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Earthworms?


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#1 mattynatureboy44

 
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Posted 01 March 2011 - 22:48 PM

Upon tidying up my outdoor carnivorous bog, I came accross quite a few earth worms actually in the peat, are they going to cause any problems in there? or are they harmless to my bog and plants?

#2 will9

 
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Posted 01 March 2011 - 23:16 PM

Upon tidying up my outdoor carnivorous bog, I came accross quite a few earth worms actually in the peat, are they going to cause any problems in there? or are they harmless to my bog and plants?



She are totally harmless for plants and bog,

#3 trauts2002

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 16:55 PM

I would have to say in my eyes they could actually be beneficial,
Worms feed on dead plant matter turning it to a compost state and they are excellent help at airating soil in the garden,
this is good as it means more air pockets in and around the plants helping the roots breath.

#4 Amar

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 17:21 PM

not sure if they're good...

http://www.cpukforum...mp;hl=earthworm

#5 mattynatureboy44

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 18:49 PM

I did wander if they would have any negative affects on the bog, I am gonna have to leave them for now, and see how it goes it is full of worms and I have no idea why?

#6 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 18:52 PM

But as far as earthworms neutralizing the acids in the natural bogs, consider the tons of pine trees that deposit tons of pine needles directly on top and eventually decays releasing very acidic juices back into the bogs. So even if there were worms in the bogs, pine needles constantly replenish acidity....This is why I always chop up some dried pine needles and place them on top of all my outdoor CP pots and bogs..

#7 Daniel G

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 19:25 PM

Worm's are loved by gardener's for making the soil "new" Or more fertile, but that fertile soil is less acidic, and not suitable for carnivorous plant's, i would get rid of em' :moderator:

#8 mattynatureboy44

 
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Posted 02 March 2011 - 22:55 PM

Worm's are loved by gardener's for making the soil "new" Or more fertile, but that fertile soil is less acidic, and not suitable for carnivorous plant's, i would get rid of em' :vinsent:


Wish I could but have no way of doing so really, the bog is quite large took 7 or 8 bales of peat to fill not including sand, and I could never get them out without removing it all and disturbing the plants etc.

#9 Alexis

 
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Posted 03 March 2011 - 00:58 AM

Earthworms aren't great in pots, but should be less of a problem in a big peat bog.

Just keep an eye on the plants. If they all declines, you could have a suspect. If they're thriving, don't worry!

#10 F R e N c H 3 z

 
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Posted 03 March 2011 - 01:36 AM

Wish I could but have no way of doing so really, the bog is quite large took 7 or 8 bales of peat to fill not including sand, and I could never get them out without removing it all and disturbing the plants etc.


While the effects of their presence seems debated, if you were very intent on getting rid of them flooding the bog for a few days would surely get rid of them.

#11 wadave

 
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Posted 12 March 2011 - 07:51 AM

I've had worms move into the pots in my greenhouse and I find they do eat the peat.

In my opinion their digestive systems would release the nutrients from the peat and after they excrete what's left I'm sure if you allowed it to build up it would affect the plants.

But seeing as the average repot for a cp in a pot is every year or two it's not too much of a problem. In a bog over a long number of years this could be a problem if you have a large number of worms. It's just my opinion and I can't verify it though.

I guess, as others have mentioned, you could watch to see what happens over time and if they do start to show signs of stress you may need to do something about it.

Dave.

#12 jimscott

 
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Posted 12 March 2011 - 15:43 PM

Earthworms aren't great in pots, but should be less of a problem in a big peat bog.

Just keep an eye on the plants. If they all declines, you could have a suspect. If they're thriving, don't worry!


This is probably the best answer. In nature, the ecosystem is kept in balance. In our little microcosm, we are only provided a less than balanced ecosystem. Worms in our pots are to the exclusion of other variables needed to keep things in check. It's just like having a 10 gallon fishtank. It needs help (filter, heater, artifical lighting, artificial food,....) and one small change can wipe a tank out (ich, columnaris)...