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Anchoring a greenhouse


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#1 Dode

 
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Posted 05 February 2008 - 21:06 PM

Hi

What in your opinion is the best way to anchor a 6x8 aluminium greenhouse to paving slabs. I do have M6 coach screws with 10mm rawplugs but I am worried they may split the slab. What has anyone else used to good effect? It can get pretty windy up here and I dont want to lose my greenhouse/collection.

Thanks :wink:

#2 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 05 February 2008 - 22:45 PM

Using rawlbolts is the right idea,but paving slabs isn't.You need to cast a concrete base,about 3" deep,you can remove the slabs or cast the concrete right on top of them.Not hard, a couple of hours should see the base done.Let the concrete stand about three days before drilling for your bolts :wink: .

#3 Alexis

 
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Posted 05 February 2008 - 23:36 PM

No More Nails has seen me right so far! I applied it to the underside of the frame, attaching it to the paving slabs, although this can only be done before putting the glass in.

To be honest though, the weight of the glass is the main anchor for a greenhouse. The wind removing the glass is what tends to wreck greenhouses.

#4 gotcher

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 06:01 AM

You need stainless steel bolts others will rusts . As for no more nails It's not waterproof .

#5 mobile

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 07:59 AM

Using rawlbolts is the right idea,but paving slabs isn't.

Slabs have the advantage of allowing for drainage through the gaps between them so you don't get puddles. To anchor to slabs I'd use quite a few smaller screws, say 10 x No.10 x 2" and suitable large plastic rawplugs.

Edited by mobile, 06 February 2008 - 08:03 AM.


#6 ada

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 08:18 AM

if slabs are all you've got they will be o.k.Just drill them using a small masonary bit for a pilot hole,then use a larger masonary bit and redrill the hole.
A 7 mm bit is o.k for brown masonary plugs.try not to drill too near to the edge of the slabs and dont over tighten the screws,this will avoid cracking the slabs.

#7 Alexis

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 10:31 AM

As for no more nails It's not waterproof .


The exterior stuff is!

http://www.makingdiy...xterior-ss.html

#8 gotcher

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 10:42 AM

If you want to screw it down a cheaper way would be to use brass round head screws with brass washers they won't rust . If you use that hard as nails outdoor the question is how long is it going to last nobody knows I don't think it will last much more than ten years ? .

#9 mobile

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 11:57 AM

A 7 mm bit is o.k for brown masonary plugs.try not to drill too near to the edge of the slabs and dont over tighten the screws,this will avoid cracking the slabs.


...and a 7mm masonary bit with brown rawlplugs is ideal for No.10 screws as this is the minimum size of screw they accept so won't expand them too much, thus reducing the risk of splitting the slab :wink:

Edited by mobile, 06 February 2008 - 12:01 PM.


#10 ada

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 13:54 PM

Mobile,you know that and i know that.But not every one does as you can tell when you go round to look a various jobs.Some people just have no idea at all.
I was just try to help from a long way away,your alot nearer why dont you pop round and lend an experts hand?

#11 mobile

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 14:41 PM

Mobile,you know that and i know that.But not every one does as you can tell when you go round to look a various jobs.Some people just have no idea at all.
I was just try to help from a long way away,your alot nearer why dont you pop round and lend an experts hand?


No exactly round the corner... Dode lives approx 125 miles from me!

#12 Rogier

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 18:06 PM

Hi

What in your opinion is the best way to anchor a 6x8 aluminium greenhouse to paving slabs. I do have M6 coach screws with 10mm rawplugs but I am worried they may split the slab. What has anyone else used to good effect? It can get pretty windy up here and I dont want to lose my greenhouse/collection.

Thanks :clapping:


I made last year an instruction how to assemble a greenhouse, bolting it to slabs is also explained, may be it wil inspire you.

www.carnivorousplants.nl Click than on "information"; click then on "constructing a greenhouse.

Goodluck!

#13 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 18:57 PM

There is no need to use screws & plugs these days-use "hammerfix screws". Once you've positioned your base-frame there is no need to remove it in order to drill e.g if the holes in the frame are 8mm choose Hammerfix with a 7mm plastic shank, you then use a 7mm masonry bit and drill carefully through the holes into the slab, when using Hammerfix it doesn't matter if you go too deep,in fact go a little deeper. Clear the hole of dust and place in the Hammerfix GENTLEY tap down with a hammer and then screw down snug with the screwdriver-easy, you'll be amazed at how the Hammerfix's bite tight. I used to be a joiner and have used them hundreds of times, they're one of those things that should have been invented fifty years ago.
Here's a Hammerfix:-
Posted Image

Edited by petesredtraps, 06 February 2008 - 19:08 PM.


#14 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 19:24 PM

Errrrrrrrr that hammerfix looks a lot like a plug with a screw in it to me. :clapping:

#15 gardenofeden

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 20:12 PM

I made last year an instruction how to assemble a greenhouse, bolting it to slabs is also explained, may be it wil inspire you.

www.carnivorousplants.nl Click than on "information"; click then on "constructing a greenhouse.

Goodluck!


very useful guide Rogier!

#16 Dode

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 20:24 PM

Thanks for all your replies and advice. I will try the rawplug and screw method as I have this to hand. Again thanks for all your replies.

#17 wallsg7

 
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Posted 06 February 2008 - 21:15 PM

Dont know if this helps but ive just finished building a greenhouse.It came with many L shaped pieces of metal which had a hole in each side.One side was bolted to a down strutt of the greenhouse and the other was screwed into the floor.I had to go round and fix these to each down strutt...around 30 in total.The screw depth and size,surprisingly, wasnt particularly large.2 inch screws will do.As i understood it the corner fixings are the most important.

Gary

#18 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 07 February 2008 - 11:16 AM

Errrrrrrrr that hammerfix looks a lot like a plug with a screw in it to me. :yes:


That's basically exactly what it is Fred, but you have to use them to appreciate them.No more messing around with seperate rawl plugs & screws. You see ,when you use the hammer to drive them in,as you are doing so the screw winds itself into the plug, you just then finish them off with a couple of turns with the screwdriver,and by heck do they get hold.Just try them,you'll not faff around with seperate plugs & screws again. I used to hate endless turning with the screwdriver when hanging doors etc,all I got from it were forearms like Popeye.

#19 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 07 February 2008 - 15:02 PM

all I got from it were forearms like Popeye.



The real test is............. do you like spinach?

#20 petesredtraps

 
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Posted 07 February 2008 - 19:16 PM

The real test is............. do you like spinach?

As a matter of fact I do Fred,but probably no where near as much as one of your cephalotus "Big boy" ,so the next time you're letting one go think of ME! :yes: .