Karsty

Forcing Nepenthes to pitcher?

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Karsty    12

I've got a Nepenthes 'Suki' which I acquired early this year with several pitchers on it. I fed them quite copiously with caught bugs, and the plant has been growing like a monster all year, in fact I've repotted it twice. It has a total width of just over 1m, and a height of about 40cm. I got fed up with it growing wildly, but producing no pitchers. All the old pitchers were half-dead, so I have tried an experiment. I cut off all the old pitchers, which were presumably still feeding the plant and not motivating it to produce new ones. It actually looks like it is now beginning to pitcher. I'll get back with updates.

 

IMG_20170827_131155b.jpg

Edited by Karsty

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manders    590

It may not have enough light, cant tell from the photo but it looks shady.

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Karsty    12

Well it varies, from about 60% to about 85%. It varies quite a lot, depending on the weather and time of year. I haven't measured it for a while in that spot because I did for several months and was happy with it. I stumbled across one growers conclusions and he said humidity did not matter.

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manders    590

I dont think its humidity, i have one growing in a dry sunny windowsill and it pitchers.

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Plantsman89    15

How long ago was it repotted? I've had a couple of Nepenthes sulk for quite some time after repotting. Their roots are quite brittle and susceptible to break when transplanting. 

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Karsty    12

Well, I repotted it about May this year, then again this month, August. I was extremely careful both times, and it gave no indication of sulking, just kept growing like billyo.

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Karsty    12

I think she is getting enough sun. She's right by a SW window. I've got others in less light which are pitchering very nicely. Strangely, Bloody Mary and Ventrata have been pretty sulky all year. Also the new leaves are always very red.

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Tropicat    72

very nice! I have had a Nepenthes that didn't pitcher for a full year. Now it started to make new (huge!) pitchers again. Manders you are right, most often the reason for Nepenthes not pitchering is lack of light. I think this one just needed a bit of patience. Keep us informed! :)

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fltropical    3

Def. light. I have one in the tropics. During the summer I've sometimes had it in direct sunlight for up to six hours. It turns a nice shade of red. Season also seems to play a role - mine pitchers in winter and late summer... but can go months in betweeen before producing a new round.


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Tropicat    72

Sure. It is Nepenthes Louisa. I has almost turned into a tree. From the soil to the highest point of the stem it meassures 110 cm. Unfortunately, in the winter this Nepenthes doesnt do as well with me as in the summer, since it gets quite cold here.

 

This is my biggest pitcher:
 

 

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I also want to add, I triedd different pots and mixes with my Nepentheses. I noticed they grow very well in these baskets. That seemed to matter more to them than the mix. I just put the basket on top of an empty pot with holes in it, on top of a dish. This way the water can run through and then vaporize again from the dish below.

20170303_105311

 

Edited by Tropicat

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Tropicat    72

In the summer if the weather is ok I put all my Nepenthes out in the garden. They catch their own insects then (usually spiders in the night for some reason). If i find the occasional bug in the house i will throw that in an open pitcher as well. I dont think they need a lot of feeding, I am not all that bothered by feeding them. I think light and temperature fluctuation are the most important for Nepenthes to survive. Humidity also doesnt seem to have such a big influence on most of my nepenthes, but I live in a pretty humid environment. As long as it doesn't drop below 60% they are ok.

Edited by Tropicat

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