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Sowing and growing of tropical lowland Nepenthes


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#1 Braunbear

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 13:53 PM

I got yesterday on 23/03/2011 my first Nepenthes seeds for own sowing. There were two flower envelopes, each with tons of 1cm filamentary seeds. The shape of the seeds has very surprised me and thought they look different.

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This morning I began to build a suitable seed-box. I used two different levels of white plastic boxes in A4 size for it. As substrate I had unfortunately left little peat, so I had to improvise and mixed with coarse ground bark chips from orchid soil and white perlite. The whole was thoroughly mixed with water and straightened. Then I sprinkled about half of their seeds on the ground and covered it with the other box half and put it on our balcony.

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In my room I made a small 10x10 cm pot which is covered with foil. This pot is near on my windowsill in the room. I'm wondering how long it takes until the first plants to germinate and which pot is faster.

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Here I have here the exact species Description:
Nepenthes rafflesiana "wing tendril alata with brown speckled colour"
Seed Origin: Indonesia, Singkawang area, West Kalimantan
Age of seed: 1.5 months, sowing on 24/03/2011

Edited by Braunbear, 28 July 2011 - 08:53 AM.


#2 nadja77

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 15:30 PM

Looking good! With so many seeds you should be able to get a good few seedlings!
It might be a good idea to cover the pots with a clear plastic to raise humidity.
Give them as much light as possible while trying to avoid cooking the pots and the seeds.
Good luck!!

#3 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 18:35 PM

It might be a good idea to cover the pots with a clear plastic to raise humidity.


I 100% totally agree... I usually sow my Nep seeds in a smaller pot, then I water it

until it drips from bottom, then I bag it up and seal it completely...Here are pics of

my recent succesful Albomarginata seedlings( One seedling is pitchering already);

http://i1187.photobu.../Plants/1-1.jpg

http://i1187.photobu.../Plants/2-1.jpg

http://i1187.photobu...74/Plants/3.jpg

http://i1187.photobu...74/Plants/4.jpg


It took about 3 - 3 1/2 months before it germinated...

Edited by dchasselblad74, 24 March 2011 - 20:22 PM.


#4 Braunbear

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 18:48 PM

Thank you, for your answers and pictures.

Of course, I have covered my large box with another (clear) plastic box for larger humidity.
The night temperatures are still too cold, so I bring it in the afternoon into my room.

My small pot in my room is covered with a transparent film.

Greetings
Thomas

#5 Braunbear

 
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Posted 27 March 2011 - 15:11 PM

I want to give even a small update of my seed.
Signs of a first Nepenthes seedling after 3 days in the small pot with foil. Is this possible so quickly?
Sorry for the bad photo through the film, but I wanted not disturb the air humidity.

Posted Image

Edited by Braunbear, 27 March 2011 - 15:18 PM.


#6 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 27 March 2011 - 16:18 PM

3 days seem a little too fast...Make sure it's not fungus...

#7 Braunbear

 
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Posted 17 April 2011 - 17:45 PM

3 days seem a little too fast...Make sure it's not fungus...

You are right, that was a little fungus. I threw this one away.

After 4 weeks there are no signs of growing. I hope they will grow soon.

On 12.04.2011, I had sown N. reinwardtiana "red" seeds into my Box too.

Edited by Braunbear, 17 April 2011 - 17:53 PM.


#8 Braunbear

 
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Posted 01 May 2011 - 08:28 AM

Yippieh, it worked! I counted today, the first real N. rafflesiana seedlings in my little pot (3 pieces). A picture follows during the day when my camera battery is charged. I'm really happy that my first Nepenthes sowing is successful. :dance4:

In the large seed-box so far is nothing to see.

#9 Braunbear

 
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Posted 01 May 2011 - 15:28 PM

Here, as I promised, the photo. Below left are already 2 leaves of a plant and top right you will see the green top of a seedling.
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Edited by Braunbear, 01 May 2011 - 15:34 PM.


#10 Braunbear

 
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Posted 19 May 2011 - 12:02 PM

I would like to share an update of my germination progress. We see my small breeding pot wich is covered with foil. The pot was always in the west window where it is getting getting full sun at afternoon . In total there were 10 seeds in it, which I have so far 4 small seedlings which now produce the first carnivorous leaves. These are still very small, only 3-4mm. Last week I cut with scissors, 2 small holes through the foil for better air circulation. The pot itself has a moss-created jungle if one can call it that. Enclosed are the photos of today.
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Unfortunately, in my big breeding box there is nothing to see anything yet. Probably the humidity is to low by the large area? In the photo you can see so far only isolate green moss, but no seeds germinated. I haven't use an additional lighting.
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#11 TheInactiveMoth

 
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Posted 19 May 2011 - 18:10 PM

Wow Thomas! I love the photos! This thread is useful to me, because soon I'll be growing Nepenthes Albomarginata from seed.
Thanks!

#12 Braunbear

 
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Posted 29 June 2011 - 20:31 PM

Total: N. reinwardtiana "red" 11 pieces
N. rafflesiana var. alata 15 pieces
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Update N. rafflesiana, small pot:
06.06.2011
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29.06.2011
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Update N. reinwardtiana "red": 06.06.2011
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29.06.2011
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Greetings, Thomas.

Edited by Braunbear, 29 June 2011 - 20:38 PM.


#13 Braunbear

 
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Posted 28 July 2011 - 09:07 AM

Update: 28.07.2011

My goodness, again around a month. That is quick. Let's see what has been happening in my breeding in the last time.

I count up now following amount of seedlings:
N. rafflesiana var. alata = 19 seedlings
N. reinwardtiana "red" = 9 seedlings

The best growth occurs in my little rafflesiana pot. The plastic wrap is still on it. The moss has grown very high, which will benefit the humidity. It was not easy to make a good picture of it. The seedlings here already show a rosette-like growth. After almost three months now they are 1 centimeter in size.
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The other seedlings also growing well, although more slowly. The oldest N. reinwardtiana seedlings have 2 carnivorous leaves at the age of 2 months.
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Here I have a picture of the whole breeding box. For better humidity here, I used as a cover upside down clear plastic packaging from tomatoes. I spray it regularly with water.
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I hope you like my montly report. I have change the title of my topic for better information.

Until next time!
Regards Thomas

#14 jb_orchidguy

 
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Posted 29 September 2011 - 14:01 PM

Awesome! How are they coming along now? I have 5 trays of verious seed sown and so far no strikes, but I am still hopeful.

#15 Braunbear

 
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Posted 05 November 2011 - 19:21 PM

After a little absence, I want to show you the update of my Nepenthes breeding for November 2011.

Overview:
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Detailed view: Nepenthes rafflesiana var. alata
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Detailed view: Nepenthes reinwardtiana red
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#16 Braunbear

 
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Posted 26 February 2012 - 10:33 AM

Update 26. February 2012

I've bought in the meantime, an additional LED table lamp for better lighting. This was well received by the small Nepenthes. The observations, it appears that N. reinwardtiana (lower rows) are stronger than the N. rafflesiana, although my culture conditions are the same.

I think they have ended the status of a seedling and I can call them young plants. So far I have not seen any appreciable coloration of the pitchers. They are all still very green.

My photo camera is not very good for macro shots. It took me several attempts until a halfway decent photo are done. :wacko:

Enjoy the pictures. ;)

Overview:
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Detail: Nepenthes reinwardtiana "red"
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Detail: Nepenthes rafflesiana var. alata
Posted Image

Edited by Braunbear, 26 February 2012 - 10:37 AM.


#17 nadja77

 
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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:24 PM

Your plants are looking great! I always find it very rewarding to have my efforts finally pay off by getting some decent growth after the seemingly endless tiny seedling stage. My N.reinwardtiana seedlings are nowhere near that far. I find that plants in an airier mix grow better and, for all I can tell, quicker, so my medium contains a lot of perlite to help drainage and aerate the roots.

#18 manders

 
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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:54 PM

Reinwardtiana is not as lowland as rafflesiana and the leaves have a waxy coating which makes them quite easy to grow in most rooms so it makes sense they would grow faster, raffs really like warmer temps year round, growing at room temps can be very hit or miss with a few degrees making a huge difference.

#19 Braunbear

 
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Posted 27 February 2012 - 18:31 PM

Reinwardtiana is not as lowland as rafflesiana and the leaves have a waxy coating which makes them quite easy to grow in most rooms so it makes sense they would grow faster, raffs really like warmer temps year round, growing at room temps can be very hit or miss with a few degrees making a huge difference.


Hello manders,

thank you for your answer. Now I understand the different growth of both species. After my internet search, I found that N. reinwardtiana is an Intermediate Plant (1000m - 1500m) and N. rafflesiana ist a true lowland plant (500m - 1000m). Both species require a bit different temperatures. My Hometown is at 200m over the sea. My room temperatures also correspond to the N. reinwardtiana species.

Nepenthes reinwardtiana (0-2200 m)
Day: 24-29°C / Night: 13-18° C

Nepenthes rafflesiana (0-1500 m)
Day: 27-32°C / Night: 18-21° C

Source: Nepenthes Altitudinal Distribution Chart

Kind regards,
Thomas

#20 Braunbear

 
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Posted 13 July 2012 - 18:35 PM

Update: July 2012

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Greetings
Thomas