Craig Malcolm Gibbon

Advise needed.

Recommended Posts

Hi Group,

I'm about to set up my first bog garden for a few, 3,  VFT clones. I have a standard shaped  plastic flower pot which is 40 cms large. Would you guys advise about drilling a hole about 2 inches from the top to drain the excess water out? The pot does not have any drainage holes in it.  

Regards 

 

Craig 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karsty    12

Hi Craig,

That's a very small bog garden. I would drill the holes 6 inches from the top. And it might pay to put a 1 or 2 inch layer of natural charcoal in the bottom, just the barbecue type, not "instant lighting", not briquettes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carambola    22

You don't need any drainage holes in a bog garden. You can drill some close to the top as you were already planning to do if you don't want the pot to overflow after heavy rainfall, but it isn't necessary if you don't have any plants (like Pinguicula) that could float away. One thing I would note is, because your pot is relatively small, it's more likely to freeze in winter, so you should keep it somewhere it's less likely to freeze when it gets cold - this could even be in an unheated room in your house. Otherwise not much you can do wrong, just keep the soil as wet as you can.

2 hours ago, Karsty said:

I would drill the holes 6 inches from the top.

What would that accomplish other than requiring the moss/peat/etc to wick the water up fifteen cm before it reaches the top? And what would the charcoal do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karsty    12

Most carnivorous plants like their roots wet, but not actually underwater, hence the drainage holes. Dionaea don't normally have their roots actually underwater in habitat. For example, Drosera intermedia is an exception, and is always found literally sitting in water.

The charcoal absorbs large organic molecules, including smelly ones. It's a long standing tradition to use it in certain parts of the pot, that's all I can claim. It keeps things "sweet". I'm sure it is not actually necessary (~8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst they are bog plants, drainage plays a big part in the induction and introduction of oxygen into the soil during rainfall. Innundation of plants isnt in itself bad but prolonged submersion robs the roots of oxygen and can promote anaerobic conditions which can kill the plants, so drain holes below the growing length of the roots is a good idea and the bigger the pot the better.

Cheers

Steve

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for all the constructive advise. I plan on getting a plasterers bath, 4 foot x 2 foot x foot deep,  in a few weeks and fitting a tap at the bottom to drain the excess water from time to time and to bring fresh air to the roots.  This pot however is just for a short while until I can get everything sorted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've set up the pot, which I plan to use for a season or two. Basically, upturned pot to act as a water reservoir, with peat and grit mix placed on top. Halfway up the side of the pot, I've drilled two small holes. So far, the mix is constantly damp and the excess water just drains from the two holes. 

Keep you guys posted....

 

Craig 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds good. I do similar with my potted Sarracenias and put a wooden plug (skewer) in them occasionally to allow higher water levels or to compensate for when I am away for a few days or just to save watering them too frequently.

Cheers

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now