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Pond bog


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#1 Guest_Scorpio_*

 
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Posted 09 September 2010 - 17:46 PM

i have a small bog on the edge of my pond. the plants are growing in moss which i collected from a hillside in wales. the pitchers are both doing really well, the fly traps aren't so good but i have only just removed the stuff that had grown over them and i had let them flower so there are only a few traps. the sundew has only just gone in so i will see how it goes.
i will be extending it to the whole of that side of the pond next year and use whatever species of plant survive the winter.
for winter, to improve their chances of survival what should i do? i was thinking when they have been dieing back for a month i will put a thick layer of moss on top so that the frosts dont get them. good idea?
anyway, pics:
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#2 mantrid

 
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Posted 09 September 2010 - 18:21 PM

i have a small bog on the edge of my pond. the plants are growing in moss which i collected from a hillside in wales. the pitchers are both doing really well, the fly traps aren't so good but i have only just removed the stuff that had grown over them and i had let them flower so there are only a few traps. the sundew has only just gone in so i will see how it goes.
i will be extending it to the whole of that side of the pond next year and use whatever species of plant survive the winter.
for winter, to improve their chances of survival what should i do? i was thinking when they have been dieing back for a month i will put a thick layer of moss on top so that the frosts dont get them. good idea?
anyway, pics:



I would start by pulling out the grass. That type of grass is a nightmare once it gets a foot hold. It sends out runners that sprouts more grass and the roots are tough and deep. I would also get some sphagnum moss growing around the CPs

Edited by mantrid, 09 September 2010 - 18:23 PM.


#3 billynomates666

 
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Posted 13 September 2010 - 13:04 PM

Hi Scorpio

I grow a my CPs generally outdoors, and just tend to cover the more tender ones, such as fly traps and non native sundews with fern fronds, as they dry out quickly after rain and air can pass through them for ventilation. Pine needles are also a favourite and add acidity to the bog. I haven't tried sphagnum but would immagine that the constant high moisture content that the moss will have when not frozen, could rot the plants when laid over them, given a couple of months of cold and damp with little ventilation.

Most if not all Sarracenias are hardy to about zone 8 or 9, so if they are healthy going into dormancy, will make it through, so long as they not in pots or small bog areas that will freeze solid (but you can cover them anyway to be on the safe side), fly traps also are Ok if they are kept reasonably dry through the cold spell (planted on mounds generally helps). Capensis and Binata always die but come back from the roots given a modicome of protection.

Its the desiccating effect of wind, which I find causes the most damage, the pitchers and traps tend to dry and die, which is unsightly but isnt a problem so long as the rhizome is OK. So keep the direct effect of the wind off the rhizome to keep the wind chill factor down.

So all in all they should be good through the winter given a small amount of protection, although I would take advice on the suitability of sphagnum for this purpose. If you find out can you let me know please?

Cheers and good luck with the extension next year
Steve

Edited by billynomates666, 13 September 2010 - 13:29 PM.


#4 Guest_Scorpio_*

 
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Posted 22 September 2010 - 18:26 PM

i will experiment with it and see what happens. one of the pitchers has completely surprised me with its size. when i bought it it was only about 6cm wide and had about 10 pitchers, its now at least a foot in diameter and must have well over 30 big pitchers on it. i will be shocked if it doesnt come back.
the water in the pond is PH6.5 - 7.5 depending on the weather and stuff, so it is alright for them. im being cautious about what i put in there because of the fish. i was thinking of covering the bog bit with filter wool (stuff i put in my filter to remove dirt and stuff). it might keep the frost off and help the flytraps survive.
the plant which is behind the CP's in those pictures (with the little bristly leaves) is a real pest and covers the whole pond and weighs a ton if we dont keep trimming it. however, there should be one more trim this year (probably remove about 20kg of it, about 2' x 3' chunk) so i might just dump some of that on top of them, it looks like pine needles :D

#5 billynomates666

 
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Posted 24 September 2010 - 12:34 PM

Hi Scorpio
Sounds like a plan! The only possible problem you may have if the pond overflows into the bog, is the 'fertilising' effect of the fish manure, rotting vegetation and the total disolved solids contained in the water. You will notice any adverse effects though, as the pitchers will get deformend and look decidedly 'iffy'.
Having said that, by the sounds of it they are loving the environment so it must all be good.

Cheers
Steve