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Load of casualties!


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#61 sandy pandy

 
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Posted 16 October 2009 - 22:33 PM

Yes, they are all still in the westlands. I did email about the Moorland gold but its going to cost me around £130 for 15 bags, shame the delivery is so expensive. The larger plants are so far doing ok, they were planted using a different bag of westlands that seemed better quality than the one i had opened for my newer plants. I suppose its worth paying the £130 or risk losing my collection of plants. Yet my Cephs have gone wild this year, they are potted in the stuff!!! The VFTs dont like this westlands rubbish.

#62 mobile

 
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Posted 16 October 2009 - 22:42 PM

VFT do seem to be particularly sensitive to peat quality. I lost numerous of them to bad peat but my Cephalotus has been planted in the same peat, from the same bag, and it is thriving.

#63 sandy pandy

 
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Posted 16 October 2009 - 23:02 PM

Goes to show the Cephs are tough little plants. :cray: I will just have to get some money together and order the Moorland gold, i would be devastated if i lost all my VFTs. Most of my giants have grown really well this year, especially the B52's, would be a real shame if i lost them now. :(

#64 Trev

 
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Posted 17 October 2009 - 18:08 PM

It would be interesting to see a good detailed analysis of the soil from Dionaea's natural habitat. I read an account somewhere that mention a high percentage of sand, pine needles and charcoal in it but I cant find it now. the only one I can find now is from here: http://jxb.oxfordjou...ull/52/358/1041

KCl-extractable soil ammonium concentrations were low at all three sites (site I: 0.08 µmol g-1 DW±0.045 sd, site II: 0.14 µmol g-1 DW±0.048 sd, site III: 0.06 µmol g-1 DW± 0.017 sd), nitrate could not be detected. Differences between sites were not significant (P>0.05) indicating that in all three sites the investigation was not affected by the short-term mineralization effects of fire. The low fertility of the coastal sands of North Carolina in the Dionaea habitat is characterized by a lack of calcium, manganese, and nitrate and low levels of ammonia, iron, magnesium, and phosphate in recently burnt soils (Roberts and Oostings, 1958Go)


I know Irish peat is high in Iron and Manganese.

Trev.

#65 flycatchers

 
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Posted 01 July 2010 - 19:39 PM

Still getting loads of VFTs with light brown soft rotten bases!! This started in Aug 2008 and has only slightly let up in the winter. This current heatwave has really accelerated the problem. Although Westlands peat is often blamed I have only ever used Shamrock Irish Moss peat which is the only one available here. And till 2008 was very happy. Since them I have used several different batches brought in 2008 and 2009 and repotted many plants. The plants carry on looking stressed and them carry on rotting. Though in March/April my plants on the whole were looking good. Will repot more in Sphagnum moss and see how that works out. And try some Moorland gold. Has the changed to Moorland solved the problem for other growers with this issue?

Annoyed & Stressed!!

bill

#66 Peabody

 
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Posted 01 July 2010 - 21:55 PM

There is lots of Iron in Moorland Gold as well.

#67 Ronnie..

 
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Posted 01 July 2010 - 22:45 PM

Has anyone tried clover brand of sphagnum peat moss?
My garden centre just started stocking it so i bought a few bags.
Prior to that i was buying moorland gold for £15 a time.
This clover stuff is only £4.99 for a 85 litre bag.

so, i hope it's safe!

#68 Alexis

 
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Posted 02 July 2010 - 09:05 AM

I have only ever used Shamrock Irish Moss peat which is the only one available here


Mike had a bad batch of Shamrock a couple of years ago. It seems no brand is 'immune' because of where it's dug out of the bog.

#69 mobile

 
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Posted 02 July 2010 - 09:44 AM

I think this situation will only become worse. Many bogs are classified as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). This means that peat is likely coming from existing extraction sites, so I guess that there is a chance that the processing companies may be resorting to extracting the less than ideal peat, which is good enough for gardens, but not for picky CPs. This is just a theory though. As I have mentioned before, I think that further research into alternatives is required but very little of this is being done, as far as I can see. Total reliance on Moorland Gold is not advisable either, as it is from a single company and there is no guarantees that any company continue trading - that's not to say that they won't, and I wish them all the luck in the future, but don't put all your eggs in one basket.

#70 Hayden

 
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Posted 02 July 2010 - 12:57 PM

Sorry to hear about the death of you plants. I want to buy a greenhouse soon, so I better buy one with a few bits of glass missing! Its a much cheaper way of getting one, and it saves the plants life.

For dormancy im either going to leave it in my north facing porch or still on my window sill. But in masses I dont see how a greenhouse could be a problem, maybe I should just put a couple of blankets up in the roof.

#71 LJ

 
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Posted 02 July 2010 - 18:58 PM

Hayden - being in a greenhpuse over winter or summer doesnt normally cause any issues for vfts, having bits of glass missing wont save plants - the heat at the moment has probably made any exisiting problems worse for Bill. Alos, you need to keep your vfts somewhere cold over winter - a windowsill wont be cold enough, a greenhouse is the ideal place. Just the same as it is in summer, keep it well ventilated - vents and auctomatic roof vents are a good idea and leave the door open.....

I'm still going through losses too Bill, lost another 2 big cephs recently - they were potted up in the old peat but its the same problems I was having before :whistle3: More mushy vft bulbs too but mostly over winter, I should have repotted everything much earlier which I think would have helped but didnt have time with the wedding.

I finally managed to get some new peat - Clover - it looks much better and not as dark as the westlsnd I was using but the pots are quickly covered in green slime, dont think its doing any harm but its looks yucky! I'm tending to grow more and more cephs just in pure live moss, I keep new and rarer vfts in moss too.

Have you been trying to keep our plants on the drier side? Did you try a higher percentage of perlite? Let us know how you get on with the moss and moorland gold. I definitely think moss is a good option, just more of a pain in winter and harder to keep at a certain level of moisture I think, it can try out so quickly. - lost a few plants that way too!

Do you think we're cursed?? :pleasantry:

#72 Davion

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 16:38 PM

OK ... as-R-'RELIC' Who's-Been IN-The-Game, so-to-speak, for 38-Years Now My-Suggestion to-You ALL Would-be to-AVOID Peat Like-The-Plague. It's-R-Bit-of-R-Con Really ... 'Hides'-R-Multitude-of-Sins from-R Commercial StandPoint or Point-of-View:

Awe-WoW ... This-Peats Got-R pH of 3 (Really-Acid) Devoid-of-Nutrients &-Yet 'Me'-Garden-Plants R-Sending Roots-INTO-It as-If They're Discovering The-Elixir-of-DEEP-Subterranean-Life:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

>(*~*)< / >(*U^)<

If-You're 'Lucky'-enough to Get-Your-Hands ON-Some Flytraps When-They 'Arrive' ON-The-Day to-R-Garden-Centre &-'Rush'-Home or or Do-R-'Test' IN-The-Car-Park so-to-Speak ... You-May-even Get-R-pH Closer to 2.5!!! >(*~*)< AWEL ... Could-They Be 'Finishing'-OFF The-Flytraps with Ammonium-sulphate!!!??? >(*~*)< Will-Give The-Plants R-'Nice' Perky-Green Palour / Acid-enough to put-to-Sleep or-Even Kill-OFF Any ACID-Tolerant Rhizobia Living-In The Roots & The Leaf-Bases of The-Plants ... So When-You Transfer-Them to-Your Potting-Mix It'll-Take At-Least Another Season (Year-'Wasted') to-get-Them 'Bach' so-to-speak ... if-at-All. >(*~*)< / >(*U^)<

R-But 'Thart's Because They-Source &-BLEND The-'Finest'-Peats from R-Round The-World!!! >(*U^)< R-Bit-Similar to The DECOY / Cover-Story Regarding TANNIC-Teas, Really ... Which Is Most-likely 'Just' The-Use of CHEAP Photographic-Grade Potassium-FERRICYANIDE!!! >(*~*)< / >(*U^)<

****

http://www.flytrapca...otos-t8409.html

OK ... Have-R-'Look' at These TWO-Sets of-Photographs by-BRAD from FLYTRAPCARE of Dionaea Growing IN-The-Wild, so-to-Speak, ... IN-(September)-2009.

Are Any-of-Them 'Growing' IN-Peat??? R-Any-of-Them 'Growing' IN-Spagnum ... "I"-'Mean' DEEP-Sphagnum 'Not'-Just 'Surface' Clusters Here-&-There!!!???

Now What-We've Been Able to-Determine from BRAD's Images R the following:

(1) None-of-Them Appear to-be 'Affected' by Flowering!!!

(2) There's an 'Aquatic' Waterlilly / Nymphaea-Lotus-like Associate growing With Most Plants In-The-Wild (Other Internet Images Support-This). These R-'Known' to-Harbour Nitrogen-'Fixing' ACID-Tolerant Rhizobia (Actually Some-of The most Acid-Tolerant so-Far 'Known').

(3) There-R-WORM-Castings IN Some-of-The-Photographs ... Suggesting that-There R-Actually Appreciable Amounts of CALCIUM IN-The-Soil to-Support-These.

There-R-Probably OTHER-Points to-be 'Discovered' from-These Photographs ... it-You 'Look' HARD-enough ("I"-ONLY 'Discovered The-Enlargement-toold On-The-Site After Two-Months of Looking!!! >(*~*)<) ... Don't-Let ME 'Stop'-You!!! >(*~*)< / >(*U^)<

Oh ... &-Above-ALL ... ENJOY!!! >(*U^)< MERRY-CHRISTMAS!!!

#73 Davion

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 18:03 PM

http://www.springerl...lh16471v18lq10/ >(*U^)<

#74 Alexis

 
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Posted 24 March 2011 - 19:11 PM

I think people tend to grow in peat because it has always been historically easier to source and available in large quantities cheaply.

You could grow in pure silica sand I suppose, amongst other options. The question is, just because it grows in substrate A in the wild, is that necessarily the only option and the best option? Unless you live in North Carolina, your own climate will skew any research in all probabilty.

Most people also grow in pots not subjected to overhead watering, so there may be a dilution effect of anything in the soil.

As for flowering, how does it actually 'affect' the plants? Is it a case of the plant producing fewer traps afterwards, or smaller traps? Or does it take a break from trap production of a couple of weeks?

Does natural selection weed out the weaker plants in the wild, leaving the healthiest specimens, whereas people cultivate plants of a weaker disposition?

So many questions!!

#75 Davion

 
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Posted 13 April 2011 - 18:36 PM

Another FIVE-Years &-Those CRESCO-Photos IN-CPN Will-Be 30-Years Old ... 'Time' for-R REDUX??? >(*U^)<