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#1 stozy

 
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Posted 26 January 2008 - 21:02 PM

Hi in october i moved my S.flava and D.capensis outside for dormancy.

The capensis has died back fully and the flava is fully dormant. I would like to bring them back inside for the growing season as i am kinda doing a test on the dormancy out or in to see if it makes a difference :roll:. so i was wondering when it would be fine to move them back inside to a window sill.

It will not be much warmer as the room has the window open lots etc....

so anyway when should i do it? should i wait untill they start to grow or should i do it around the beginning of feb ?

thanks :P

ps, hope this aint a totally stupid question....

#2 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 26 January 2008 - 21:10 PM

I have to admit to being a little puzzled.

Why did you feel the need to throw your D. capensis outside for a Scottish winter?

#3 Alexis

 
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Posted 26 January 2008 - 21:14 PM

It doesn't need a dormancy, but I think it looks better with fresh new growth every spring coming back from the roots personally.

I wouldn't bring the flava inside though. It will try to grow with the increased temperature but end up growing floppy pitchers because of the low light.

#4 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 26 January 2008 - 21:17 PM

It doesn't need a dormancy, but I think it looks better with fresh new growth every spring coming back from the roots personally.



A pair of scissors can help :roll:

Edited by FredG, 26 January 2008 - 21:17 PM.


#5 stozy

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 11:33 AM

I put the capensis out for it to naturally die back (without scissors)

and ok so is there a time to bring the flava in? or just leave it out all year? :) maybe i should throw it in my little bog :wink:

#6 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 14:43 PM

I put the capensis out for it to naturally die back



My point exactly........ why did you want it to die back?

It's not natural.

#7 stozy

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 18:47 PM

becuase it was long and very ugly...and i was told that was a good idea on this forum.

#8 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 18:51 PM

becuase it was long and very ugly...and i was told that was a good idea on this forum.


You will be told many things on this forum.

You don't have to accept them all as being good advice.

Look upon it as panning for gold.

You have to sift a lot of rubbish to get a few useful grains.

#9 stozy

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 22:14 PM

right........not much good in this topic then ;)

naa i trust the people on here like Alexis and Sheila

#10 blueflytrap

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 22:42 PM

Stozy,
Firstly I normally wouldn't leave any of my Flava's (or any other Sarracenia, apart from venosa) out in the Winter.
I've done it before and whilst the plants don't appear to suffer much, it means their season is considerably shortened (coz it takes them longer to wake up), leading to them over 3-5 years, a lot worse off than their 'grown in the greenhouse' bretheren. I've also found that those exposed to extremes, don't flower as well, sometimes not dropping pollen at all.
Also the weather this year has (IMHO) been a damm site milder than it normally is. All you need is a prolonged freeze (with wind) and the weather will freeze -dry your plant (and Winter ain't over yet not by a long chalk).

If you do bring the plant in shortly, then it will grow, but even in full light the growth will be weaker and it won't put up with you putting the plant out later in the year (unless you tie up the pitchers). If you leave it outside then the pitcher growth will be stronger (and shorter) and later, with possibly no seed production.

They are your choices- its up to you what you want to do!!!

Regards

#11 Guest_Sheila_*

 
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Posted 27 January 2008 - 23:41 PM

Stozy, if you have a shed with a window or a sheltered spot that will be better than bringing the plants indoors. The cape will do well indoors, but I always leave mine in the greenhouse to die back for the winter, they always return from the roots so I don't worry about them. I have too many other plants taking up windowsill space to bring in plants that will survive quite adequately in the greenhouse, even if it isn't the way they would naturally grow in the wild.

#12 stozy

 
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Posted 28 January 2008 - 13:22 PM

i have a south facing green house ? :happy:

would that be ok

#13 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 28 January 2008 - 14:13 PM

i have a south facing green house ? :happy:

would that be ok



If you have, that's where the plants should have been in the first place

#14 stozy

 
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Posted 28 January 2008 - 16:11 PM

ye....well 2 reasons that it was not there.....there was no space and i wanted to give it a good hard winter cos it has not been a very good plant for me inside :happy:

but if i moved it there now do u think it would notice and start growing weakly?

#15 Guest_Aidan_*

 
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Posted 28 January 2008 - 17:40 PM

Put the plant in the greenhouse and leave it there. As Fred notes, it is the best place. Being closer to the Arctic :happy: than most of us, your plants will have a short growing season anyway.

#16 stozy

 
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Posted 28 January 2008 - 20:17 PM

lol not that much :happy:

my first shoot is appearing :happy: (inside) :oops:

#17 Guest_Sheila_*

 
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Posted 29 January 2008 - 00:19 AM

I would have kept the plants in the greenhouse for the winter months. They would get a hard enough winter in the greenhouse.

#18 stozy

 
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Posted 29 January 2008 - 13:25 PM

i have done the same as the last like 3 - 4 years and every year my plants are getting better and bigger :) cant be too bad ? :D

if they stop growing over winter is that enough? or do u like them to be frozen or just cold ? :P my room didnt have heating for the first half of winter lol and the window is open all day :yes:

#19 Guest_FredG_*

 
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Posted 29 January 2008 - 15:25 PM

i have done the same as the last like 3 - 4 years and every year my plants are getting better


If you have 3 - 4 years experience why are you asking for advice now?

#20 stozy

 
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Posted 29 January 2008 - 16:18 PM

no...no...no...

of keeping the plant with the shoot (and a few more) inside

completely different thing.....please stop looking to big faults with me......geez