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Stapelia hirsuta


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#1 Tim A

 
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Posted 26 August 2008 - 20:54 PM

My Stapelia has flowered for the first time :tu:

Yesterday
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Today
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Didn't notice any smell, but there are lots of fly eggs in the centre.

#2 D_muscipula

 
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Posted 26 August 2008 - 21:47 PM

Wow that is a huge flower, can you give me advice on growing it, I have a stapelia hirsuta cutting that I rooted its established and making its first flower for me. But I don't know what it likes and doesn't like as its my only non carnivorous plant.

#3 Tim A

 
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Posted 26 August 2008 - 22:58 PM

I have it in a greenhouse where it gets full sun until midday, I water it about once every 3 to 4 weeks at the moment. Our weather tends to be cloudy though, so you may need more shade. I keep it indoors and dry through the winter.

#4 D_muscipula

 
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Posted 27 August 2008 - 05:58 AM

Do they like heat, need cool nights, how about hardiness?
I litterally know nothing about how to grow stapelia and I have never grown any cacti.

#5 Tim A

 
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Posted 27 August 2008 - 22:42 PM

It is quite tolerant of different conditions, the main thing is not to water it too much and keep it above 50 F.

#6 pwilson

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:07 AM

Agreed with the cultivation tips. Also most Stapeliads are tolerant of a wide range of temperatures including below zero conditions. This is quite surprising since the recieved wisdom is that most succulents need heat in the winter. I keep quite a few of my succulents in an unheated greenhouse and even a few on my very unheated balcony and they not only do fine but they look better than those kept in more heated condistions.

Watering in the winter should be kept to an absolute minimum. It's case of balance here. While the plants have evolved to grow in low rainfall areas I find that Stapeliads in particular do not cope well with long periods without water - say an entire English winter. What happens is the roots die off and while they will re-grow rapidly in the spring once water is given, there is a distinct risk of the plant rotting off. I find it better to lightly water every couple of months. A friend does this by dipping the pot in water and leaving for a few seconds. I'd only water during warmer weather - never if the plants are not heated and there is a risk of frost.

The main pests to watch out for with Stapeliads in particular, is mealy bug and occasionally wooly aphid. They seem to attract the former like a magnet! Keep a bottle of Provado handy - you'll need it!

Phil

#7 An D Smith

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 12:16 PM

A beautiful plant Tim.


I still have a spare Stapelia gigantea free to anyone who wants to pay the postage (around a fiver) The plant was exhibited at the Chelsea Flower Show this year by the Durban Botanic Gardens.



Cheers
Andy

#8 Les

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 14:09 PM

Hi Andy

If you pm me your address i will send you a cheque for the postage

Regards Les