Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Genlisea cultivation Requirements?


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Kath

 
Kath
  • Members
  • 30 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand
 

Posted 24 August 2008 - 04:59 AM

Hello.
I am considering getting a genlisea in future (if I can ever find one in NZ!) but first (before I spend months tracking one down...) I want to make sure I could grow one.
So here are my questions:

1. Do they have a dormancy? If so, what kind - summer or winter?
2. I've heard they're semi-aquatic - they like it wet. Is this true?
3. Do they need to be fed? If so, what? And how muhc/often?
4. What temperatures does it like, and what are the minimum temperatures before it'll die?

I mostly want to know where I'd have to grow it. I could grow it at home, or at my nanas. At home the temperature is about 25-30 in summer, give or take a bit, and down to 8 during the day and down to 2 at night in winter. I think this may be too cold in witner unless they have dormancy. At my nanas the temperature is constantly above 20 - winter or summer, rain or shine, in fact its usually around 25. On the windowsill at night in winter 15 degrees celcius is the minimum. It could rise to around 30, maybe more in a sealed environment.

So which of these soudns better, or neither?

#2 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 24 August 2008 - 12:08 PM

I've always treated them like a terrestrial Utric, meaning that I kept them inside, either at window sills or under artificial lighting. I've only had a couple types and both were best kept near room temp. I gave them collected rain or creek water. The latter always had some living organisms, which they fed upon. They do seem to like wet conditions Once I tried putting the pot in a plastic container such that the pot rested on the lid of the container, allowing the "roots" to go through the drainage holes into the water of the container.

This is G. hispidula:

Posted Image

Edited by jimscott, 24 August 2008 - 12:17 PM.


#3 Jefforever

 
Jefforever
  • Full Members
  • 247 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berkeley, California, USA
  • Interests:Carnivorous Plants ,Flamenco Guitar, Aboriginal Artwork
 

Posted 25 August 2008 - 03:30 AM

Jim's right...

If you wanna grow genlisea, you could go with G. hispidula. It's very easy to grow. I grow it with my pings and tropical dews.

#4 renef

 
renef
  • Full Members
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:netherlands
 

Posted 01 June 2010 - 22:49 PM

i'll get my first genlisea lobata x violacea, this week.

how deep do they grow, what pot do i need.

#5 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 02 June 2010 - 13:57 PM

Here's something you can try:

Posted Image

#6 renef

 
renef
  • Full Members
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:netherlands
 

Posted 02 June 2010 - 19:12 PM

hi jim,

i'll put my plant in a 15 cm pot and a bigger pot for high waterlevel.

thanks.




Here's something you can try:

Posted Image



#7 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 03 June 2010 - 12:52 PM

There's a famous picture, somewhere, of a setup like that, only you can actually see the bladders. I think the author of it is someone named Jeff Wong. Maybe someone can find it...

#8 renef

 
renef
  • Full Members
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:netherlands
 

Posted 03 June 2010 - 13:37 PM

peter d'amato's the savage garden, page287, photo by geoff wong.
i just bought the book, nice picture.

#9 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 04 June 2010 - 12:34 PM

LOL! Yeah... Geoff Wong!

What I have toyed with and never actually did is to set up a plastic container that accommodates several pots of utrics and Genlisea, and have it overlay a fishtank or plastic tote and have that container filled with water so that the roots would extend through the bottom of the pots, into the water. And then take a picture!

#10 Tim Caldwell

 
Tim Caldwell
  • Full Members
  • 321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
 

Posted 04 June 2010 - 15:48 PM

LOL! Yeah... Geoff Wong!

What I have toyed with and never actually did is to set up a plastic container that accommodates several pots of utrics and Genlisea, and have it overlay a fishtank or plastic tote and have that container filled with water so that the roots would extend through the bottom of the pots, into the water. And then take a picture!


I'm trying that at the moment with some utrics, but too early to tell how well it'll work - so far just a single stolon protruding from the bottom of my U. tridentata's pot. But what I've learnt so far from having transparent pots (wrapped in layers of black plastic to keep the light out) is that most utric stolons seem to grow pretty close to the surface, so in future I'm going to pot them into very shallow substrate. Anyway it seemed to work pretty well for Elgecko:

http://mysite.verizo...tricularia.html

Cheers,
Tim

#11 jimscott

 
jimscott
  • Full Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, New York
  • Interests:Tropical fish, Carnivorous Plants, Gardening, Scrabble, Ping-Pong, Disco and New Wave Music
 

Posted 05 June 2010 - 14:38 PM

Steve had a nice setup. I'm thinking a fishtank would work well enough for seeing and pictures. A typical garden center plastic tray that holds several pots can overlay the perimeter and yet be in the water.

#12 BobZ

 
BobZ
  • Full Members
  • 715 posts
  • Location:northwestern California USA
  • Interests:Carnivorous plants
 

Posted 07 June 2010 - 16:35 PM

Geoff Wong's setup was also the cover of the June 1995 issue of CPN.
Posted Image

Edited by BobZ, 07 June 2010 - 16:37 PM.


#13 Tim Caldwell

 
Tim Caldwell
  • Full Members
  • 321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
 

Posted 08 June 2010 - 07:43 AM

Geoff Wong's setup was also the cover of the June 1995 issue of CPN.


That looks fantastic. In my opinion genlisea and Utricularia become ten times more interesting when you can actually see the traps.

A few years ago I saw an amazing setup for genlisea at the VCPS show here in Melbourne that had been made by a guy who, I was told, works with plastic for a living. Pretty much the same thing as in the picture but bigger and more impressive, with the word "GENLISEA" moulded onto the side.

Cheers,
Tim

#14 Sean Spence

 
Sean Spence
  • Full Members
  • 2,153 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Interests:CP's particularly Drosera, Australian Terrestrial Orchids, Rupicolous Brazilian Laelia Orchids, Arisaema, Stapeliads, Bromeliads.
 

Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:26 AM

A few years ago I saw an amazing setup for genlisea at the VCPS show here in Melbourne that had been made by a guy who, I was told, works with plastic for a living.


Stuart McIlroy was the guy. Last year he brought along this nice display of U. longifolia with traps extending into the water.

Posted Image

#15 Tim Caldwell

 
Tim Caldwell
  • Full Members
  • 321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
 

Posted 08 June 2010 - 15:31 PM

Stuart McIlroy was the guy. Last year he brought along this nice display of U. longifolia with traps extending into the water.]



Hey Sean,

Yeah, must be the same guy - he comes up with some amazing contraptions. Until I saw that earlier setup I'd never really even considered genlisea as an option (availability, condititons etc.), but found a new appreciation for the genus when I saw the setup I described.

I find that there's a strange kind of intrigue with genlisea and utricularia that comes from having plants that appear so harmless on the surface, but which are actually drawing all their resources from catching countless microscopic animals.

With setups like these you not only get to really appreciate the plants as being truly carnivorous, but also see them in a kind of self contained "ant farm" environment, which I kind of enjoy.

Cheers,
Tim

Edited by Tim Caldwell, 08 June 2010 - 18:57 PM.


#16 Tim Caldwell

 
Tim Caldwell
  • Full Members
  • 321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
 

Posted 08 June 2010 - 18:56 PM

Oops, too many buttons.

Edited by Tim Caldwell, 08 June 2010 - 18:58 PM.