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Tropicat

Growing (highland) Nepenthes in the windowsill

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In response to a different topic I decided to share a bit more about the Nepenthes i grow in my windowsill. I believe the 10C drop in the night is the most important condition to grow healthy plants in the windowsill. I achieve the 10C drop by keeping my winddow open at night. I close it during the day in the winter. My winter temps are 5-10C at night to 15-20 C during the day. In the summer it gets a bit tricky. We have had 30C during the day, so I leave the window open day and night. This way I can get 15-20 C in the night and 25-30 C during the day. Officially this is too hot for N. hamata and N. rajah. I planted my rajah in a very tall pot, and it seems to be doing fine in that. the hamata i planted in a big basket. This way it takes way longer for the soil to warm up, so this should keep the roots cool. I have done this with Louisa and ventrata as well, which seems to have had a good effect. If it really gets too hot, i put rainwater in plastic bags in the freezer, creating ice cubes. I then put these in the soil (not touching the plants). (I also have done this for my darlingtonia). I don't know if this makes a big difference, but it hasn't harmed them either. 

I try to keep humidity at a minimum of 50%, preferrably higher, but this is quite a challenge. I rarely get the humidity above 70%. Because my humidity is lower, I have difficulty getting my neps to pitcher. It takes them at least a year to acclimatize. After that they do actually pitcher in the lower humidity. My hamata and rajah are still too small, so we will see how they will do after a year. 

These are the neps i'm growing: 

N. hamata
N. Louisa (I have taken some cuttings, which i put outside per experiment. N. Louisa is a lowland / intermediate. I noticed it is more difficult for me to grow lowland or intermediate. I had a N. hookeriana, but it was just too cold for it, so it died unfortunately.)
N. rajah
N. sanguinea (It was labeled sanguinea in the shop where I bought it, but I have some doubts about this)
N. sibuyanensis
N. spectabilis
N. ventrata

I see leaf jumps on all of them, so they are growing fine. However, they dont all pitcher. N. Louisa, N. spectabilis and N. ventrata are producing plenty of pitchers. N. sanguinea is producing pitchers, but not very impressive ones. The rest im hoping will start to produce pitchers later in the year for me. I do notice they produce their pitchers in the summer, so I suspect extra lighting will stimulate this as well. Unfortunately the growing light i used broke. I may buy a new one for the winter, or I'll just see how they do without. Not sure yet. I don't like to be too fussy about my plants or  their care. I also don't mind experimenting with them and find their limits.

I'm curious if other people grow (highland) neps in the windowsill and if you guys have tips? 

N. rajah

20180603_130518

N. hamata. I put microfiber around it to keep the humidity high. I put a lid from a yoghurt pot on the soil. I use that as a tray to poor water in. The microfiber soaks up the water, so that it's evendly distributed around the plant. It kind of is an experiment, we will see if it works in time. 

20180603_130307

For some reason my N. ventrata decidedd to make 3 basal shoots. I just noticed this

20180604_110752

 My N. 'sanguinea' also made a basal a few months ago. 

20171104_101101

 

20180512_080742

 

 

 

Edited by Tropicat

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10c nights are a little on the low for those, 12-13c might perk up pitcher production. I had a ventricosa x sibuyanensis on the windowsill over winter, I had to move it as it didnt seem to like it. x rebecca soper did fine with 10c nights and x miranda.. well it killed the vine but it continued the sideshoot fine (huge leaves now) and has 2 more sideshoots next to it.

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yeah my plants do pitcher more in the summer. I don't know if thats bcs of temperature or amount of light

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I took 8 cuttings from my nepenthes Louisa and potted them up per experiment. Since I grow them in my windowsil (or outside) they are used to a lower humidity and room temperature (15-25 C). They even survived the heat wave outside!!
Would anyone be interested in having one (or more?) 
This is the motherplant just after taking cuttings: 

20180524_114302

And then 3 months later: 
 

20180811_155935

Pitcher of the motherplant: 

20170709_123912

These are some cuttings after 3 months, with new growth points: 

20180811_14265720180811_142709

 

Edited by Tropicat

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Hi! Can You post any photos of Your plants? Have they developed good pitchers? I’m very interested in Your experience, thanks... please, tell me another thing: does Your nepenthes keep direct sunlight? And what is Your window exposition (North facing, South, West or East)?

thanks 

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Hello, I tried also some nepenthes on windowsill. Some hybrids: izumiae x truncata, maxima x xtrusmadiensis and some pure ones:  truncata, ventricosa. All the plants were growing very nice during the summer and during the winter it was even better becasue of lower temperature. I think the plants were more sensitive on light and temperature than the humidity. It took some time for aclimatization, but finally the light and temprerature was the key issue. 

Can you please share, how is your hamata doing?

 

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5 hours ago, Petr said:

Hello, I tried also some nepenthes on windowsill. Some hybrids: izumiae x truncata, maxima x xtrusmadiensis and some pure ones:  truncata, ventricosa. All the plants were growing very nice during the summer and during the winter it was even better becasue of lower temperature. I think the plants were more sensitive on light and temperature than the humidity. It took some time for aclimatization, but finally the light and temprerature was the key issue. 

Can you please share, how is your hamata doing?

 

Thanks for writing Your experience 

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I'm currently growing most of my Nepenthes on a windowsill setup. This includes both species and hybrids.

Species:

singalana, platychila, truncata, robcantleyi, ovata, ventricosa, naga, campanulata (has flowered this year), sibuyanensis (has flowered this year), ramispina, gymnaphora, veitchii. Also a number of seedlings/plantlets of fusca, peltata, nigra and some others which have acclimatized to the windowsill environment and are now kicking off.

Hybrids:

lowii x ventricosa, lowii x truncata, robmata, trusmadiensis x burbidgeae, burbidgeae x edwardsiana (the new horticultural one), rebecca soper (flowered a few years back), bloody mary, miranda, truncata x inermis, aristo x ventricosa, veitchii x hurreliana.

I'm forgetting some but you get the idea ;)

They might be growing slower compared to plants growing in a greenhouse and they probably don't keep their pitchers as long, but they are doing well for me so far.

They are grown in a south facing large window. In the warmest part of summer I put a white sheet over them to pretect them from the hottest temperatures but this is something I've only started doing recently as the last two summers were really hot.

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Only a question: in winter I’ve got in my home minimum temperature of 12 C... is too cold for nepenthes truncata, nepenthes robcantleyi and their hybrids or they can grow quite well? 

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In my experience it takes a long time (1-2 years, some faster, than others) to get nepenthes acclimatised. After that, light is the most important factor, followed by temperature. The humidity here is always quite high. I keep my window open almost all of the year for good air movement. Because Holland is quite a humid country, it's always above 50%. Usually around 60-70. If it gets very low I use my humidifier. I have them in a south facing window, so the hottest window! When the temp goes above 30-35 C or if its a hot sun for a longer period of time, i close the curtain and use a lamp for light. I have noticed that neps can be severely damaged when they aren't acclimatised yet (leaves dont turn red, but immeidately get brown burnt spots), but once they are used to it, they can deal with quite a bit of sunshine (leaves slowly turn red; if they are too red, keep them out of the sun. I try to keep mine all green). 

Here is my N. hamata at the moment: 

20180915_104714 20180915_104719

 

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