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Catopsis ID


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#1 piscesilim

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 07:18 AM

Is it C. beteroniana?

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#2 An D Smith

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:34 AM

Hi Lim


Yes, that is definately Catopsis berteroniana.



Cheers
Andy

#3 piscesilim

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 12:36 PM

Hi Lim


Yes, that is definately Catopsis berteroniana.



Cheers
Andy


May I know what is the main characteristic of C. berteroniana? Check through this website. Some Catopsis species are quite similar.
http://fcbs.org/pictures/Catopsis.htm

Edited by piscesilim, 11 June 2009 - 12:38 PM.


#4 Steve Stewart

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 12:26 PM

Hello,

I do not think you have a Catopsis berteroniana. It looks like the petals of the flowers are longer than the sepals of your very well grown plant. In Catopsis berteroniana the sepals are longer than the petals.

I agree that many Catopsis species look very similar. I have grown many C. berteroniana and they are more powdery than the plant you show.

I have posted photographs in the past, on this forum, of one of the C. berteroniana plants I have grown, and it's seedlings. Unfortunately I did not take high quality photographs of the flowers close up. (they are not showy)

An exact description from the state of Florida, where C. berteroniana is listed as endangered.

" Catopsis berteroniana (J.A. and J.H. Schultes) Mez. epiphyte; rosettes to 7 dm tall; lvs yellowish green, white powdery covering; scape stout, erect, with 15-50 flrs; petals white, shorter than sepals; anthers open daytime; seeds sprout on capsule; tidal swamp, rockland hammocks; (Collier), Dade and Monroe [not keys] cos; all year."

I am now growing another species of Catopsis that I believe is C. floribunda, and it has more powder on it's leaves than your plant.

Do not think less of your plant, it may well be a very rare species! It does not look exactly like any of the photographs in the link you provided. I have never read any information about possible hybrids in the genus Catopsis. A keen eye for taxonomic characteristics may prove valuable for the future of this genus!

Take care,
Steven Stewart
Florida, USA

Edited by Steve Stewart, 14 June 2009 - 12:42 PM.


#5 piscesilim

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 14:07 PM

Hello,

I do not think you have a Catopsis berteroniana. It looks like the petals of the flowers are longer than the sepals of your very well grown plant. In Catopsis berteroniana the sepals are longer than the petals.

I agree that many Catopsis species look very similar. I have grown many C. berteroniana and they are more powdery than the plant you show.

I have posted photographs in the past, on this forum, of one of the C. berteroniana plants I have grown, and it's seedlings. Unfortunately I did not take high quality photographs of the flowers close up. (they are not showy)

An exact description from the state of Florida, where C. berteroniana is listed as endangered.

" Catopsis berteroniana (J.A. and J.H. Schultes) Mez. epiphyte; rosettes to 7 dm tall; lvs yellowish green, white powdery covering; scape stout, erect, with 15-50 flrs; petals white, shorter than sepals; anthers open daytime; seeds sprout on capsule; tidal swamp, rockland hammocks; (Collier), Dade and Monroe [not keys] cos; all year."

I am now growing another species of Catopsis that I believe is C. floribunda, and it has more powder on it's leaves than your plant.

Do not think less of your plant, it may well be a very rare species! It does not look exactly like any of the photographs in the link you provided. I have never read any information about possible hybrids in the genus Catopsis. A keen eye for taxonomic characteristics may prove valuable for the future of this genus!

Take care,
Steven Stewart
Florida, USA


Thanks. Steven.
How can I know the petals are longer than the sepals? Should I dissect the flower to measure?

#6 Steve Stewart

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 19:44 PM

Lim,

It would be (always is) best to dissect a few flowers for conclusive identification. On my plants of Catopsis berteroninana the flowers petals were hidden by the sepals when they were open, but I did dissect a few for measurements, as I was taking a field botany course at the time, and was being certain about the ID. I have seen many photographs of Catopsis species flowering that were supposed to be C. berteroniana, but were either hybrids or some other species.

Take care,
Steven Stewart
Florida, USA

#7 Phil Green

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 21:45 PM

I've got no idea, but the pic in that link shows the petals of Catopsis berteroninana as longer than the sepals.

#8 Steve Stewart

 
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Posted 15 June 2009 - 11:17 AM

I've got no idea, but the pic in that link shows the petals of Catopsis berteroninana as longer than the sepals.


I noticed that as well.

Take care,
Steven Stewart
Florida, USA