Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Passiflora foetida


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 giuseppe

 
giuseppe
  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain
  • Interests:Wildlife, travelling, succulent plants, orchids, CP's, ferns, tropical bulbs, etc....
 

Posted 17 March 2011 - 11:18 AM

During my last trip to Madagascar I came across to a beautiful Passiflora (surely introduced) whose flowers and fruits were surrounded by sticky bracts. I identified it as Passiflora foetida, and found that it is considered a protocarnivorous plant. Anybody knows more about it and its "digestive" capacity?

Giuseppe

#2 mobile

 
mobile
  • Global Moderator
  • 4,354 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants & hydroculture.
 

Posted 17 March 2011 - 12:15 PM

I remember reading a paper on this species. Possibly this one: http://bit.ly/hzLJld

Edited by mobile, 17 March 2011 - 12:16 PM.


#3 giuseppe

 
giuseppe
  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain
  • Interests:Wildlife, travelling, succulent plants, orchids, CP's, ferns, tropical bulbs, etc....
 

Posted 17 March 2011 - 15:01 PM

Thank you! Very interesting article..! I add a couple of picture of fruits and flowers


I remember reading a paper on this species. Possibly this one: http://bit.ly/hzLJld



Posted Image


Posted Image

Edited by giuseppe, 17 March 2011 - 15:01 PM.


#4 Siggi_Hartmeyer

 
Siggi_Hartmeyer
  • Full Members
  • 198 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Weil am Rhein - Germany
  • Interests:Our CP collection and private CP-video production
 

Posted 17 March 2011 - 15:09 PM

I remember reading a paper on this species. Possibly this one: http://bit.ly/hzLJld


Passiflora foetida develops a resinous glue which is non-polar and any proteolytic enzymes simply cannot function, which is the same situation in Roridula and Ledothamnus. Only plants with polar acid aqueous glue like Drosera, Drosophyllum, Pinguicula and Triphyophyllum are able to make use of proteolytic enzymes. The sticky tentacles of Passiflora foetida are only in defence to protect the riping fruit, catching lots of small fruit flies hindering them to place their eggs into the fruit.

Looking at the above mentioned article I can only shake my head. The anylyzing method works finally as a self-fullfilling experiment which must result in the finding of enzymes, but not produced by the plant, but by adhering insect victims and/or bacteria. Some years ago I received an article written for The Biologist and based on the above article for a peer-review. My reply, based on my knowledge in anlytical chemistry was that the analytical method lookes like an April 1 joke to me, and that plants with non-polar resinous glue need i.e mutualistic bugs like Pameridea to break down prey with proteolytic enzymes, but cannot produce such enzymes with their own tentacles. Probably such enzymes would start to digest the resin itself. Interestingly, if not to say funny, since I returned that peer-review about 6 or 7 years ago, I found my formulation meanwhile in some further publications: Proteolytic enzymes need a polar acid aqueous medium to function, therefore plants with resinous non-polar glue need a symbioses to make use of their caught victims and thus to become really carnivorous.

#5 giuseppe

 
giuseppe
  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain
  • Interests:Wildlife, travelling, succulent plants, orchids, CP's, ferns, tropical bulbs, etc....
 

Posted 17 March 2011 - 22:44 PM

Thank you Siggi, very clear explaination!

Passiflora foetida develops a resinous glue which is non-polar and any proteolytic enzymes simply cannot function, which is the same situation in Roridula and Ledothamnus. Only plants with polar acid aqueous glue like Drosera, Drosophyllum, Pinguicula and Triphyophyllum are able to make use of proteolytic enzymes. The sticky tentacles of Passiflora foetida are only in defence to protect the riping fruit, catching lots of small fruit flies hindering them to place their eggs into the fruit.

Looking at the above mentioned article I can only shake my head. The anylyzing method works finally as a self-fullfilling experiment which must result in the finding of enzymes, but not produced by the plant, but by adhering insect victims and/or bacteria. Some years ago I received an article written for The Biologist and based on the above article for a peer-review. My reply, based on my knowledge in anlytical chemistry was that the analytical method lookes like an April 1 joke to me, and that plants with non-polar resinous glue need i.e mutualistic bugs like Pameridea to break down prey with proteolytic enzymes, but cannot produce such enzymes with their own tentacles. Probably such enzymes would start to digest the resin itself. Interestingly, if not to say funny, since I returned that peer-review about 6 or 7 years ago, I found my formulation meanwhile in some further publications: Proteolytic enzymes need a polar acid aqueous medium to function, therefore plants with resinous non-polar glue need a symbioses to make use of their caught victims and thus to become really carnivorous.



#6 Vic2

 
Vic2
  • Full Members
  • 585 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Letchworth Garden City
 

Posted 18 March 2011 - 11:28 AM

Any indications of symbiotic predators associating with Passiflora foetida?

#7 Siggi_Hartmeyer

 
Siggi_Hartmeyer
  • Full Members
  • 198 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Weil am Rhein - Germany
  • Interests:Our CP collection and private CP-video production
 

Posted 18 March 2011 - 16:17 PM

P. foetida grows naturally in the warmer parts of the Americas, but I have no information on mutualistic arthropods there. Could be actually interesting to take a look. Unfortunately it is a very invasive species, beautiful and interesting flowers (as giuseppe's nice pictures show) but a dangerous weed for natural vegetation which becomes overgrown by the long vines. It has been introduced to many tropical countries world wide. 10 years ago I was really surprised to find lots of P. foetida overgrowing the natural vegetation around Kununurra in Australia, and even filmed the plants.

Therefore observations on a possible natural mutualistic relation should be taken in the USA, Central- or Southamerica. Of course, it could be possible that particular domestic arthropodes occasionally take some benefit from the flies sticking to the very effective tentacles. And their dropings could be placed on the Passiflora as additional nutrition, but that is more likely cleptoparasitism and not a symbiosis.

Edited by Siggi_Hartmeyer, 18 March 2011 - 16:21 PM.


#8 Vic2

 
Vic2
  • Full Members
  • 585 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Letchworth Garden City
 

Posted 18 March 2011 - 16:37 PM

Of course, it could be possible that particular domestic arthropodes occasionally take some benefit from the flies sticking to the very effective tentacles. And their dropings could be placed on the Passiflora as additional nutrition, but that is more likely cleptoparasitism and not a symbiosis.


Danke, Siggi :yes:

Not sure it can be classed as kleptoparasitism, though:
The plant would not actually be stealing the poo against the arthropod's will - it's more of a "free gift" (ein Geschenk gratis), as it were!! :wub:

Or possibly a mutually beneficial exchange ("proto"-symbiosis?) if the scavenging arthropods eat the trapped victims...

Tchüß,

Vic

#9 Aurélien

 
Aurélien
  • Full Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nancy (North East France)
 

Posted 12 April 2011 - 18:09 PM

I grow this plant at Nancy Botanical Garden to show the "potential carnivorous" to the public, because of a less information about these plants by other BGs, but I don't know his invasive potential.
A new "great theme" of the garden is invasive species, to inform and sensibilise people. This plant may entre in these two subject, that's interessant !
That's right it grow and sprout very fastly and seeds have an excellent germination potential ! a perfect invasive in tropical latitude...

#10 tropicbreeze

 
tropicbreeze
  • Full Members
  • 99 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Noonamah, Australia
 

Posted 08 September 2011 - 12:54 PM

This species is incredibly invasive, and there's no effective way of controlling it. The fruits are soft and easily broken open by birds. They eat the flesh and seed. The seed passes through the birds and is spread widely, packaged in it's own fertiliser.