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polination ?


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#1 will9

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 14:42 PM

I not know anything about polinate sarra,how can you be sure it selfed polination?
How you know wath X wath ?Are there insekts in Europe that polinate the flower?
10 years ago i have 1 plant of sarracenia ,this came in flower but give no seeds ,after a few years i become more sarra and all flowers i have then came in seeds ,so i think there must be polinaters here ,there for i ask how i must do for beeing sure the seeds are what i set on the etiket!
I never have cultivate seeds from my cactus because i never been sure i am the first one that polinate this,is it the same whit sarra and must you see there are no other flowers?
Cheers Willy

#2 Alexis

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 14:45 PM

Bees pollinate the flowers.

You need to do it manually with a paintbrush to be sure you will get seed.

#3 will9

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 15:24 PM

Bees pollinate the flowers.

You need to do it manually with a paintbrush to be sure you will get seed.


If bees polinate ,what must you do for be sure it s selfed?
I never polinate any flower but every flower set seeds !!
Many people sell seeds ,how can she know it s from that specific plant,i do notting and have seeds on every flower?

Edited by will9, 02 December 2010 - 15:30 PM.


#4 Alexis

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 15:47 PM

They are specifically designed not to self-pollinate.

Something must be pollinating them for them to set seed.

#5 will9

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 16:00 PM

They are specifically designed not to self-pollinate.

Something must be pollinating them for them to set seed.


I not polinate ,so i think bees did this,my question now is ,i have for excample 20 flava from different localitys if i have a seedpot from each whitout doing anything ,are this all selfed or are she polinate whit bees?
In this case i can not sell anything whit a loc. because i not know and i can sell meaby only seeds from flava,i not sure for this becausse i have other sarra in the same bog,so meaby the are all crossings!So what do growers for be sure it s the riht plant,if i do notting for protection i not know if this is polinate by bees!
I buy many seeds from loc .plants ,can i be sure this is riht?
Cheers Willy

#6 linuxman

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 18:38 PM

I not polinate ,so i think bees did this,my question now is ,i have for excample 20 flava from different localitys if i have a seedpot from each whitout doing anything ,are this all selfed or are she polinate whit bees?
In this case i can not sell anything whit a loc. because i not know and i can sell meaby only seeds from flava,i not sure for this becausse i have other sarra in the same bog,so meaby the are all crossings!So what do growers for be sure it s the riht plant,if i do notting for protection i not know if this is polinate by bees!
I buy many seeds from loc .plants ,can i be sure this is riht?
Cheers Willy

I think what they do is transfer the pollen from one plant (or the same) to the stigma with a paintbrush as has already been mentioned. Then they cover the flower with something like a muslin bag to ensure no further pollination takes place. Also it's recommended to insert the paintbrush into the soil of the pot where the pollen came from so there's no confusion. Or make sure you clean the brush thoroughly. This way you know exactly what's pollinating what.

#7 will9

 
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Posted 02 December 2010 - 19:01 PM

I think what they do is transfer the pollen from one plant (or the same) to the stigma with a paintbrush as has already been mentioned. Then they cover the flower with something like a muslin bag to ensure no further pollination takes place. Also it's recommended to insert the paintbrush into the soil of the pot where the pollen came from so there's no confusion. Or make sure you clean the brush thoroughly. This way you know exactly what's pollinating what.


Thanks this is exactly what i want to know! :biggrin: Now i can makes seeds to for sell next year!
I hope everyone that sell seeds know this and do this before she have visit from a bee,but i think not only bees polinate this ,i have seen many flies on to the flower covered whit some pollen when in flower,i have seen not a single bee this year!!!
cheers Willy

Edited by will9, 02 December 2010 - 19:06 PM.


#8 linuxman

 
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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:05 AM

Here's a good tutorial on Sarracenia pollination by Brooks Garcia which may be useful.

#9 will9

 
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Posted 03 January 2011 - 13:41 PM

Here's a good tutorial on Sarracenia pollination by Brooks Garcia which may be useful.


Hi Thanks ,this is what i looking for,
Cheers Will

#10 smudge

 
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Posted 02 March 2012 - 21:57 PM

Bit late posting on this thread as its now 2012, but its exactly the info i've been looking for since Christmas.

What a great site this is.

#11 linuxman

 
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Posted 03 March 2012 - 14:03 PM

What I found last year was that any flower I didn't manually pollinate produced very few or no seeds at all. Maybe that European bees and insects aren't designed for pollinating sarracenia. So not sure if the flower bagging is really necessary. What are other peoples experiences?

#12 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 03 March 2012 - 15:17 PM

plants outside seem to set seeds fine, not sure if its insects or the wind

#13 ada

 
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Posted 03 March 2012 - 16:51 PM

My purps outside are pollinated by small bumble bees,(small orangey colourd ones)every year i get loads of seed this way.
The plants in the greenhouse are different,unless i pollinate them myself i get nothing at all.
ada

#14 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 03 March 2012 - 18:18 PM

My purps outside are pollinated by small bumble bees,(small orangey colourd ones)


probably carders, my favourite

#15 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 03 March 2012 - 18:53 PM

The purpurea in the bog near me definitely produce seed with insects' help.

#16 meizwang

 
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Posted 05 March 2012 - 18:29 PM

Here in Northern California, we rarely have insects or other animals pollinate Sarracenia flowers. Honey bees, bumble bees, and other insects are frequently found in the flowers, but for some reason, they don't end up pollinating them-probably because of their size.

However, if a hummingbird finds your plants, they're very effective at pollinating Sarracenia flowers. Interestingly, they only pollinated S. oreophila and a tub of flavas-perhaps nothing else was in bloom at the time. In the past 15 years, this has only happened once-outside of the hummingbird incident, my plants never produce seeds without hand pollination.

#17 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 05 March 2012 - 20:46 PM

If only we had hummingbirds here!