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Can compost be used for ANY Carnivorous plant?


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#1 Carnivorous-Owen

 
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Posted 21 July 2010 - 19:48 PM

- I'm told many of times that normal compost cannot be used for carnivorous plants however in the CPS book i got earlier this year it was on about planting Sarracenia in "compost" just wondering could this be done by normal compost? if not, what mix shall i do?

- Whats there difference between sphagnum moss and sphagnum peat?
- What types of fertalizers can you use on Carnivorous plants? Except for Giberellic Acid i dont know any?
- What do the following words mean
1. Propogation
2. Cultivation

I think thats about it for now if i think of any more questions i will add.
Thanks Guys
Owen

#2 James O'Neill

 
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Posted 21 July 2010 - 20:19 PM

1. propagation means to make more plants from what you have - i.e. fertilising flowers and getting seed, dividing roots, leaf cuttings etc.
2. Cultivation....to keep a plant in 'captivity' - the plant is not in the wild, but you are growing it...if you know what I mean.

I would recommend you don't plant Sarracenia in normal compost. You'd find it dead in a week. The book probably means Peat compost.
Giberellic acid, as far as I know, is not a compost, but a germination stimulator. Generally recmmended not to fertilize CPs - though Nepenthes likes a dose of coffee every 6 months.
Sphagnum Moss is living moss - normally found in bogs. Very good water holder, and it is like a sponge of the plant world. Sphagnum peat is sphagnum moss that has died and compacted together.

#3 LoopyLee

 
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Posted 21 July 2010 - 21:55 PM

When I first started out a year ago I asked the person I bought some of my first plants from what I should do if I couldn't find peat compost, as I couldn't find anywhere in my area selling it.. He advised me to buy the cheapest compost from somewhere like Wilkinsons (without any fertilisers added) and make a mix up with sand/pearlite/moss and use that.. So I did, and my plants not only survived but thrived over the course of the year..

#4 Hayden

 
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Posted 21 July 2010 - 22:02 PM

I bought my peat in a massive green and purple bag for just £3.50. It can be found in any nursery that sell cp's.

#5 Hayden

 
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Posted 21 July 2010 - 22:02 PM

I bought my peat in a massive green and purple bag for just £3.50. It can be found in any nursery that sell cp's.

#6 Amori

 
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Posted 22 July 2010 - 00:12 AM

I grew my first ever Drosophyllum from seed in a mix of 12 parts perlite, 7 parts vermiculite, and 7 parts John Innes 2 in a long tomato pot - worked absolute wonders.

#7 diva

 
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Posted 22 July 2010 - 08:01 AM

I grew my first ever Drosophyllum from seed in a mix of 12 parts perlite, 7 parts vermiculite, and 7 parts John Innes 2 in a long tomato pot - worked absolute wonders.

yes if i have any i always add a lil JI to drosophylum mix's but its not exactly a 'normal' CP is it? i'd like to see your results if you added it to a sarra mix.