Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Dracunculus vulgaris


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Loakesy

 
Loakesy
  • Full Members
  • 3,462 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South East London
  • Interests:Carnivorous Plants, Family History, Photography, Forensic Science
 

Posted 27 March 2010 - 19:19 PM

My D. vulgaris did absolutely nothing last year, and last time I looked, the corm was a brown, slushy mush, so I didn't bother doing anything with it. It's been left out in the damp and cold all winter.

Then this happened:
Posted Image

I think I counted 6 shoots.

Hopefully I'm going to have a couple of stinky flowers this year!

#2 AndrewLuton

 
AndrewLuton
  • Full Members
  • 195 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harlington, Bedfordshire
  • Interests:CP's, PC games, Radio, Man Utd, Geocaching
 

Posted 29 June 2010 - 15:58 PM

Hi Andy- have they flowered yet? I had a huge flower open while I was away 2 weeks ago so just missed the stink. :pleasantry:

#3 Loakesy

 
Loakesy
  • Full Members
  • 3,462 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South East London
  • Interests:Carnivorous Plants, Family History, Photography, Forensic Science
 

Posted 29 June 2010 - 18:26 PM

Nope. Just foliage this year so far!

But you can see what happened a couple of years back here: http://www.cpukforum...;hl=dracunculus

Edited by Loakesy, 29 June 2010 - 18:31 PM.


#4 AndrewLuton

 
AndrewLuton
  • Full Members
  • 195 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harlington, Bedfordshire
  • Interests:CP's, PC games, Radio, Man Utd, Geocaching
 

Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:13 PM

Mine produced a large flower about 3 weeks ago and as soon as it wilted and died the stems of the plants are all wilting and dying back now. Is this normal after flowering?

#5 gardenofeden

 
gardenofeden
  • Full Members
  • 4,697 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:York, England
 

Posted 14 July 2010 - 14:47 PM

yes, mine are dying back too, normal (esp in hot weather)

#6 AndrewLuton

 
AndrewLuton
  • Full Members
  • 195 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harlington, Bedfordshire
  • Interests:CP's, PC games, Radio, Man Utd, Geocaching
 

Posted 14 July 2010 - 15:01 PM

Cheers for that advice. I will have to cut them back then and forget about them until next year :suicide_fool-edit:

#7 Rob-Rah

 
Rob-Rah
  • Full Members
  • 752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW London/Surrey, UK
 

Posted 14 July 2010 - 19:17 PM

Don't cut the stems back until completely shrivelled (they wil then pull away with no effort at all). They continue to pump starch into the new bulb for as long as they can ;-)

#8 AndrewLuton

 
AndrewLuton
  • Full Members
  • 195 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harlington, Bedfordshire
  • Interests:CP's, PC games, Radio, Man Utd, Geocaching
 

Posted 14 July 2010 - 19:54 PM

Ok will do- I will wait till they rot off naturally.