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Sulawesi Neps Part Three - save the best till last....


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#1 Jonathan

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 14:05 PM

While trying to get closer to a roosting Diabolical Nightjar (don't some birds have fantastic names? - it's also known as Satanic Nightjar) I found these little beauties - N. eymae as far as I can tell!

Look on the extreme left of the photo - there is a pitcher visible!

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An unopened trap:

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I love the angular shape of the pitchers.

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#2 V.J.Treasure

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 14:13 PM

Great pitchers :)

#3 glider14

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 14:23 PM

that doesnt look like eyame! wow...ive never seen somthing like it! we need an expert in here to state what it is!!
Alex

#4 Neil Cornish

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 14:45 PM

Stunning and to see them in the wild as well must have been such a high. Thanks for sharing.


Regards Neil

#5 JRFxtreme

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 15:20 PM

Thats a unique looking nepenthes. It may be a hybrid with N. maxima(if thats what the others in the previous posts were.) since it kind of shares the same coloring. Nice find! :lol:

#6 lil_flytrap_kid

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 15:52 PM

Woah definetely best till last!

Love the second picture.

So unusual.

Thanks for sharing :lol:

#7 Sockhom

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 16:04 PM

Hello Jonathan :lol: !


You did a wonderful trip!
Those late pictures are true gems.

But i don't think they're eymae upper picthers either. I also suspect a hybrid involving Nepenthes maxima.
Then again, i could be wrong.


Friendly,

Fran├žois.

#8 schimatrix

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 19:12 PM

stunning pictures Jonathan :lol:
thanks for sharing

giu

#9 christerb

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 20:22 PM

Thanks for showing the wonderful photos (in all threads). My first thought was N. eymae as well, but from what I have seen the lid is much narrower on the upper pitchers on this species. Whatever it is, it has not only nice shape, but it is very colourful as well, more so than most uppers I have seen from the "N. maxima complex".

Regards,

Christer

#10 Jonathan

 
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Posted 20 October 2006 - 06:18 AM

Thanks for the input guys - N. maxima was growing very close to this plant, but I do wonder what that makes the other parent?

#11 Greg Allan

 
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Posted 20 October 2006 - 08:48 AM

Thanks for posting such fascinating photos.

Cheers,

#12 chug

 
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Posted 20 October 2006 - 13:15 PM

This is a fantastic looking nep. I really like its pitchers. :) Nice one!

#13 Guest_Sheila_*

 
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Posted 20 October 2006 - 22:06 PM

Fantastic pictures. :(
It must have been difficult concentrating on your twitching with so many lovely neps about you. :)

#14 Blackout

 
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Posted 28 October 2006 - 22:11 PM

Stunning ! No hamata around there ? :)

#15 Amori

 
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Posted 28 October 2006 - 22:30 PM

Absolutely stunning.
I posted my own thoughts about this plant over on the Nepenthes forum; I'm personally convinced there is no maxima involved at all at the direct parent level - there are too many characteristics on that plant which don't even express remnants of such parentage, let alone those of eymae (lid, leaves, stem etc.).
Then again, I could be proven very, very wrong! ;)

Cheers
Amori

#16 Guest_Aidan_*

 
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Posted 29 October 2006 - 00:07 AM

A lovely plant.

Nepenthes "Jungle Khazi" perhaps... :D

#17 Sockhom

 
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Posted 29 October 2006 - 08:52 AM

... or Jonathan might have discovered a new taxa? :D

#18 Jonathan

 
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Posted 29 October 2006 - 13:12 PM

Where did you post Kera? Would be interested in knowing anyone's thoughts on this plant. I take it that the first plant at least is N. maxima (prev threads)?

#19 Amori

 
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Posted 29 October 2006 - 18:52 PM

Hi Jonathan
I posted on the pitcherplant forums (http://www.pitcherpl...4.com/index.cgi). I'm almost certain you have taken photographic evidence of a glabrata hybrid or an entirely new taxon. I went against a direct maxima parentage because the whole plant, including the pitcher appearances do not match. Here's why:

1) Leaves of maxima and eymae are strongly petiolate, whereas this plant's leaves are as sessile as can be and clasping. Had you taken photos of plants in their rosette stage and their pitchers, I could add more, had they been present.

2) Pitcher morphology:
i) lid shape is orbicular as opposed to narrow, especially for aerial pitchers - lid shape defines the shape of the pitcher opening when it opens (take inermis, for example). In this case, the pitcher is fully inflated and the lid covers the mouth entirely;

ii) lid underside is missing glandular crests, or even remnants thereof;

iii) peristome isn't substantial enough to warrant it direct eymae and maxima parentage, even if they belong to aerial pitchers.

I'm sure there's more I could say, but I'm limited on time for the moment so I'll leave it at that. As a final note, I believe this potential* taxon will be greatly sought after if and once it enters cultivation through legitimate methods - it is indeed endowed with very attractive upper pitchers!

Cheers
Amori

* Thanks Aidan for pointing that out. It seems I've been using the term taxon incorrectly! :lol: :D

Edited by Amori, 09 February 2008 - 23:09 PM.


#20 Amori

 
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Posted 29 October 2006 - 18:53 PM

A lovely plant.

Nepenthes "Jungle Khazi" perhaps... :lol:


Remember Aidan, Nepenthes jamban has already taken the toilet title! :D

Cheers
Amori