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Mulching the bog over winter??


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#1 mattynatureboy44

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 00:59 AM

Hi,

Does anyone know where I can find some pine mulch or pine needles in the UK to put on my outside bog garden over winter I cant seem to find any anywhere, if not is there anything else I can use that anyone can recommend.

Also is it worth mulching the bog over winter?

#2 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:23 AM

Hey Matty I read in a University article to use straw as mulching material. It's cheap, plentiful, readily availble and excellent insulator. Heres the article..



http://www.life.illi...arnivorous.html




This is my material of choice, cause pine needles are hard to find in large amounts.


DexFC

#3 mobile

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:57 AM

Hey Matty I read in a University article to use straw as mulching material. It's cheap, plentiful, readily availble and excellent insulator. Heres the article..

http://www.life.illi...arnivorous.html

This is my material of choice, cause pine needles are hard to find in large amounts.

DexFC

Straw is a traditional mulching material. If you have a local park or managed woodland with pine trees then they might permit you to collect a few bags of needles when they start dropping. My local wooded park has areas that are several cm deep with pine needles in the autumn.

#4 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:06 AM

Cool advice....I might have to investgate that possible prospect.....thanks


DexFC

#5 billynomates666

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 13:02 PM

Hi Matty.

A lot depends on what you are growing in the bog and how large it is. The smaller it is the more protection it is going to need.

Generally Sarrs are good down to zone 7 or 8 but need protecting from the desiccant effect of the wind as it will both freeze and dry the rhizomes, which isnt good. I cover my more tender plants with fern fronds (only because they grow in my garden and are therefore easily obtained) which tend to work well as the plants still have air movement round them, essential for keeping the dreaded mould away.

Otherwise the straw and ground cover fleece sounds OK, apart from I would be concerned if the straw got wet, matted and started to rot.

Another way I have tried (with sarrs only) is to surround the bog with a 2 foot high 'windbreak' of the material used to put under ornemantal stones in the garden to prevent weeds coming through, held in place with canes, and a light sprinkling of forest bark about 1 inch deep. this lets light and rain in, but keeps the worst of the wind out. This seems to do the trick and is fairly cheap and easy to do.

Hope this helps
Steve

#6 dchasselblad74

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 14:04 PM

I have to try thay windbreak idea....its simple, but brilliant..thanks Steve..


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#7 Vic2

 
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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:09 AM

Hi,
Does anyone know where I can find some pine mulch or pine needles in the UK to put on my outside bog garden over winter I cant seem to find any anywhere, if not is there anything else I can use that anyone can recommend.
Also is it worth mulching the bog over winter?

I have a Phyllostachys bamboo next to my bog garden, and it sheds its small leaves over the bog garden in autumn - instant mulch!
It also keeps our pesky hen blackbird (appropriate Latin name: Turdus) from nicking my peat and small plants to line her nest in February :wub:

However, I have Pinguicula grandiflora in my bog, and its damn' near impossible to remove the leaves without losing the hibernaculae in the Spring.
I've also found that the hardy Drosera - filiformis v. filiformis, obovata, less so anglica but especially rotundifolia - hate being covered.

Anyone else see this?

Vic

#8 billynomates666

 
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Posted 05 October 2010 - 12:31 PM

Hi Vic

Now you come to mention it - Yes - I never put 2 and 2 together before, I have lost some native and hardy sundews in the past and on reflection it has always been those that have had some form of covering over them.

Thanks for opening my eyes, hopefully I will loose less plants thanks to that observation.

The Capensis and Binata on the other hand which aren't supposed to be hardy, grow back every year, covered or not, they are truely indestructable. Come the nuclear winter there will be cockroaches and capensis left to start the word anew.:wub:

Cheers
Steve