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How to keep the humidity up in my tank


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#1 danthecpman

 
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Posted 25 December 2010 - 13:06 PM

Hi,

This is probably an easy question but i am having trouble keeping the humidity above 60% in my tank, The tank is 24" x 15" x 12" with one 25W T8 strip light.I am currently hoping to grow highland nepenthes and a few heliamphora in it but like i say the humidity wont stay high enough for my neps.

Any help is greatly appreciated

Merry Christmas!!!

Dan

#2 Amar

 
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Posted 25 December 2010 - 13:11 PM

Hmmm...have you closed off the vents?

You can also keep a container filled with water in the tank.

Edited by Amar, 25 December 2010 - 13:12 PM.


#3 danthecpman

 
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Posted 25 December 2010 - 15:55 PM

Hmmm...have you closed off the vents?

You can also keep a container filled with water in the tank.



Hi Amar,

I havent not yet as i wasnt sure if they needed good air circulation but i will shut them now :cheers: I have just found out a tray i can fill with water and put in

Thanks a bunch

Dan

#4 flycatchers

 
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Posted 25 December 2010 - 16:37 PM

Hi Dan
60% humidity is more than enough for most neps. Indeed good air movement is even more beneficial than humidity.
I used to heat one of my tanks but the neps went soft in growth and were not happy with the dripping humidity it gave. Without any heat (apart from the light) they grew far stronger.

cheers

bill

#5 Phil Green

 
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Posted 25 December 2010 - 20:35 PM

I 2nd everything Bill has just said. 60% is about all my highlanders get, and I tend to keep the window open.

#6 danthecpman

 
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Posted 27 December 2010 - 15:26 PM

Hi,

After making the adjustments to my tank the humidity stays around 65% (day) and 75-80% (night). The temperatures stay around 25 degrees C (day) and 15 degrees C (night). Do you reckon this is ok for my nepenthes now?

Kind regards
Dan

#7 RL7836

 
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Posted 05 January 2011 - 00:04 AM

.....but like i say the humidity wont stay high enough for my neps.

I'm curious why you think this? What are your Neps doing that make you think they need more humidity?

Do you reckon this is ok for my nepenthes now?

I don't mean for this to sound sarcastic - but what do your Neps think?

Often plants are grown in high humidity and can need to be acclimated to lower levels - but that doesn't mean that they cannot thrive with medium to lower levels.

Over the past few years, I've received a number of small non-hybrid Heli's. Thankfully, all have grown well almost from day one - except for the supposedly bombproof hybrid H 'Tequila'. Since it was in a tank with several other new Heli's that were doing well and sending out new pitchers, it took me a while to realize that they must have been previously been grown in very high humidity and needed some help before they would be happy in medium levels. Sure enough, once in higher humidity - the plants are producing new pitchers.

I recently needed to move a N. eymae (BE - aka: N. maxima) from a tank to my windowsill - so there was a dramatic lowering in humidity levels. While I expected to see some 'pouting' (with a possible need for intervention), I never saw anything except ongoing excellent growth & pitcher formation.

In both situations, I 'assumed' something - which was wrong/invalid - and just needed to observe the plant and listen to the signals it sent to me to see what it really needed...