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When do they start growing again in UK?


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#1 TroJon

 
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Posted 11 May 2010 - 13:42 PM

I bought a darlingtonia some weeks ago, meant to be quite a large plant, like XXL?

Thing is, all my other plants have started growing, the cephs first (which are outside and traditionally the later starters for me) and the VFTs have started sending out new traps just last week or so (quite late as well?!) - am just wondering is this darlingtonia ok?

When do they normally start growing in the UK- it's been a while since I had one (about 5 years!) so I don't really remember!

Is it possible after a few weeks of owning this plant, it's still in a bit of shock from the post etc?

#2 DaveC

 
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Posted 11 May 2010 - 15:00 PM

The ones I keep in the greenhouse started again about 3 weeks ago and the ones in my bog gardens started about a week after them but the growth on all of them is tiny just now. My largest one (in a bog garden) put up a flower about 3 weeks ago - just before the traps started.

If there's no movement at all then it might be worth unpotting it and having a look at the roots. I did this when I noticed one of mine not moving and found that almost all of the roots had been chewed off by some kind of larva. Both the plant and bug are now dead.

#3 Amar

 
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Posted 11 May 2010 - 15:56 PM

I doubt the bugs demise was due to indigestion..?

#4 LoopyLee

 
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Posted 11 May 2010 - 16:19 PM

I doubt the bugs demise was due to indigestion..?

I very much doubt it too..

#5 BLUENOWZ1878

 
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Posted 23 May 2010 - 16:40 PM

I have two plants both in exactly the same growing conditions one of which is growing normally, I think the other one seems to me to be drying out!.
any ideas?
Thanks in Advance ...........Jim
p.s. While I'm here why do I need a different password for CPS

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#6 DaveC

 
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Posted 23 May 2010 - 19:42 PM

As I said, dig it up and have a look at the roots.

If its drying out then that would mean that it is losing more water than its absorbing which points towards a problem with the roots.

#7 BLUENOWZ1878

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 00:22 AM

Thanks for that Dave ,will check it tomorrow...........Jim

#8 alexa

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 05:03 AM

In reply to Trojon, I have a Darlingtonia that has been outdoors all year and has only really just started coming back to life, it's sent up some flowers, but they remain small, on short stems. Don't worry, it will be fine, as long as the traps are still green.

Alex.

#9 diva

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 08:15 AM

dont know about in a greenhouse but my darli's outside are just flowering now and pitchers are maybe 4" a bit late this year but i wouldn't worry.

#10 loligo1964

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 09:44 AM

I live but a few hours from the native range and it's even been terribly slow this Spring in Northern California -- an opinion also echoed by those at Peter D'Amato's nursery, California Carnivores. My plants have just become active within the last few weeks and I have yet to see a flower in 2010; otherwise, they've produced them like clockwork for the last decade . . .

#11 BLUENOWZ1878

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 13:50 PM

I am just about to repot this plant should I use the compost it came in again or change it ?
Posted Image
Plant root washed
Posted Image
Different angle
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Piece that broke off
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Close up of same piece
Posted Image
Original Compost
At the moment plant is sitting in water tray!

Edited by BLUENOWZ1878, 24 May 2010 - 13:52 PM.


#12 LJ

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 14:06 PM

BLUENOW - Personally if I unpot something to check the roots because the plant isnt looking to healthy I always use fresh peat and thoroughly wash the pot too just incase. I'd also wash the water tray too, the water looks a bit brown so due a clean out anyway.......

If it is a root rot problem then keeping the plant sopping wet is only likely to make the problem worse (although if it is rot then often the plant dies or atleast it does in my case), looks like you have some nice fresh roots but the plant isnt looking too healthy at the side of the other one - I'd seperate it from the other one, and water it in well and then try and keep it on the drier side but dont let it dry out completely. It will then be a case of just wait and see - hopefully it will be fine and start to perk up soon.

As for the comment about the CPS - its a seperate site so yes you do need seperate details for there. Presuming you have joined the CPS?

#13 BLUENOWZ1878

 
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Posted 24 May 2010 - 14:41 PM

Thanks for the advice LJ,off to repot now!

#14 TroJon

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 03:27 AM

Thanks for the re-assurances guys!

My plant has sprogged up some tiny red traps at the base, been away for a couple of weeks but hopefully they aren't dry and toast now from the heat spell :/

#15 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 11:03 AM

Darlingtonia quite like a bit of perlite in the compost, then a cap of live Sphagnum

#16 TroJon

 
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Posted 28 June 2010 - 01:41 AM

Does anyone know when the largest traps for that season come up- relative to when the plant starts growing? I.e. is it the first growth of the season that leads to the biggest pitchers, or does it take some time? Does anyone have darlingtonia development pics, as the one I have now has opened its hood on a trap about 8" or so, and the forked tongue is coming out. But the dead/dry pitchers are about 20" or so tall, so this one maybe stunted or still grows even when open?

#17 ada

 
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Posted 28 June 2010 - 18:37 PM

The largest pitcher is usually the very first one of the season.