Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

How long does a dormancy HAVE to be


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 carnivoor

 
carnivoor
  • Full Members
  • 277 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oudenaarde,Belgium
 

Posted 08 December 2010 - 22:22 PM

I was thinking about my plants being dormant for about 4 weeks now(it was relatively warm here until the frost set in) and now I'm wondering how long the dormancy HAS to last.
I know it wouldn't be wise to take the plants in now(still frozen more or less solid) because they would turn into mush but in theory if you had the chance to take them in a cool place and could slowly warm them up and then put them under lights to avoid spindly growth , how long would they minimum need to be dormant to still get the full affect from the dormancy?
Anyone here ever done some experimenting with the dormancy periods?

#2 mantrid

 
mantrid
  • Full Members
  • 1,246 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Wales
  • Interests:Sculpting in Bronze. Please visit realbronzes.com and see some of my work
 

Posted 08 December 2010 - 22:56 PM

I was thinking about my plants being dormant for about 4 weeks now(it was relatively warm here until the frost set in) and now I'm wondering how long the dormancy HAS to last.
I know it wouldn't be wise to take the plants in now(still frozen more or less solid) because they would turn into mush but in theory if you had the chance to take them in a cool place and could slowly warm them up and then put them under lights to avoid spindly growth , how long would they minimum need to be dormant to still get the full affect from the dormancy?
Anyone here ever done some experimenting with the dormancy periods?



It will happen naturally in the spring. You dont need to worry about lights and other such paraphernalia.

#3 numpty

 
numpty
  • Full Members
  • 296 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Taiwan
 

Posted 09 December 2010 - 02:30 AM

It will happen naturally in the spring. You dont need to worry about lights and other such paraphernalia.

Still an interesting question though ... I also would be curious to know if anyone's played around with different dormancy periods.

The last "winter" that I grew VFTs here, they only got about two months of what could pass for dormancy. Temps almost never dipped below 10, and were often over 20, so the dormancy was really just two months in the shade with barely damp soil. When I put them back in the sun at the start of February they did everything they were supposed to do ... put up flowers, strong growth, etc. I can't speak for their long-term growth after that, as I moved away and had to give them all up, but they seemed to be doing well when I left them. Of course they might have done even better with a longer and harsher dormancy, but they got by on a limited one.

#4 Alexis

 
Alexis
  • Global Moderator
  • 3,287 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester / Whalley
 

Posted 09 December 2010 - 11:59 AM

Interesting that Wilmington, NC (VFT natural habitat) is looking at a low of -8C in a couple of nights, possibly putting the record of -9C set in 1960 under threat.

#5 carnivoor

 
carnivoor
  • Full Members
  • 277 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oudenaarde,Belgium
 

Posted 09 December 2010 - 23:01 PM

It will happen naturally in the spring. You dont need to worry about lights and other such paraphernalia.


I have no intention of bringing my plants in , but there must be places in the world where there is a shorter "cold" period and where they still grow sarrs and VFTs without too many problems.
People who grow cp's in say southern europe wouldn't have the long winters we have , let's face it ; we'd be worrying about the first frost and their plants would most likely still be growing.(although this year frost here was about a month later than usual)
But I'm assuming there must be people who can keep healthy plants in the long run but with a shorter dormancy, so it would be nice if they could fill us in about how long their plants sleep.
I think the dormancy here is somewhere between 5 and 6 months(never really paid much attention ,the plants wake up when they think it's time to wake up)

#6 MH1

 
MH1
  • Full Members
  • 49 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Yorkshire
 

Posted 10 December 2010 - 15:19 PM

I thnk there are is a sarracenia nursery or a grower with a lot of Sarracenia in southern Florida in the West Palm Beachish (ish being an imprtant add on) area, where it barely has a winter, the plants all looked very healthy... I came across some of their photos on an American cp forum when I was trying to find out about the same thing :) maybe someone else knows the people/person I am talking about...

#7 svekke

 
svekke
  • Full Members
  • 21 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kampenhout Belgium
 

Posted 12 December 2010 - 20:25 PM

I know someone who placed a dormant sarracenia in his warm living room on a windowsill while it was dormant in Janauary. And without additional lighting.
Needless to say this resulted in flat, barely carnivorous foliage.. So I wouldn't recommend shorter dormancy to anyone if not necessary!
I assume that even with additional lighting it's very hard to get nice pitcher form, or coloring without enough sunlight.

@ MH1: My aunt lives also near West Palm beach, and the last winter they experienced temps just below freezing point for a few nights. And many nights with low temps. So I think it's the ideal, if not very close to their natural habitat, for a sarracenia nursery.

Back on topic: I assume sarracenia can survive with a very mild dormancy for a few years, as long they have some kind of resting period.

#8 Peabody

 
Peabody
  • Full Members
  • 162 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Leeds
  • Interests:I am mostly interested in VFT's but I am having a go at Cephalotus.
 

Posted 12 December 2010 - 20:37 PM

I have brought a Dionaea B52 from outside in my greenhouse to my living room windowcill where I keep the curtains closed all the time and the minimum temperature has been down to about 6 centigrade during the coldest weather we have just had (in the UK). Some of the traps have died off but some are OK. The conditions that plants experience in the wild I don't think should be regarded as being the optimum ones for growing impressive specimens for our entertainment.

#9 buch

 
buch
  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the Netherlands
  • Interests:pinguicula, heliamphora, genlisea
 

Posted 16 January 2011 - 17:49 PM

A commercial grower that I knew 20 years ago, dug out his VFT's twice a year. He put them in the fridge for 2 months in big bags with spaghnum and potted it all up again.
He said that hey got mature faster than normal. Maybe this is only possible with VFT's.
I prefer nature to go its way and feed them a some proteins.
Anyway, dormancy can be somewhat shorter.

Menno

#10 mantrid

 
mantrid
  • Full Members
  • 1,246 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Wales
  • Interests:Sculpting in Bronze. Please visit realbronzes.com and see some of my work
 

Posted 16 January 2011 - 18:42 PM

A commercial grower that I knew 20 years ago, dug out his VFT's twice a year. He put them in the fridge for 2 months in big bags with spaghnum and potted it all up again.
He said that hey got mature faster than normal. Maybe this is only possible with VFT's.
I prefer nature to go its way and feed them a some proteins.
Anyway, dormancy can be somewhat shorter.

Menno



Why would he dig them out twice a year?

#11 David Ahrens

 
David Ahrens
  • Full Members
  • 353 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Essex, UK
  • Interests:CP's, photography.
 

Posted 17 January 2011 - 15:46 PM

I grow my Sarracenia oreophila on a kitchen windowsill. In November, I put them in my lock-up garage. I keep them very dry, just giving them five minutes water every two weeks. I have just taken them out of the garage this weekend and put them on the windowsill, I make that dormancy period about eight weeks. I find this about right for me from experience.
On the subject of VFT's, I can't grow them in the flat, I think that it is just too warm for them over the year. Some other people manage to grow them but I can't crack it.

#12 buch

 
buch
  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the Netherlands
  • Interests:pinguicula, heliamphora, genlisea
 

Posted 18 January 2011 - 22:05 PM

at that time at speeded growth, in his opinion.