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Carnivorous Plant Society Blog no.2


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#1 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 28 September 2010 - 14:23 PM

Hi all

Next blog on the 'revolutionary' Air-pots.

CPS blog

Cheers

Tim

#2 Phil Green

 
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Posted 28 September 2010 - 17:11 PM

Hi Tim,

Other than height, how do these differ from the standard 'pond net' pots, which many people grow their Neps in ?

#3 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 28 September 2010 - 20:27 PM

Hi Tim,

Other than height, how do these differ from the standard 'pond net' pots, which many people grow their Neps in ?


Hi Phil

Probably easier if you view this link. In principle the Air-pot looks promising, but the proof is in the pudding.

Airpots

Will put the link in the blog.

Cheers

Tim

#4 Vic2

 
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Posted 29 September 2010 - 10:03 AM

Hi Tim,

Other than height, how do these differ from the standard 'pond net' pots, which many people grow their Neps in ?


Thanks for the heads-up, Tim;
Always worth hearing about these new developments :thumbsup:

From the photo and description, the wall of the pot is perforated and not flat, but formed into small cones.
This will significantly increase the surface area of the pot, and so encourage drying out.
Shouldn't be a problem for Nepenthes in 70+% humidity, and ideal for epiphytes.

Cynically, you could get a similar effect by putting plastic mesh 'pond-net' pots in a moderate oven for under a minute!! :roll:

Thrifty of Letchworth :wink:

P.S.
I wouldn't want to have to clean out Air-Pots...

Edited by Vic2, 29 September 2010 - 10:57 AM.


#5 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 29 September 2010 - 19:21 PM

Thanks for the heads-up, Tim;
Always worth hearing about these new developments :sick:

From the photo and description, the wall of the pot is perforated and not flat, but formed into small cones.
This will significantly increase the surface area of the pot, and so encourage drying out.
Shouldn't be a problem for Nepenthes in 70+% humidity, and ideal for epiphytes.

Cynically, you could get a similar effect by putting plastic mesh 'pond-net' pots in a moderate oven for under a minute!! :lol:

Thrifty of Letchworth :sick:

P.S.
I wouldn't want to have to clean out Air-Pots...


Air-pots are held together with a plastic screw. Take it out and it comes apart and lays flat, like unreeling the cardboard middle of a bog roll - simple but clever. And that makes it a bit easier to clean.

Not sure about drying out, like you say, but you have to be in to find these things out. :biggrin:

#6 Vic2

 
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Posted 29 September 2010 - 21:30 PM

Air-pots are held together with a plastic screw. Take it out and it comes apart and lays flat, like unreeling the cardboard middle of a bog roll - simple but clever. And that makes it a bit easier to clean.

Not sure about drying out, like you say, but you have to be in to find these things out. :devious:

I was wondering how they moulded the pots...!

I think they might be a bit too quick-drying for terrestrials like Sarracenia, but they might make a good way of showing off the traps of Genlisea and Utricularia, if you immerse the pots in a clear tank.

I'll look forward to reading your findings, Tim. :yes:

Vic

P.S.
'Air-pruning' sounds like a euphemism for 'dried-out roots',
but I guess the marketeer had to find some way of turning a negative feature into a positive benefit... :wink:

#7 mobile

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 06:45 AM

Hi Tim,

I'll be interested in seeing you hydroponics setups at EEE 2011. I have dabbled with hydroponics myself and if you have not already discovered it, I have a post here: http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=31887

#8 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 16:58 PM

Hi Tim,

I'll be interested in seeing you hydroponics setups at EEE 2011. I have dabbled with hydroponics myself and if you have not already discovered it, I have a post here: http://www.cpukforum...showtopic=31887


Excellent, not sure if you have seen my deep water bubble system which I've had on the go for a couple of years and publicised in the CPS Newsletter. My VFT is kept in a netted pot filled with gravel in a gold fish type glass bowl. The rhizome sits just above the water line. I keep it running 24/7 and have had great results. Like you it's in a clear vessel, which I cover with tin foil. It will fur up after a while - bit like changing a fish bowl.

I'm setting up a flood and flow/deep water bubble type system. Basically creating a constant flowing water table across a modified flood and drain tray and reservoir. I blocked the original outlet which is next to the inlet and drilled a new outlet at the other end of the tray. This allows the water to flow across the unit before draining back into the reservoir. In the reservoir I have a powerful air stone to increase O2 levels. In the growing season I have the option of adding an old lemonade bottle which has been filled with water and frozen over night. This will help keep the water temperature down and increase the O2 level too. Will try this with Darlingtonia, VFT and S. purpurea. All going well this will be at the EEE too. This looks like the best way to do what we are both doing, but on a large scale. I intend to use a medium of expanded clay and live sphagnum moss - the sphagnum will help keep a good pH. I will post a blog on this in a few weeks.

Good luck and will be good to cross notes. Hydroponics may not grow cps any better in all cases, but it is great fun!

Tim

Edited by Tim Bailey, 30 September 2010 - 16:58 PM.


#9 mobile

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 17:09 PM

I tried a Cephalotus in a bubbler too, there is a post on here showing it. Unfortunately though, the reservoir wasn't light tight and the whole setup was overwhelmed with algae. I would like to try another Cephalotus in the future. I would also like to try a Heliamphora but don't have any expendable spares... donations accepted in the name of experimentation :sweat: Looking at pictures of certain Heliamphora in habitat, it would appear that they like high water levels so might suit a bubbler.

#10 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 17:09 PM

I was wondering how they moulded the pots...!

I think they might be a bit too quick-drying for terrestrials like Sarracenia, but they might make a good way of showing off the traps of Genlisea and Utricularia, if you immerse the pots in a clear tank.

I'll look forward to reading your findings, Tim. :yes:

Vic

P.S.
'Air-pruning' sounds like a euphemism for 'dried-out roots',
but I guess the marketeer had to find some way of turning a negative feature into a positive benefit... :wink:


The Sarracenia will stand in water in the normal way, which does negate some of the benefit of the Air-pot which are also design to allow air to enter through a grid at the bottom of the pot to get the maximum results. If kept as designed then the only problem is if you can't water the plant at the frequency needed. All will be revealed over time as I experiment - the good, the bad and the ugly. :sweat:

#11 mobile

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 17:22 PM

... but they might make a good way of showing off the traps of Genlisea and Utricularia, if you immerse the pots in a clear tank.

I use heavy duty net pots for this purpose.

Edited by mobile, 30 September 2010 - 17:25 PM.


#12 Vic2

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 19:05 PM

I use heavy duty net pots for this purpose.

Thanks for the link, mobile. :sweat:

Where did you buy your Air-Pots, Tim?

Vic

#13 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 20:11 PM

Thanks for the link, mobile. :sweat:

Where did you buy your Air-Pots, Tim?

Vic



Progrow, down the road from where I work - excellent bunch of dudes.

Progrow

#14 Vic2

 
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Posted 30 September 2010 - 21:47 PM

Progrow, down the road from where I work - excellent bunch of dudes.

Thanks, Tim.

Er...

By "dudes", d'you mean they're a bunch of cowboy novices?

I don't think they'd be too pleased at your candour, Timbo... :wink:


Ever-Tactful-and-Discreet of Letchworth :sweat:

Edited by Vic2, 01 October 2010 - 08:55 AM.


#15 Tim Bailey

 
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Posted 01 October 2010 - 15:22 PM

Thanks, Tim.

Er...

By "dudes", d'you mean they're a bunch of cowboy novices?

I don't think they'd be too pleased at your candour, Timbo... :tu:


Ever-Tactful-and-Discreet of Letchworth :whistling:


Where do you get your definition from Vic-my-boy. Dude clearly means 'fellows' here and not the other definition of dude 'a bloke concerned about his dress and appearance,' e.g. a dandy. Never heard the word used to describe a bunch of cowboy novices before. Better tell the Hairy Bikers as they call each other dude all the time.

Scratching-my-head-its-now-sore of Wellington

#16 Vic2

 
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Posted 01 October 2010 - 17:13 PM

Where do you get your definition from Vic-my-boy. Dude clearly means 'fellows' here and not the other definition of dude 'a bloke concerned about his dress and appearance,' e.g. a dandy. Never heard the word used to describe a bunch of cowboy novices before. Better tell the Hairy Bikers as they call each other dude all the time.

Scratching-my-head-its-now-sore of Wellington


I'm surprised, Timbo: Google 'dude ranch', or ask an American, for a third definition.
(I didn't know a dude could be a dandy, btw).

Y'know, I've never thought of you as a Hairy Biker fan, with genuine Wehrmacht helmet, cowhorns, studded leather jacket, tattooed knuckles and throaty Harley-Davidson...
Is that what you use for your getaway, after you call 'em "dudes" at Progrow? :biggrin:

GD&R of Letchworth :biggrin:

#17 Vic2

 
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Posted 04 October 2010 - 11:01 AM

Speaking of dudes, I've remembered a suitably non-PC joke about them. :biggrin:

For those willing to risk it, the joke can be found here:

Enjoy!

Vic