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That process is called scarification:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarification_(botany)

 

It is done to help germination, in particular to seeds that have a hard coat or that are inhibited from germinating until it goes through an animal's digestive tract or suffers some physical damage. For that some seeds are quickly submerged in acid or polished to remove its protection.

 

I did it a few times with citrus seeds (removing the peel), but never seen it being done to carnivorous plant seeds before.

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On ‎2018‎年‎4‎月‎4‎日 at 11:24 PM, PofW_Feathers said:

Is there anybody being familiar with the technical terms?

I call what I removed the Nepenthes seed husk. Some members on TerraForums, where I am stubborn, arrogant, and....:smile:, call it the Nepenthes seed coat. TerraForums

The membrane that I provisionally call the seed coat still wraps the actual seed, except the one end where the root will be emerging. It still seems to protect the seed.

I illustrate it by using the peanut though it is improper.

Could anyone explain the technical terms?

 

 

On ‎2018‎年‎4‎月‎5‎日 at 9:05 AM, Whitefox said:

That process is called scarification:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarification_(botany)

 

It is done to help germination, in particular to seeds that have a hard coat or that are inhibited from germinating until it goes through an animal's digestive tract or suffers some physical damage. For that some seeds are quickly submerged in acid or polished to remove its protection.

 

I did it a few times with citrus seeds (removing the peel), but never seen it being done to carnivorous plant seeds before.

 

Konnichiwa!

 

Dear Whitefox-san,

Thank you very much! “scarification”!…. a bit scary…

Some growers remove Ibicella seed husk in my country.

 

Jan-san (Dr. Jan Schlauer), who has been a good friend of mine since I joined the cp-listserve in 1994, answered my question.

......

Regarding the seed coat, this is the commonly used term. The external form and the mechanical properties of the seed are defined by the outer layer that is called testa. Additionally the embryo is included in the inner (protective) layer that is called tegmen and is a thin membranous peel in Nepenthes. Other seeds have endosperm that additionally surrounds the embryo, but in Nepenthes the endosperm is not well developed or lacking whatsoever.

......

 

Kind regards from the Far East

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Konnichiwa!

40651794171_422f113456_o.jpg

I took the photo on March 06 in 2018.

After I took the above photo, I sowed these seeds. It seems the old seedlings have the strength to push through their seed husk.

 

I took the following photos on April 12 in 2018.

39600467570_7925b77101_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

41366992492_4869e377b6_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

41368000212_11ce733f42_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

Though I don't understand the conditions for the appropriate storage of the Nepenthes seeds, it seems viability among Nepenthes seeds is a lot longer than what we may think and have/may read, as N_CloudySkies-san said on TF (page 4).

 

Kind regards from the Far East

Edited by PofW_Feathers
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Update 05

I took the photos on April 12 in 2018.

 

41374612102_6e036af679_b.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

41417178881_368f0ba656_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

27545695098_2690c89d6b_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

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Update 06

I took the photos on May 16 in 2018.

28277923428_8c0ef10887_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

42103678682_261df1233d_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

42150546821_28b6986ece_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

27279478177_89afaefd24_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

 

28277923258_ba388aab3b_o.jpg

The germination from 5 years old Nepenthes eymae seeds (stored for 5 years in refrigerator)

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