Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' DT14


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 PofW_Feathers

 
PofW_Feathers
  • Full Members
  • 75 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the Far East
 

Posted 31 October 2010 - 02:14 AM

Title: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' DT14

Konnchiwa!

CS14 and CS15 are unusual Byblis rorida forms that were found by my friend along the Gibb River Road, Kimberley, Western Australia. Both forms have short glands only and no long bristle-like glands on its sepals as found on typical Byblis rorida type forms. I have labeled both as CS14: Byblis rorida and CS15: Byblis rorida.

I found DT14 among many progeny clones of CS14 which I have labeled DT14 "Byblis rorida ‘non-bristle, unique flowered form' has short glands only and no long bristle-like glands on its sepals as found on typical Byblis rorida type forms. It also has a unique flower character of additional petal appendages on the adaxial (front) surface of the petals.
(The CS and DT letters and numbers are my abbreviation codes for the different clones I am working with.)

I was hopeful that the unique flower character of DT14 would follow the Mendelism inheritance pathway and keep its unique flower character. This year it appears a few clones raised from my work with DT14, have gone against the Mendelism genetic laws of inheritance and lost their unique flower character. I'm not sure whether or not this unique flower character in DT14 will follow Mendel’s inheritance laws in the future and always produce clones that have this unique flower character.

I’m guessing that the gene for the unique flower character of “additional petal appendages on the adaxial (front) surface of the petals” of DT14 already existed in the wild.

In the process of the selection breeding. I thought the unique flower character of DT14 was a recessive gene. I do not think (but I am not 100% sure) that it is a superior gene. My prediction of all of this year's clones having the unique flower character was not quite correct. Unfortunately, a couple of clones of DT14 produced normal flowers. Also the unique flower character arrangement on the petal surfaces was a bit variable. Please see attached photo taken this year of this petal variation. In conclusion I can report that the majority of DT14 clones this year have produced the unique flower character.

This unique flower character of DT14 character seems to be still in the process of the mutation. Please see the photo 4, the anthers of left flower have changed into the small petals.

DT14, CS14 and CS15 all have the typical character unique to Byblis rorida of beautiful dew like sessile glands covering the shoot apex.

Please see photo 6: There are always many long stalked (bristle like) glands on the sepals of normal variations of Byblis rorida.

Please see the photo 5: There are shorter stalked glands only on the sepals of DT14 non bristle-unique flower form.

Please see the photo 7: The abaxial (back) petal surface striped character of DT14 unique flower form is not unusual, but I like it very much!

photo 1: Byblis rorida 'non bristle, unique flowered form' DT14
photo 2: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS14
photo 3: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS15
photo 4: two types of DT14's flower
photo 5: close up of DT14's sepals
photo 6: close up of normal Byblis rorida's sepals
photo 7: the adaxial (front) surface and the abaxial (back) surface of DT14 flowers

Kind regards

Posted Image
photo 1: Byblis rorida 'non bristle, unique flowered form' DT14

Posted Image
photo 2: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS14

Posted Image
photo 3: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS15

Posted Image
photo 4: two types of DT14's flower

Posted Image
photo 5: close up of DT14's sepals

Posted Image
photo 6: close up of normal Byblis rorida's sepals

Posted Image
photo 7: the adaxial surface and the abaxial surface of DT14 flowers

#2 Fernando Rivadavia

 
Fernando Rivadavia
  • Full Members
  • 1,801 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Now in San Francisco, California
  • Interests:CPs in the wild, especially Drosera, Pinguicula, Genlisea, and Utrics
 

Posted 31 October 2010 - 07:25 AM

Beautiful, congrats!!!

F

#3 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 31 October 2010 - 20:44 PM

Those are beautiful!

#4 Greg Allan

 
Greg Allan
  • Full Members
  • 1,194 posts
  • Location:Harborne, Birmingham, UK
 

Posted 01 November 2010 - 19:01 PM

Astonishing plants! There is clearly tremendous horticultural potential in Byblis. Do you use the same conditions for your B rorida as for your B filifolia and guehoi? Also, do you fertilise your plants or use a substrate containing some nutrients (as opposed to the standard nutrient-free CP substrate)?

Greg

#5 PofW_Feathers

 
PofW_Feathers
  • Full Members
  • 75 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the Far East
 

Posted 05 November 2010 - 12:30 PM

Dear Fernando-san,
Dear jimscott-san,

Konnichiwa!

Thank you very much! :sun_bespectacled:

Dear Greg-san,

Konnichiwa!

Please see reply #13:
http://icps.proboard...=...2348&page=1
and reply #17:
http://icps.proboard...=...2348&page=2

I grow all my tropical Byblis under the same condition.

You already know JohnnyBlaze-san's success.
http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=38315

He said that he had not used any fertilizer. I received an update photo from him on October 6. His plant (which he called purple petal) had exploded into flower! It was an absolutely fantastic plant!

You already saw:
http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=38180
JohnnyBlaze-san's said “ ...and expanded clay...”
I always use 'Kanumatsuchi' expanded clay, it is an orange-yellow ocher clay which you have already seen.
Post#2 http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=31457
The kanumatsuchi expanded clay is acid expanded volcanic gravel. JohnnyBlaze-san has used some kind of expanded clay that he was able to obtain in Switzerland. I have no other information and I do not know whether this product can be obtained in the U.K.
I use Canadian peat. JohnnyBlaze-san uses European peat.
I put a small amount of charcoal (made from rice seed husk) in the bottom in the pot. I do not know what he uses for the alternative.

JohnnyBlaze-san has achieved excellent plants with his soil mix by using materials that he was able to obtain in Europe.

He also reported.
in the same thread post #3…"Pots 15cm in diameter".
in the same thread post #5… "mini-Sauna".
I also recommend to give your plants "FULL SUNLIGHT".

JohnnyBlaze-san has offered a complete European specification soil recipe in the near future. So please wait until he posts his methods suitable for European growing conditions.

Kind regards

#6 PofW_Feathers

 
PofW_Feathers
  • Full Members
  • 75 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the Far East
 

Posted 05 November 2010 - 12:34 PM

Title: Polygenic inheritance

Konnichiwa!

I have often wondered if the unique flower character of DT14 was managed by polygenes. Now that I have gathered addition data on this line of inquiry I now sense that this character maybe managed by polygenes.

I think the flower size and the flower shape of Byblis are also possibly managed by polygenes. In my breeding program I have found it extremely difficult to fix the flower size of Byblis. I believe the reason for this is also controlled by polygenes.

I have become aware that the following characters of: lighter and darker colour shades of the flowers; the flower shape; and flower size appear to be managed by polygenes. In my breeding trials I have seen these characters exhibiting random traits not systematic traits.

Kind regards