephalotus vertical growing


  • Please log in to reply
44 replies to this topic

#21 Martin Hingst

 
Martin Hingst
  • Full Members
  • 1,363 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wiesbaden, Germany
  • Interests:music, cycling, travelling, minerals, utricularia :-)
 

Posted 17 January 2012 - 20:28 PM

Interesting experiment - and great looking result :-)

#22 amphirion

 
amphirion
  • Full Members
  • 214 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SF Bay Area, CA, USA
 

Posted 17 January 2012 - 22:24 PM

wonderful! quite a novel way to grow cephalotus. looks like your hard work and persistence have paid off!

#23 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 18 January 2012 - 09:48 AM

Agreed- maybe Marcus would give us a little tutorial on how to make one.


It was relatively simple. I just took an old piece of tree-fern trunk (TS not LS), the core of which had rotted out, and cut a hole through the remaining core. After that I plugged one end of the hole with sphagnum and transplanted a cutting into the resulting cup. The cutting is in peat and perlite, overlayed with sphagnum, like most of my plants.

After that I removed a few frond stem sections and filled the resulting holes with more sphagnum, then turned it on its side before dressing the top with more sphagnum. By keeping it damp the sphagum grew well and so has the Ceph. Much of its current growth has been put out in the last month and a half.

#24 Dode

 
Dode
  • Full Members
  • 178 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Perthshire, Scotland
 

Posted 18 January 2012 - 10:39 AM

It was relatively simple. I just took an old piece of tree-fern trunk (TS not LS), the core of which had rotted out, and cut a hole through the remaining core. After that I plugged one end of the hole with sphagnum and transplanted a cutting into the resulting cup. The cutting is in peat and perlite, overlayed with sphagnum, like most of my plants.

After that I removed a few frond stem sections and filled the resulting holes with more sphagnum, then turned it on its side before dressing the top with more sphagnum. By keeping it damp the sphagum grew well and so has the Ceph. Much of its current growth has been put out in the last month and a half.



Sorry, Ive got to ask...(TS not LS), what is that an abbreviation of?

#25 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 18 January 2012 - 22:25 PM

Sorry, Ive got to ask...(TS not LS), what is that an abbreviation of?


TS = Transverse, or Cross Section (CS), as opposed to Longitudinal section (LS). Sorry, it is just a bit of habitual terminology from dealing with sectioned specimens for such things as microscope slides, and timber slices.

I don't know if you can get a similar material, but most tree-fern pieces readily available here are LS pieces and lack the thickness to enable me to stand them up on their own. They are cut to avoid the core that I used to pot the Ceph into. I am considering trialing a LS if I can over come the issues.

Edited by Marcus B, 21 January 2012 - 09:31 AM.


#26 H.lividum

 
H.lividum
  • Full Members
  • 23 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy
 

Posted 19 January 2012 - 08:40 AM

I'm also trying a vertical growing from almost an year, but a little more "radical"...

Here's the result for now... ;)

Posted Image

#27 pmatil

 
pmatil
  • Full Members
  • 158 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Finland
 

Posted 01 February 2012 - 12:16 PM

I'm planning to buy tree fern (Cyathea contaminans). It's sold as background material for terrariums. Is your tree fern the same species? And, how fast will it start to grow? These are sold as panels: http://www.luckyreptile.com/products/145/en/pid1,0$pid2,7772743/products.html. Nice job on the cephalotus!

#28 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 01 February 2012 - 21:53 PM

I'm planning to buy tree fern (Cyathea contaminans). It's sold as background material for terrariums. Is your tree fern the same species? And, how fast will it start to grow? These are sold as panels: http://www.luckyreptile.com/products/145/en/pid1,0$pid2,7772743/products.html. Nice job on the cephalotus!


Different species, but most likely close enough. I mainly use the local ones that are the other genus (we have both genera locally). What I use is the dead parts cut off the bases of the trunk. They are cut back to the live tissue before planting in gardens. The species that you are referrign to is foreign to Austalia, but is apparently about the fastest growing. It might get a bit big for a tank if the tree-fern itself grows. It may just support the growth of other ferns as our local slabs do. Spores of other ferns lodge in the stems of many tree-ferns.

#29 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 30 April 2012 - 03:09 AM

Update - The biggest pitchers are now a bit over 50 mm. This is a "Typical" which normally only has pitchers up to a little over 40 mm. More proof that growing conditions can result in bigger pitchers on "Typical" plants. It is also growing much faster than the plants that were bigger than it, from the same batch, which are still in small pots.


Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Marcus B, 30 April 2012 - 03:14 AM.


#30 TheInactiveMoth

 
TheInactiveMoth
  • Full Members
  • 930 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nottingham, England
  • Interests:Arsenal & Notts County FC
    Ninjutsu
    Growing carnivorous plants
    Keeping tropical fish
    Playing guitar and piano
    Playing video games!
 

Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:18 AM

Genius setup! :D

#31 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:30 AM

Looking good :thumbsup:

#32 Daniel G

 
Daniel G
  • Full Members
  • 842 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Grenoside, Sheffield, UK (Great Britain)
  • Interests:Carnivorous Plants, Life, Answering Questions, Looking Handsome!
    Getting a better Sarracenia collection.
 

Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:38 AM

Very good results.
Maybe time for me to update my setup :)

Well done!

#33 Ewoud

 
Ewoud
  • Full Members
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Leuven
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants, sports, going out with friends
 

Posted 09 May 2012 - 16:13 PM

Nicely done! Looks very good

#34 bag1234

 
bag1234
  • Full Members
  • 32 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
 

Posted 12 May 2012 - 14:47 PM

Would this work well? http://www.blackjung...--9_p_1529.html

#35 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 13 May 2012 - 22:59 PM

Would this work well? http://www.blackjung...--9_p_1529.html


Let put it this way, it is a cleaned up version of what I used. It calls it a tree-fern root, but it is more likely all stem anyway. The hollowed out section is the hard core, which I removed to insert the Ceph. It is well worth trying.

#36 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 29 April 2013 - 04:05 AM

I have found one drawback of growing Cephs on Treefern. In consistently warm weather the plants die off more readily than pots that can be immersed in water. I have had my two well established plants die right back and lost one that I was trying to establish on Tree fern.

The survivors are starting to re-grow now the heat is over, but I was starting to think the Treefern was killing the Ceph until I realised that the other airy set ups were suffering the same problem. As the heat persisted, the problem spread through my collection.



#37 Ian_P

 
Ian_P
  • Full Members
  • 172 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wolverhampton
  • Interests:Reptiles, real ale and cider, computers, amateur (Ham) radio, astronomy, music, films, reading. I grow various varieties of chilli plants and CP's.
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:20 PM

I was recently looking at this website, http://www.dartfrog.co.uk/epiweb/ and having just read this thread, was wondering if this would perhaps be more suitable, as it includes a spray bar watering system (Integrated Irrigation System) which may help to keep the plants cooler on hot days.

Really like the idea and the plant looks great in the photo's.

Best regards,

Ian.

Edited by Ian_P, 02 May 2013 - 08:11 AM.


#38 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 22:48 PM

I bought a solar powered pump for that purpose but it has not proved to be very reliable. The issue is that during the recent summer we had a long period of warm weather without cool breaks. So pots stayed warm and the water I had around plants warmed up. I did not get the water changed as often I should have. Those open to the air also warmed up and stayed warm.
  • Ian_P likes this

#39 Marcus B

 
Marcus B
  • Full Members
  • 241 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Interests:CP, turtles, birds, native plants
 

Posted 31 October 2013 - 04:18 AM

Update on my Cephs growing on Tree-fern slabs.

It would seem that after a year of doing well on the Tree-fern that this experiment has failed. The moss started to die off and the cephs had to be removed (although I have left one to see if it survives). It would appear that the fern stem breaks down over time, making it unsuitable for Cephs in the long term. At a guess, I would say the nutient levels got too high for the Cephs to cope with.

I am currently trialing a basket pot on top of an ordinary pot as I have issue with growth coming out of the sides of baskets dying off when I have to raise water levels to keep them cool in summer. Not raising the water level seemed to result in the airy pots getting too warm on hot days.

#40 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,173 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:24 AM

That's a shame Marcus, especially as it looked like it was enjoying the conditions last year with some nice growth. Good luck with your new method.