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How to propagate Drosera cuttings in water (with photos)


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#41 rsivertsen

 
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Posted 17 May 2008 - 23:05 PM

Yeah, I know, just curious, that's all.

#42 lil_flytrap_kid

 
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Posted 17 May 2008 - 23:49 PM

Sorry, I realise how snide that sounds!
Just wanted to add that in case any 'newbies' as such decided to try and propagate pygmy sundews with leaf cuttings, not knowing about gemmae.

#43 albinkolano

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 11:46 AM

Should the box with cuttings be closed all time? Or should i open it from time to time? And if closed box gets some direct sun light there won't be too hot inside?

#44 Guest_Wudang_*

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 13:15 PM

Better use plastic to cover the box and make some holes... my Box with the cuttings were mostly under my 21W T5 Lamp. I didnt put it under the sun because it may get really hot inside the plastic pot (and mostly didnt have a bright sun here) and as far as i know mostly Dorseras are pretty easy to propagate in the water...

Good Luck,Wu

#45 cgarry

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 14:24 PM

I keep the container with the water and cuttings closed all the time, except when I check the cuttings once a week. Do not make any holes in the lid, there is no need and it will just increase the chances of the water going off.
When the cuttings are still in water just let them have indirect sunlight only, they might start to cook in direct sunlight!

Cheers,

#46 albinkolano

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 14:28 PM

One more question. Should cuttings float under water (whole cutting in water) or only bottom part of cutting should be in water?

#47 cgarry

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 16:00 PM

One more question. Should cuttings float under water (whole cutting in water) or only bottom part of cutting should be in water?


I usually prod the cutting until it is below the surface and the whole cutting is in the water. However, I doubt if it really matters.

Cheers,

#48 jimscott

 
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Posted 18 May 2008 - 17:24 PM

For cuttings in enclosed containers with moist media I keep covered until they sprout. Then I take the cover off and make sure they are hydrated long enough for the plants to take root. For cuttings enclosed in just water the moisture around the enclosure is enough to keep them hydrated, even if they aren't in 100% water. Acclimating to the real world I transfer to a pot that is overfilled with water and allow the plants to nestle into the media while the excess water evaporates.

#49 Rez

 
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Posted 09 June 2008 - 20:31 PM

This works well:

Posted Image


I know someone already asked something about whether the leaves should be on top or below the water, but I just wanted to ask, in your photo here, are these completely submerged? It's tricky to see how much water is in the phial, or whatever they are. What are they? lol

#50 RL7836

 
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Posted 03 July 2008 - 16:18 PM

This is an excellent thread - I frequently send folks over to read it when they have questions (much quicker - since almost all questions are answered). Shame that it's not a 'sticky'....

When the cuttings are still in water just let them have indirect sunlight only, they might start to cook in direct sunlight!

As an FYI, I place mine in an east-facing window where they get a few hours of direct sun each morning. The water doesn't get hot and the results have been excellent.

As would be expected, since the 2 parents work well with this method, D. x hybrida (filiformis*intermedia) does also - here's a recent pic (in a test tube):
Posted Image

Edited by RL7836, 28 February 2013 - 02:22 AM.


#51 mark.ca

 
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Posted 03 July 2008 - 18:54 PM

Just curious, has anyone tried to propagate pygmy Dros by leaf cuttings, either by water, or otherwise? - Rich

It is working for some of the pygmy species too. There was a post on Terraforums about 2 monts ago showing a succesfull leaf cutting in water of a lake badgerup. I'm currently trying with lasiantha but nothing yet! Probably i have to wait a bit longer than a week!

#52 Veek

 
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Posted 29 July 2008 - 23:05 PM

Love this technique :D . I've had succes with Binata, Bainata multifida extrema and couple others. Now trying with Regia, Dionaea Muscipula,..... :rolleyes:

I was just thinking could this technique work with seeds as well? Don't see why not. Anyone experience with this?

#53 jimscott

 
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Posted 30 July 2008 - 17:56 PM

D. regia? Bon chance! Some of us have done seeds in water with success. When ya think about it, some of these species are dropping seeds in puddles of water in nature.

#54 Veek

 
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Posted 30 July 2008 - 20:46 PM

I know they say Regia doesn't work but what the heck I had an extra leaf so I tried it. Seems to fail though. :happy:
I've just setup test with 3 kinds of seed Binata, Venusta and Nidiformis so let's see what happens. :Laie_97:

#55 onny

 
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Posted 31 July 2008 - 03:11 AM

wow, fantastic! I'll try it. Thank's for sharing

onny

#56 crumble

 
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Posted 28 August 2008 - 15:59 PM

I took a whole lot of leaf cuttings from my two cristate drosera red capensis plants a week ago, I am curious to see if the leaf cuttings assuming they are successful will grow normally or cristate like the parents.

#57 Duane

 
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Posted 28 August 2008 - 16:42 PM

I took a whole lot of leaf cuttings from my two cristate drosera red capensis plants a week ago, I am curious to see if the leaf cuttings assuming they are successful will grow normally or cristate like the parents.


Hi crumble a bit off topic but have you tried root cuttings ?

I took some and about 2-3 weeks later they were just beginning to sprout through the peat .

Duane

#58 crumble

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 16:00 PM

Hi Duane,

yes I took one root cutting earlier this summer and right now its growth looks quite normal, in fact it isn't even looking very red like the parent plant but that might be because its been kept in a heavily shaded part of the greenhouse. I have a feeling propogating these cristate capensis is not going to prove that easy.

Mary

#59 Kath

 
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Posted 31 August 2008 - 09:11 AM

I tried this with some D. Capensis a few months ago.
Well, actually I put them ina sealed jar of water, shoved them ina draw and forgot about thme for a few months. Came back about 2 months later and I had a number of sprouts trying to grow!
I don't really want Capensis sprouts any more, but I allowed them to keep growing - mainly because I want to see how long they'll live without soil. So I placed them in some sun but they're in the same container in the same water. All of the 'mother' leaves have died off now - and the stems of the capensis sprouts are going mushy. But still they grow on, without any sign of stopping. I broke a few off the dead mother leaves a month ago - they're refusing to grow roots - so how on Earth are they still surviving and actively growing?

#60 Duane

 
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Posted 02 September 2008 - 22:40 PM

Posted Image
Drosera capensis crestate form grown fron root cuttings .

Duane