Julio Collado

Red spots on Campanulata leaves

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I recently acquired a couple of Nepenthes Campanulata from AW, but they seem to be suffering.

Leaves are developing lots of red spots and are kinda yellowing, I believe its due to too low night temperatures (~15C). The rest of the day they're at about 30C.

Can these conditions kill my plants or it will just make them grow slower until they get kinda 'used' to the conditions? The growth point seems to be fine(?)

On an unrelated note, I have a small phalaenopsis that seems to be suffering the same as these plants, while I have another big one that is doing fine (and its exposed to colder temperatures than both campanulatas and the small phal)

 

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Theres not much I can do currently but wait for warmer temperatures to come, I may be able to get a heating pad, but that'll have to wait a couple weeks and Im not sure they'll survive until then.

Is there any -cheap and easy- way to make these plants dont suffer?

 

 

Edited by Julio Collado

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Hi! In my life I only had a very easy to grow nepenthes x ventrata.. I noticed similar red spots when it kept direct sunlight... the sun burnt the leaves... is it possible that You keep it in direct sunlight or too much close to a strong light?

 

Edited by Argo88

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If you want them to thrive, grow them on limestone, like in their natural habitat (waiting for others to disagree!..................)

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On 22/3/2018 at 4:46 PM, Argo88 said:

Hi! In my life I only had a very easy to grow nepenthes x ventrata.. I noticed similar red spots when it kept direct sunlight... the sun burnt the leaves... is it possible that You keep it in direct sunlight or too much close to a strong light?

 

I wouldn't know, they're growing in the same condition as all my indoors plants, some of which are Nepenthes Ventrata, Nepenthes Maxima, Drosera Capensis, Cephalotus...and they dont seem to worry about having such a thing as 'too much light'.

Right now theyre under 3 led bulbs of 6000K, providing a total of ~7k lumens.

On 24/3/2018 at 11:16 AM, Karsty said:

If you want them to thrive, grow them on limestone, like in their natural habitat (waiting for others to disagree!..................)

I thought they did fine in sphagnum with perlite too...?

Edited by Julio Collado

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16 minutes ago, Karsty said:

Hi Julio,

Well, there are a lot of different experiences. Here's mine growing in tufa and oak leafmould, doing very well :biggrin:

oX0yIVgX5Yn9ob7L9fS8zsxsR5xzTT4C8t9wqEeR

https://photos.app.goo.gl/YUi6bk9dm0nOImoX2

Looks fantastic! I may try a different soil if I manage to keep them alive for at least another year...if they make it.

But then again, no one solved my doubt about those weird red spots and I'm not sure if they'll survive, im really worried.

How much light do you give yours? Do you think it may be a problem of excessive lighting as Argo88 said? Or more related to the low temperatures at night as I suspect?

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20 minutes ago, Julio Collado said:

I wouldn't know, they're growing in the same condition as all my indoors plants, some of which are Nepenthes Ventrata, Nepenthes Maxima, Drosera Capensis, Cephalotus...and they dont seem to worry about having such a thing as 'too much light'.

Right now theyre under 3 led bulbs of 6000K, providing a total of ~7k lumens.

I thought they did fine in sphagnum with perlite too...?

Hi Julio!

no, the problem isn’t too much light... I’ve asked You if the plant is closer to light bulbs than nepenthes maxima, for exemple... 

d. Capensis and cephalotus grow very well in direct sunlight and also in hottest temperatures... I’ve grown these species in southest part of Italy in direct sunlight, also in July and August (45 C and more) and they have done well...

my nepenthes x ventrata, in the same condition, in direct sunlight of January made red spots, similar to Yours... So I had to move it in shadow...

my friend that grows heliamphoras in terrarium have bourned a lot of pitcher lids when the light bulbs were too close to the plants... is it possible that the light bulbs are closer to the leaves or make too much hot climate?

If not, it is another problem

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2 minutes ago, Argo88 said:

Hi Julio!

no, the problem isn’t too much light... I’ve asked You if the plant is closer to light bulbs than nepenthes maxima, for exemple... 

d. Capensis and cephalotus grow very well in direct sunlight and also in hottest temperatures... I’ve grown these species in southest part of Italy in direct sunlight, also in July and August (45 C and more) and they have done well...

my nepenthes x ventrata, in the same condition, in direct sunlight of January made red spots, similar to Yours... So I had to move it in shadow...

my friend that grows heliamphoras in terrarium have bourned a lot of pitcher lids when the light bulbs were too close to the plants... is it possible that the light bulbs are closer to the leaves or make too much hot climate?

If not, it is another problem

Theyre at about 20cm from the lightbulbs and the temperatures dont exceed 30C, so they're not getting too hot. And since these are lowlanders, even if it got to 35C it still shouldnt be a problem.

I may try putting them under the Ventrata leaves so they get a little bit less direct light and see how it goes

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I never had a N. Campanulata, but last year I had my Hamatas in similar conditions and they hated it, don't seem to like temps above 26c or below 16c.

21~24c to 17~18c (~73f to ~63f) is when they seem to be happier.

Edited by Whitefox

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It's impossible for me to be sure because I am not experienced enough. But 20cm from the light seems too close....? Mine is 140cm from a 45W LED 6000K spotlight, beam angle about 30°. Temperatures have only ever gone down to about 19°C minimum at night, and 22-32°C in the day depending on the time of year. And it gets some indirect natural light.

This is a really lovely blog to give guidance - http://carnivorousockhom.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/nepenthes-campanulata-in-situ.html

Edited by Karsty

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